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Full text of "Graduate catalog."

West 
Chester 
University 
HUH 










Graduate Catalog 



2005-2007 




West Chester University of Pennsylvania 




Graduate Catalog 
2005-2007 



The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an irrevocable contract between the stu- 
dent and the University. West Chester University reserves the right to change any provisions or 
requirements at any time. Updates to this two-year catalog will be made late in the 2006 spring 
semester and will be posted directly to the University's Web site: www.wcupa.edu. Please check the 
Web site before the fall 2006 semester for any changes. 

The West Chester University Mission Statement 

West Chester University, a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, is a public, regional, compre- 
hensive institution committed to providing access and offering high-quality undergraduate education, select post-bac- 
calaureate and graduate programs, and a variety of educational and cultural resources for its students, alumni, and citizens 
of southeastern Pennsylvania. 

The West Chester University Values Statement 

West Chester University is committed to attracting, enrolling, and graduating qualiu' students from a wide variety of edu- 
cational, cultural, and economic backgrounds. This endeavor requires the University to attract and retain highly qualified 
faculty and staff and to provide each member of the University community with learning and leadership development 
opportunities. To this end, the University supports and encourages programs which benefit all people and which seek to 
eradicate discrimination and injustice. We treasure what we believe to be the highest principles of American societ)': the 
worth and uniqueness of each individual, the belief that success is to be earned by individual effort put forth in an envi- 
ronment founded on equahty of opportunity, and the appreciation of the ideal of an inclusive society. 
We believe that it is incumbent upon all members of our community - staff, students, faculty and administrators - to con- 
duct themselves with civility toward one another at all times. We value the special talents and contributions of each mem- 
ber of our community. We fiirther affirm the worth and dignity of each member and the shared responsibility of all to 
treat each other as individuals, with respect and courtesy. 

As a university owned by the citizens of Pennsylvania, we value our mission to provide the best educational opportunities 
possible which will enable the University community to successfijUy address the concerns of a global society. To this end. 
West Chester University seeks to provide diligent advising for students and to focus on teaching students to think clearly 
and critically, to make logical and ethical judgments, and to communicate effectively with others. 

West Chester University's community strongly supports the principles of academic integrity and academic responsibility, 
\dewing both as the province of every member of the campus communit\'. We hold the highest esteem for teaching direct- 
ed toward student learning and affirm that mastery of content as well as master\' of teaching skills necessary to communi- 
cate such content are paramount. 

This values statement is intended to be a living document which will serve West Chester University as it changes and 
evolves in the coming years. 



Communications Directory 

MAILINCJ AUUKESS; West Chester Univcrsiry 
West Chester, PA 19383 

TELEPHONES: Dial 610-436 plus number in parentheses. 

For offices not shown here, call the 
University Information Center: 
610-436-1000. 

Admissions Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 

Education, McKelvie Hall (2943) 

Adult Studies Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 

Education, McKelvie Hall (1009) 

Affirmative Action Office of Social Equity, 13/15 University 

Ave. (2433) 
Billing/Payments Office of the Bursar, Bull Center (2552) 

Bookstore Student Services Inc., Sykes Student Union 

(2242) 

Careers/Placement Twardowski Career Development Center, 

Lawrence Center (2501) 

Counseling Counseling Center, Lawrence Center (2301) 

Financial Aid/ Office of Financial Aid, Bull Center 

Work Study (2627) 

Graduate Studies/ Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 

Catalogs Education, McKelvie Hall (2943) 

Housing Residence Life and Housing Services, 

Sykes Student Union (3307) 

Police Public Safety Department, Peoples 

Building (3311) 

Public Relations Office of Public Relations and 

and Marketing Marketing, 13/15 University Ave. (3383) 

Scheduling/Registration Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education, McKelvie Hall (2943) 

Services for Students Office of Services for Students 

with Disabilities with Disabilities, Lawrence Center (2564) 

Student Services, Inc. Sykes Student Union (2955) 
Summer Sessions Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 

Education, McKelvie HaU (2943) 

Teacher Certification Teacher Education Information and 

Advisement Center, Recitation Hall (2426) 

Undergraduate Catalogs Office of Admissions, 100 West Rosedale 
(3411) 

University Events/ Student Programming Dept./Student 

Student .Activities Activities (2983) 

Nondiscrimination/Affirmative Action Policy 

West Chester University is committed to providing leadership in extending 
equal opportunities to all individuals. Accordingly, the University will continue 
to make every effort to provide these rights to all persons regardless of race, 
religion, sex, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, sexual orientation, 
disability, or veteran status. This policy applies to all members of the 
University community, including students, faculty, staff, and administrators. It 
also applies to all applicants for admission or employment and all participants 
in University-sponsored activities. 

This policy is in compliance with federal and state laws, including Titles VI 
and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Educational 
Amendment of 1972, Section 504 of the Kehabilitation Act of 1973, 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and Executive Order of the 
Governor of Pennsylvania. Any individual having suggestions, problems, com- 
plaints, or grievances with regard to equal opportunity or afTirmalivc action, or 
to request a translation of this publication into a language other than English, 
is encouraged to contact Ms. Richclecn Dashicid, director. Office of Social 
Equity, 13/15 University Ave., 610-436-2433. 



Sexual Harassment Policy 

West Chester University is committed to equality of opportunity and freedom 
from discrimination for all of its students and employees. Because sexual 
harassment is a form of discrimination based on sex, the University will not 
tolerate it in any form. 

Upon official filing of a complaint, immediate investigation will be made cul- 
minating in appropriate corrective action where warranted, which may include 
termination of the relationship with the University. 

Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual 
favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature occurring when; 

1. submission to the unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature is made either 
explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of an individual's employment, or 
of a student's academic status or treatment, 

2. submission to or rejection of the unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature by 
an individual is used as the basis for academic or employment decisions 
affecting such an individual; or 

3. the unwelcome conduct of a sexual nature is sufficiendy severe, persistent, 
or pervasive to limit an individual's ability to participate in, benefit from, or 
perform at extracurricular activities, work, academic or educational pro- 
grams, or to create a hostile or abusive linng, working, or academic environ- 
ment. 

A complete copy of the University's Sexual Harassment Policy document, 
inclusive of the Sexual Harassment Complaint Procedure, may be obtained 
from the Office of Social Equity. 

Individuals who believe themselves to be the victims of sexual harassment, or 
who have questions about the University's policy on this matter should contact 
Ms. Richelcen Dashield, director. Office of Social Equity, 13/15 University 
Ave., 610-436-2433. 

ADA Policy and Accommodations 

In keeping with West Chester Unive^sit^ 's commitment to equality of oppor- 
tunity and compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the 
University has established procedures and designated offices to provide accom- 
modations for all people with disabilities. A complete copy of the ADA Policy 
Statement, as well as appropriate offices, appears on page 22 of this catalog. 
Individuals needing accommodations should make their needs known to the 
responsible office at least a week in advance. This publication is available on 
the Web site (www.wcupa.edu). A disk version for those needing accommoda- 
tions is available from the Office of Graduate Studies, 610-436-2943. 

Accreditation 

West Chester University is accredited by the Accreditation Council for 
Continuing Medical Education, American Chemical Society, American 
Dietetics Association, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 
Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAA- 
HEP), Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, Council of Social Work 
Education, Council on Education for Public Health, Joint Renew Committee 
for Respiratory Therapy Education, Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Schools (MSA), National Association of Schools of Music (NASM), and 
Society of Public Health Education/ American Association for Health Education 
(SOPHE/AAHE). West Chester Universini's professional education programs 
are accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher 
Education (NCATE) and approved by the Pennsylvania Department of 
Education to recommend candidates for certilication. 

The provisions of this catalog are not to be regarded as an 
irrevocable contract between the student and the University. 
West Chester University reserves the right to change any 
provisions or requirements at any time. 



Office of Graduate Studies and Extended Education 

McKelvie HaU 

102 W. Rosedale Avenue 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383-2600 

610-436-2943 

Fax: 610-436-2763 

E-mail: gradstudy#wcupa.edu 

Web site: http://vvvvw.wcupa.edu 



Contents 



Communications Directory ii 

Graduate Programs of Study 2 

Graduate Studies at West Chester 3 

Admission 4 

Good Standing, Academic Probation, Degree 

Candidacy, and Degree Requirements 7 

Fees and Expenses 8 

Financial Aid 11 

Academic Information and Regulations 14 

University Services and Student Living 23 

Structure of the University 28 

Programs of Study and Course Offerings 28 

Guide to the Catalog 28 

Administration 29 

Certificate in Administration 29 

Human Resources Management 30 

Individualized Concentration 30 

Training and Development 31 

Leadership for Women 31 

Long-Term Care 31 

Public Administration 31 

Regional Planning 31 

Sport and Athletic Administration 31 

Anthropology and Sociology 31 

Art 32 

Biology 33 

Business 36 

Master of Business Administration Program . . 36 

Accounting 37 

Economics and Finance 37 

Management 38 

Marketing 39 

Chemistry 40 

Communication Studies 42 

Communicative Disorders 43 

Computer Science 45 

Counseling and Educational Psychology 46 

Criminal Justice 49 

Early Childhood and Special Education 50 

Elementary Education 53 



English 55 

Foreign Languages 60 

Geography and Planning 62 

Geology and Astronomy 63 

Health 65 

History 68 

Holocaust and Genocide Studies 70 

Instructional Media 71 

Kinesiology 71 

Leadership for Women 74 

Linguistics 75 

Literacy 76 

Mathematics 78 

Music 80 

Applied Music 81 

Music Education 83 

Music History and Literature 85 

Music Theory/Composition 86 

Nursing 87 

Philosophy 90 

Political Science 90 

Professional and Secondary Education 91 

Psychology 95 

Social Work - Graduate 97 

Teaching English as a Second Language 100 

Theatre and Dance 101 

Women's Studies 101 

Guide to Course Prefixes 102 

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 103 

Administration 104 

Faculty 105 

University Policy for Storm Closings 118 

Academic Calendar 119 

Campus Map 120 

Borough of West Chester 121 

Chester County Map 122 

Index 123 



Graduate Programs of Study 



Administration 

M.S.A. (Concentrations: Human Resource 

Management, Individualized, Leadership for 
Women, Long-Term Care, Public 
Administration, Regional Planning, Sport and 
Athletic Administration, Training and 
Development) 

Certificate in Administration 

Certificate in Gerontolog)' 

Certificate in Human Resource Management 

Certificate in Leadership for Women 

Anthropology and Sociology 

M.S.A. (Concentration: Long-Term Care) 
Certificate in Gerontology 

Biology 

M.S. Biology (thesis) 

M.S. Biolog)' (nonthesis) 

M.S. Biolog)' (Natural Science Track) 

Business 

M.B.A. (Concentrations: Economics/Finance, 
Executive, General Business, Management, 
Technology and Electronic Commerce) 

Chemistry 

M.A. Physical Science (Concentration: 

Chemistry) 
M.Ed. Chemistry 
M.S. Chemistry 
M.S. Clinical Chemistry 

Communication Studies 

M.A. Communication Studies 

Communicative Disorders 

M.A. Communicative Disorders 
Computer Science 

M.S. Computer Science 
Certificate in Computer Science 

Counseling and Educational 
Psychology 

M.Ed. Counseling: Elementary School 

Counseling 
M.Ed. Counseling: Secondary School Counseling 
M.S. Counseling: Higher Education/Post 

Secondary 
Certificate in Professional Counseling Licensure 

Preparation 
Specialist I Certificate in Counseling 

(Elementary or Secondary) 

Criminal Justice 

M.S. Crimiii.il Justice 

Early Childhood and Special 
Education 

M.Ed. Early Childhood Education 
M.Ed. Special Education 



Ccriificatioii in Special Education 

Elementary Education 

M.Ed. Elementary Education (Concentrations: 
Creative Teaching-Learning, Elementary 
Education, Gifted and Talented, Human 
Development, Language Arts, Social Studies) 
Certification in Elementary Education 
Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 

English 

M.A. English (thesis) 

M.A. English (nonthesis) 

M.A. Teaching English as a Second Language 

(TESL) 
Certificate in TESL 

Foreign Languages 

M.A. French 
M.A. Spanish 
M.Ed. French 
M.Ed. Spanish 

Geography and Planning 

M.A. Geography 

M.S.A. (Concentration: Regional Planning) 

Geology and Astronomy 

M.A. Physical Science (Concentration: Earth 

Sciences) 

Health 

M.Ed. School Health 

M.RH. Public Health 

Certification in Health 

Certificate in Emergency Preparedness 

Certificate in Health Care Adminisration 

Certificate in Integrated Health 

History 

M.A. History 
M.Ed. History 

Holocaust and Genocide Studies 

M.A. Holocaust and Genocide Studies 
Certificate in Holocaust and Genocide Studies 

Kinesiology 

M.S. Health and Physical Education 

(Concentrations: General Physical Education, 

Exercise and Sport Physiology) 
M.S.A. (Concentration: Sport and Athletic 

Administration) 
Certification in Driver Education and Safe Living 

Leadership for Women 

M.S.A. (Concentration: Leadership for Women) 
Certificate in Leadership for Women 

Literacy 

M.Ed. Reading 
Certificate in Literacy 



Certification as a Reading Specialibt 

Mathematics 

M.A. Mathematics (options in Mathematics, 

Mathematics Exiucation) 
M.S. Applied Statistics 
Certification in Mathematics 
Certificate in Applied Statistics 

Music 

M.A. Music History 
M.M. Accompanying 
M.M. Music Education 
M.M. Music Performance 
M.M. Music Theory/Composition 
M.M. Piano Pedagogy 
Certificate in Kodaly Methodology 
Certificate in OrfF-Schulwerk 

Nursing 

M.S.N. 

Certification in School Nursing 

Certificate in Parish Nursing 

Philosophy 

M.A. Philosophy 

Professional and Secondary Education 

M.Ed. Secondary Education 
M.S. Educational Research 
Certification in Secondary Education 
Certificate in Teaching and Learning with 

Technology 
Courses in Environmental Education; Urban 

Education 

Psychology 

M.A. Psychology: Clinical 

M.A. Psychology: General 

M.A. Psychology: Industrial/Organizational 

Certificate in Clinical Mental Health 

Public Administration 

M.S.A. (Concentration: Public Administration) 

Social Work 

M.S.W. 

Teaching English as a Second 
Language 

M.A. Teaching English as a Second Language 
Certificate in TESL 

The following departments and inter- 
disciplinary areas offer graduate courses, 
but no graduate degree: Anthropology 
and Sociology, Art, Linguistics, Theatre 
Arts, and Women's Studies. 



Graduate Studies at West Chester 



I'hc mission ot graduate education at West Chester University 
is to provide high-quality, accessible graduate degree, profes- 
sional growth, and certificate programs responsive to students' 
needs for professional development and educational enrich- 
ment. The otk-rings reflect a wide range of master's programs 
as well as a selected number of specialist and professional 
growth oppornmities. The quality of programs is enhanced by 
the graduate students' access to and interaction with faculty' 
and by the richness of the diverse student body. The graduate 
programs are integrated with the research, outreach, and devel- 
opment fiinctions of the University. The faculty fosters excel- 
lence in teaching and promotes an intellectual environment 
that actively supports quality graduate education. The goals of 
graduate study at this University' are as follows: 

1. Foster an attitude of inteUectual and creative inquiry and to 
develop research and analytical skills that are applicable to 
professional settings. 

2. Increase the professional skills and academic competence of 
students to enable them to make important contributions to 
their professions. 

3. Prepare students for further graduate study. 

4. Meet the needs of college graduates who are preparing for 
changing career roles in the fiiture. 

THE GRADUATE STUDIES PROGRAM at West Chester 
has grown remarkably since its introduction in 1959. 
Approximately 2,000 students now attend during the fall and 
spring semesters; some 1,800 enroll for summer sessions. West 
Chester University's graduate program is the largest within the 
14 Commonwealth-owned institutions of higher learning. 
The University began as the West Chester Academy in 1812 
and functioned as a normal school from 1871-1927. Since it 
became a four-year college in 1927, West Chester has devel- 



oped steadily and is n<nv one ut the major comprehensive insti- 
tutions of higher learning in the Philadelphia vicinity. 
Facilities for graduate education are excellent. The Common- 
wealth's extensive building program in the 1950s led to the 
Schmucker Science Center, a block-long complex of buildings 
including a planetarium, an astronomical observatory, and 
modern laboratories; the Elsie O. Bull Learning and Research 
Center; and the Francis Harvey Green Library, one of 
Pennsylvania's principal university libraries. The Boucher 
Science Center was added in 1995, and two new buildings - 
Swope Music Building and the Performing Arts Center, and a 
Business Center - are in the planning stages. 
The University offers the master of arts, master of business 
administration, master of education, master of music, master of 
science, master of science in administration, and master of 
social work in approximately 50 disciplines or areas of study. 
Master's degree programs such as the M.B.A., the M.A. in 
communicative disorders, the M.S.A., the M.S. in computer 
science, the M.S.W., and the certificate of advanced graduate 
study are offered, as well as certificate programs in several 
areas, including administration, computer science, counseling, 
elementary education, gerontology, human resource manage- 
ment, leadership for women, literacy (reading), and special 
education. 

In addition to its degree, certification, and certificate programs, 
West Chester offers certificates in administration, computer 
science education, and health, as well as nondegree study in a 
number of areas including art, linguistics, theatre arts, and 
women's studies. 

For the benefit of in-service teachers and other employed per- 
sons. West Chester schedules most of its graduate classes dur- 
ing late afternoons and evenings. 



Graduate Summer Sessions 

Summer school includes two five-week 
terms plus a three-week post session, 
devoted primarily to workshops (see 
"Admission" to apply) and courses/pro- 
grams offered in program-specific for- 
mats (see summer course schedule). 
Admission to summer sessions courses 
does not constitute admission to a 
degree program. 

The Campus 

The University is located in West 
Chester, a communirv in southeastern 
Pennsylvania strategically located at the 
center of the mid- Atlantic corridor. The 
seat of Chester County government for 
almost two centuries, West Chester 
retains much of its historical charm in 
its buildings and countryside, but offers 
the 20th-century advantages of a town 



in the heart of an expanding economic 
area. The University occupies 402 acres. 
The main campus is situated on 106 
acres within the Borough of West 
Chester; the south campus is located on 
a 293-acre tract in adjacent townships. 
Five miles from the main campus is the 
Graduate Business Center located on 
McDermott Drive in West Chester. 
West Chester was settled in the early 
eighteenth century principally by mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends. With a 
population of about 20,000, the borough 
is small enough to have the pleasant 
aspects ot a tree-shaded American town, 
large enough to provide essential servic- 
es and the substance of a vigorous com- 
munity, and old enough to give the stu- 
dent first-hand contact with America's 
early history. The heart of West Chester 
is its courthouse, a Classical Revival 



building designed in the 1840s by 
Thomas U. Walter, one of the architects 
for the Capitol in Washington, D.C. 

How to Reach West Chester 

The Borough of West Chester is easily 
accessible from all directions both by car 
and public transportation. Route 3, the 
West Chester Pike, leads directly into 
town from center-city Philadelphia. 
From the Pennsylvania Turnpike, 
motorists traveling west should take 
Route 202 south from the Valley Forge 
Interchange (exit #326), while those 
traveling east can arrive via Route 100 
south from the Downingtown 
Interchange (exit #312). From the 
south, Route 202 from Wilmington and 
Routes 100 and 52 from U.S. Route 1 
all lead to West Chester. 



Admission 



Student Responsibility' 

It is the responsibilit)' of students to know 
and obscn'e ;ill policies and procedures 
for their programs. The Universit)- will 
not waive a regulation because a student 
claims unawareness of it. Students should 
adhere to the dates relating to application 
for graduation as well as other pertinent 
deadlines announced by the department 
or the Office of Graduate Studies and 
Ejctended Education. 

The Application Procedure 

Students with a bachelor's degree from 
an accredited coUege or university in the 
United States or with equivalent prepa- 
ration acquired in another country are 
eligible to apply for admission to a grad- 
uate program. 

Self-managed applications are available 
from the Office of Graduate Studies 
and Extended Education or through the 
University' 's Web site (www.wcupa.edu). 
Students must submit the completed 
application and supporting documenta- 
tion directly to the Office of Graduate 
Studies, including the following: 

1. Two official copies of academic 
records (transcripts) from every college 
and university attended (except West 
Chester University). Students should 
follow the instructions in the applica- 
tion. Note: Applicants to a profession- 
al growth program need only submit 
transcripts from the institution where 
their highest degree was earned. 

2. Three letters of professional recom- 
mendation (special form required of 
M.S.W. applicants). 

3. A written statement of professional 
goals. This statement can be typed or 
printed on separate paper. Students 
should include three signed copies. 
Foreign language candidates must write 
the statement in the program language. 

4. In addition, many programs require a 
recognized test of scholastic aptitude, 
e.g.. Graduate Record Examination 
(General and/or Advanced), the 
Miller Analogies Test (MAT), and/or 
the Graduate Management 
Admissions Test (GMAT). Upon the 
student's request, test scores are sent 
by the originating source (e.g., 
Educational Testing Service) directly 
to West Chester University. 



5. Additional requirements may include 
the following: 

• An audition (music applicants only) 

• Resume 

• Any supplemental information 
(e.g., forms, writing samples 
required by department) 

• A few departments may require a 
personal interview. 

6. Applicants should consult with the 
graduate coordinator of the primary 
interest area to assure compliance 
with admission requirements for a 
particular degree program. 

The applicant is responsible for assuring 
that the Office of Graduate Studies 
receives all necessary materials by the 
recommended application deadlines. 
All application materials become the 
property of West Chester University 
and may not be returned or forwarded 
to another institution. 

Application Deadline 

For most of the graduate programs, rec- 
ommended deadlines for the submission 
of completed applications are as follows: 
April 15 - fall semester, October 15 - 
spring semester, and April 15 for gradu- 
ate assistant applicants. 
Some programs have established differ- 
ent recommended application deadlines. 
Please see application information under 
individual programs listed in this catalog. 
The application and all supporting cre- 
dentials should be submitted to the 
Office of Graduate Studies by the dead- 
line dates shown above. Late applications 
will be accepted; however, admission 
will be on a space-available basis for 
applicants who meet all other admission 
requirements. Applicants who have 
missed the deadline should consult vvath 
the graduate coordinator for that program 
to receive advice regarding the possibility 
of enrolling as a nondegree student for a 
maximum of six credits while awaiting 
action on their application. 
Students interested in receiving a graduate 
assistantship should apply to the Office of 
Graduate Studies no later than April 15. 

NotiRcation of Admission 

All applications are reviewed by both 
the appropriate department or program 
and the dean of graduate studies. 



The dean will notitj' applicants ot the 
acceptance or rejection of their applica- 
tions. If accepted, students must follow 
all program advising and scheduling poli- 
cies and procedures. Accepted students 
should meet immediately with their 
advisers to outline a program of study. 

Matriculation Fee 

At the time of acceptance into a gradu- 
ate program at West Chester University, 
the student must submit a nonrefiindable 
fee of $100 to reser\'c his/her admission. 
This sum is applied toward the student's 
tuition and/or fees but is nonrefijndable 
should the student subsequendv decide 
not to attend West Chester University. 
The student's admission is canceled if 
he/she fails to submit the $100 matricu- 
lation fee by the due date. 

Admission Requirements for 
Degree Students 

1. AppUcants must have a baccalaureate 
degree from a college or university 
accredited in the United States or its 
equivalent from a school in another 
country. 

2. West Chester Universit)' is phasing in 
new GPA requirements. Beginning 
fall 2005, the University will require a 
minimum GPA of 2.65 with a mini- 
mum of 2.75 in the major discipline. 
Effective fall 2006, a minimum 2.80 
undergraduate GPA wiU be required. 
Some programs may require addition- 
al GPA standards. (An "A" equals 4.0.) 
Provisional acceptance may be possi- 
ble under some circumstances for 
applicants who do not meet this stan- 
dard. 

3. Applicants must submit scores from 
the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GMAT), Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE), or the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT) if these are 
required for admission to the program 
in which the student wishes to enroll. 
Applicants to a program with any of 
the above requirements who have an 
eiuned, recognized, post-baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited college or 
university will have this requirement 
waived. A student with an earned 
graduate level certificate from West 
Chester University (sec page 5 con- 
cerning certificates), applying to a 



Admission 



graduate program, may have the stan- 
dardized test waived at the recommen- 
dation of the graduate coordinator. 

4. The department ottering the desired 
degree program must recommend 
acceptance. Before such recommen- 
dation is given, an interview with a 
facult)' member may be required. The 
apphcant also must meet any other 
additional requirements established 
for the degree program, including 
grade point averages that exceed the 
minimum graduate admission 
requirements. 

5. The dean of graduate studies and 
extended education must give official 
acceptance. Only written notice from 
the dean constitutes approval of 
admission, not correspondence with a 
department or an individual faculty 
member. 

6. Space must be available in the pro- 
gram. 

7. Requirements to resolve academic 
deticiencies are to be met prior to 
registering tor graduate courses. 
Individual departments may have 
more rigorous requirements. 

West Chester University's policy for 
graduate studies includes that the high- 
est possible grades/test scores do not 
guarantee admission to graduate school, 
nor do low grades/test scores automati- 
cally disquality- a candidate. Our policy 
is that no appUcant should be admitted 
unless we expect that applicant to do 
well enough to graduate and have no 
serious academic problems. 
Note: At the graduate level, West 
Chester University performs an individ- 
ualized and holistic review of all appli- 
cations tor admission to the University. 
Graduate admission decisions are made 
using a variety of crieria including the 
undergraduate grade point average, let- 
ters of reference, an applicant's goal 
statement, and where required by the 
program, standardized test scores, port- 
foUo review of work/life experience, and 
other similar program-specific require- 
ments. Graduate applications are 
reviewed by the graduate coordinator for 
recommendation, and admissions deci- 
sions are made by the graduate dean. 
Individuals who have questions about 
their admissibilitT»' are encouraged to 
contact the Office of Graduate Studies 
or the appropriate graduate coordinator. 
An applicant who has academic deticien- 
cies may be granted provisional status. 
The departmental graduate coordinator 



will specify course work which must be 
taken to remove such deficiencies and 
which might not be credited to degree 
requirements including, if necessary, 
undergraduate prerequisites. Admission to 
degree study does not constitute admis- 
sion to degree candidacy. After a student 
has satisfactorily tulfilled certain course 
requirements specified in the degree pro- 
gram and has completed 12 to 15 semes- 
ter hours of work, the student must apply 
for admission to degree candidacy. 

Policies and Procedures for 
Graduate Certificate Programs 

Definitions 

A graduate certificate program is a 
focused collection of courses that, when 
completed, affords the student some 
record of coherent academic accom- 
plishment in a given discipline or set of 
related discipUnes. It is not a degree. 

Guidelines 

1. Students are awarded a graduate 
certificate upon completion of a 
weU-defined program of course 
work within an approved graduate 
program. 

2. The didactic material encompassed 
within a graduate certificate program 
may represent a subset or extension 
of an existing graduate discipline. 

3. For a graduate certificate program, the 
number of graduate credits is expected 
to be 18, unless noted otherwise. 

4. Graduate certificate programs may 
be at the post-baccalaureate or 
post-master's level. Post-master's 
graduate certificate programs must 
be designated as such. 

5. Graduate certificate programs do 
not include a thesis. 

6. All graduate certificate programs 
wiU be reviewed within the course 
of regular graduate program assess- 
ment and review. 

7. Certificate programs also may be 
proposed for post-baccalaureate stu- 
dents that consist of undergraduate 
credit courses, professional credit 
courses, or noncredit courses; in such 
cases, the programs will not be con- 
sidered to have met the standards for 
graduate certificate programs. 

8. With the exception of courses offered 
in collaboration with another institu- 
tion or ex-pressly addressed in the cer- 
tificate program requirements, a 
majority of credits for the certificate 



program must be completed at West 
Chester University. Graduate credits 
from another accredited institution 
may be accepted for transfer and are 
subject to the transfer of credit policy 
in place with approval of the depart- 
ment and the dean of graduate stud- 
ies and extended education. 

9. Students pursuing a graduate certifi- 
cate will be required to meet the 
same academic requirements as those 
defined for degree-seeking students 
(e.g., maintenance of a 3.0 GPA). 

10. The title of any graduate certificate 
program must contain the words 
"Graduate Certificate Program." 
Only Pennsylvania Department of 
Education certification programs 
may include the word "certification." 

11. While the courses in a graduate cer- 
tificate program may be used as evi- 
dence in support of a student's appU- 
cation for admission to a graduate 
degree program, the certificate itself 
is not considered a prerequisite. 

Student Eligibility and Admission 
Criteria 

1. Admission criteria beyond the bache- 
lor's degree from an accredited insti- 
tution will be determined by the 
department and explicidy stated. In 
most instances, the undergraduate 
degree should be related to the cer- 
tificate program. 

2. Each program may set admissions 
criteria above those required for gen- 
eral graduate admissions to a certifi- 
cate program (e.g., higher GPA or 
TOEFL scores, standardized test 
scores, whether or not certificate 
courses may be counted towards a 
related master's degree program). 

3. Graduate certificate students are not 
eligible for graduate assistantships. 

Graduate Record Examination 
and Graduate Management 
Admission Test 

Scores from the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE) or Graduate 
Management Admission Test (GiVIAT) 
are required for many degree programs. 
The prospective degree student should 
consult the appropriate program outline 
and schedule a test prior to matriculation. 
Both tests are administered by the 
Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 
6004, Princeton, NJ 08541-6004. For 
current information regarding application 
materials and test dates, contact the 



Admission 



Counseling Center, 610-436-2301. 
Application forms must be filed with the 
Educational Testing Service at least 15 
days prior to the date of an)' examination. 
The examinations may be taken at any 
of the testing centers designated by the 
Educational Testing Service. 

Miller Analogies Test 

Some degree programs require students to 
take the N Idler Analogies Test. Students 
requiring the test can call 1-800-622-3231. 

Undergraduates 

An undergraduate who has completed 96 
credits of undergraduate course work, is 
in the final semester of work for the 
bachelors degree, and has an overall 
grade point average of at least 3.0 may, 
with the permission of the dean of gradu- 
ate studies and extended education, enroU 
in up to six credits of graduate-level 
courses. Credits earned may be applied to 
a master's degree program subject to the 
approval of the major department. 

Auditors 

Graduate students may declare "audit" 
status in a course through the end of the 
ninth week of class BUT may only audit 
one course per semester. Faculty may 
refiise to grant auditor status. Full-time 
graduate students have the privilege of 
auditing without additional charge, pro- 
vided they obtain approval from the 
course instructor and the course does not 
create an overload situation. If an over- 
load results, students are assessed the per 
credit rate for each credit in excess of 15. 
Part-time students may audit, provided 
they obtain the instructor's approval, 
enroll in the course through the Office 
of the Registrar, E.O. Bull Center, and 
pay the regular course fees. 
Credit is never given to auditors. The 
auditor status may not be changed after 
it has been declared. The grade of Audit 
(AU) is recorded on the student s tran- 
script. An audited course will not fulfill 
any requirement toward graduation. 

Transfer of Credit 

Applicants to a degree program at West 
Chester who have earned credits 
through previous graduate study at 
another college or university may trans- 
fer credit under certain circumstances. 
Application forms for transfer of credit 
may be obtained in the Office of 
Graduate Studies. The following condi- 
tions are the minimum requirements for 
acceptance of transfer credit: 



1. The credits must have been earned at 
an accredited graduate school. 

2. The courses taken must be approved by 
the department or program in which 
the applicant intends to enroll at West 
Chester and by the graduate dean. 

3. The maximum number of credits that 
may be tranferred shall not exceed 20 
percent of the total required for com- 
pletion of the student's degree pro- 
gram, rounded to the next highest 
three-credit increment. 

4. The grade earned for courses to be 
transferred must be B or better. (An 
"A" equals 4.0.) 

5. An official transcript and a course 
catalog description or syllabus must 
be submitted. Transcripts must be 
sent directly to the Office of 
Graduate Studies by the institution 
that granted the credits, and they 
must clearly indicate that the courses 
to be transferred are graduate courses 
for which graduate credit was given. 

6. The courses for transfer generally 
must have been taken recently 
enough to fall within the six-year 
time limitation. 

The Senior Citizen Policy 

The Senior Citizen Program allows 
retired Pennsylvania residents to attend 
West Chester University' tuition free on a 
SPACE-AVAILABLE BASIS. To qual- 
ify, the student must be retired, at least 
60 years old, and have been a 
Pennsylvania resident for at least a year. 
Students may enroll as either degree or 
nondegree students and may audit or 
take courses for credit. The program does 
not include internships, independent 
study, individualized instruction, student 
teaching, thesis, seminar, or any similar 
course requiring extra faculty compensa- 
tion for the additional enrollment. All 
scheduling information is available in the 
Office of Graduate Studies. 
Senior citizen students may not register 
prior to the beginning of classes. They 
must attend the first meeting of the 
class(es) for which they wish to register 
and obtain the instructor's signature on 
their schedule, indicating there is space 
available in the class. They then return 
their signed schedule, along with a 
signed Senior Citizen fee waiver form 
and signed audit form if they wish to 
audit, to the Office of Graduate Studies. 
The office then schedules the student 
and submits the fee waiver form to the 
Office of Financial Aid. 



Admission of International 
Students 

Students fi-om foreign countries may be 
admitted to the graduate program, provid- 
ed they meet certain special requirements 
in addition to the University' and program 
admission requirements. International stu- 
dents, like other out-of-state students, are 
accepted onl}' when space is available. 
Applications and supporting documents 
must be submitted to the Office of 
Graduate Studies no later than March 
15 for admission the following fall 
semester, and September 1 for admis- 
sion the following spring semester. 
Applicants whose native language is not 
English must submit e\'idence of satis- 
factory performance on the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language 
(TOEFL) to the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education before 
application forms can be processed. A 
score of 550 is the minimum acceptable 
score (213 for computer-based exam), 
although some programs have higher 
minimum requirements. Information 
about the TOEFL test, including test 
dates and locations in foreign countries, 
can be obtained from the Educational 
Testing Service, Box 6151, Princeton, 
NJ 08541-6151, U.S.A. Registration • 
forms must reach Princeton at least five 
weeks before the test is to be taken. 
Apphcants who faU to achieve a mini- 
mum score of 550 on the TOEFL may 
be admitted to the English as a Second 
Language (ESL) program, providing 
they are otherwise eligible for admission 
to the graduate degree program to 
which they have applied. Successfijl 
completion of the ESL program wiU 
qualify the apphcant for subsequent 
admission to a graduate degree program. 
The following information and docu- 
ments must be filed with the Office of 
Graduate Studies: 

1. A completed application form. 

2. An official copy of school certificates 
and diplomas, showing the date 
issued for all work done beyond the 
elementary level. 

3. Official record of the TOEFL score 
sent directly to the Office ot 
Graduate Studies by the Educational 
Testing Service. 

After the application and supporting 
documents have been reviewed, the 
Office of Graduate Studies will notify 
the apphcant of its action. If accepted, 
students must file the following intor- 



Good Standing, Academic Probation, Degree Candidacy, and Degree Requirements 



mation and ciocuincnts with the Center 
for International Programs Office. 

4. A proof of financial support form 
must be completed and returned to 
the Office of Graduate Studies. 
Current costs are approximately 
$16,250 for the academic year. 
(Summer and holidays are not fig- 
ured into these costs.) 

5. A medical history form and an 
immunization record must be com- 
pleted by a physician and returned to 
the Office of Graduate Studies. 

6. If a student is admitted to a degree 
program, the University will supply a 
U.S. Immigration (1-20) Form. 

After the application and supporting 
documents have been reviewed, the 
Office of Graduate Studies will notify 
the applicant of its action. International 
students are urged to remain in their 
own countries until they receive notice 
of acceptance. The University cannot 
assume responsibility for the housing or 
welfare of international students. 



Proof of Financial Support 

International students must demonstrate 
proof of financial support in the amount 
of $16,250 for their first academic year in 
the United States at West Chester 
University. That support can be demon- 
strated through a variety of sources, as 
long as the total from all sources of sup- 
port equals at least $16,250. The sources 
of funds can include scholarships, grants, 
loans, sponsorship by a U.S. citizen or 
permanent resident, personal or family 
funds, and acceptance deposits. All 
sources of fiinds must be verified. 
Acceptance deposits may be required to 
verify personal or family funds. For stu- 
dents who have previously studied in the 
United States, verification that all finan- 
cial obligations were met at prior academ- 
ic institutions may be all that is required 
to demonstrate proof of financial support. 

Insurance Requirements for 
International Students 

International students at West Chester 
University are required to carry adequate 
health and accident insurance. Insurance 



must be effective for all periods of time 
the student has been authorized to be in 
the United States by an immigration 
document issued by the University. 
Health and accident insurance policies 
must be purchased through a company 
that sells insurance in the United States. 
West Chester Universit)' has set mini- 
mum coverage standards which must be 
met by aU insurance policies. Information 
about the minimum standards is available 
at the Center for International Programs 
Office, 610-436-3515. 
To assure compliance with the insurance 
requirement, all international students 
must come to the center by August 31 
of each academic year (January 31 for 
students entering spring semester). 
There students may obtain information 
as to the amount of insurance required 
and the means of obtaining coverage to 
meet the insurance requirement. 

Readmission 

See policy on Continuous Enrollment, 
page 15. 



Good Standing, Academic Probation, Degree 
Candidacy, and Degree Requirements 



Good Standing 

Students must maintain a 3.00 cumula- 
tive average to remain in good standing. 

Academic Probation/Dismissal 

Graduate students whose cumulative 
grade point average falls below 3.00 will 
be placed on academic probation. 
Graduate students must raise their GPA 
to 3.00 by the end of the next semester (or 
fijJl summer term) in which they register. 
An additional probationary semester may 
be granted at the discretion of the gradu- 
ate dean. If a student fails to meet the 
conditions of academic probation he/she is 
subject to dismissal. Graduate students 
earning a cumulative GPA of 2.00 or 
lower will be dropped from their graduate 
program without a probationary period. 
Students who receive two grades of C+ 
or below will receive an academic warn- 
ing, regardless of GPA. Receipt of a 



third grade of C+ or below will result in 
academic dismissal, regardless of GPA. 
A graduate student earning a D or an F 
grade in any course will be dismissed 
from the University. Exceptions may be 
made for a course outside the student's 
discipline upon the recommendation of 
the graduate coordinator and the 
approval of the graduate dean. A D or an 
F earned at West Chester University may 
not be made up at another institution of 
higher learning for the same course. 
Grades earned during summer sessions 
count the same as grades earned during 
the academic year. All grades recorded 
determine the student's academic status, 
even if a student changes degree pro- 
grams. Students dropped from a gradu- 
ate program due to unsatisfactory work 
will not be permitted to take courses for 
credit towards a graduate degree in that 
department beyond the semester in 



which they are dropped. 
Individual programs may have higher 
GPA minimums or additional require- 
ments. To be eligible to receive the mas- 
ter's degree, graduate students must 
complete all requisite courses and credits 
with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.00. 
Students holding graduate assistantships 
who fail to maintain a 3.00 cumulative 
GPA will have their assistantships 
revoked or will not ha\'e them renewed. 
This policy includes courses taken dur- 
ing summer sessions. Departments also 
may stipulate higher academic standards 
for maintaining assistantships. 

Requirements for Admission to 
Degree Candidacy 

Application for degree candidacy must 
be made immediately on completion of 
the first 12 to 15 semester hours of 
course work in a degree program. 



Fees and Expenses 



During the prccandidacy period the stu- 
dent must do the following: 

1. Complete those courses which the 
department or program specifies as 
prerequisite to degree candidacy. 

2. Perform satisfactorily on examina- 
tions which the department or pro- 
gram may require tor admission to 
degree candidacy. 

3. Maintain a cumulative average of at 
least 3.00. 

4. Meet specific GPA requirements as 
stipulated by the individual degree 
program. 

Procedure for Application to 
Degree Candidacy 

1. Every student must file an applica- 
tion for admission to degree candida- 
cy with the dean of graduate studies 
and extended education. Forms are 
available in the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education. 

2. When the application has been eval- 
uated by the department concerned 
and by the dean of graduate studies 
and extended education, the graduate 
dean will send a letter of acceptance 
or rejection to the student. 

3. Upon notice of acceptance, degree 
candidates must confer with their 
advisers to continue with their previ- 
ously established program of study. 



Students must be admitted to degree 
candidacy prior to registering tor com- 
prehensive exams and before registering 
for thesis credits. 

Reapplication for Degjree 
Candidacy 

Applicants who fail to quality as degree 
candidates may reapply. They must 
maintain a cumulative grade point aver- 
age of 3.00. 

Summary of Requirements for 
the Master's Degree 

1. Admission to degree candidacy. 

2. Completion of all requisite courses 
and credits with a cumulative average 
of 3.00, compliance with specific GPA 
requirements as stipulated by the indi- 
vidual degree program, and achieve- 
ment of satisfactory scores on the 
Graduate Management Admission 
Test, Graduate Record Examination, 
or the Miller Analogies Test, if 
required. (See program requirements.) 

3. Satisfactory performance on a tinal writ- 
ten and/or oral comprehensive examina- 
tion conducted by the student's advisory 
committee in the field of sfjecialization. 
(It is the candidate's responsibility to 
determine if this is required by his/her 
program and to apply for this examina- 
tion by the prescribed deadlines.) 



4. Submission and approval ot the the- 
sis or research report in those pro- 
grams requiring it. 

5. Fulfillment of any special examina- 
tions, requirements, or competencies 
that are unique to a department or 
program. 

6. Fulfillment of all financial obligations 
to the Universirv, including payment 
of the graduation fee, and of all other 
obligations, including the return of 
University property. 

7. Compliance with all academic requests 
from the dean of graduate studies and 
extended education, including submis- 
sion of a form letter of intent to grad- 
uate by the specified due date. 

Additional Requirements for 
the Master of Education Degree 

In addition to fiilfilling these require- 
ments, candidates for certain master of 
education degrees must give evidence of 
successfiil teaching experience approved 
by the department chairperson. Other 
experiences in lieu ot this requirement 
must be approved by the relevant 
department and the dean of graduate 
studies and extended education. 



Fees and Expenses 



special Note: The fees listed below reflect 
charges at press time. For up-to-date infor- 
mation on fees at any given time, contact 
the Office of the Bursar, 610-436-2552. 
Fees and expenses are subject to change with- 
out notice. Fees shown here are in effect for 
the 2004—2005 academic year and apply to 
fall and spring semesters only. Changes for 
2005-06 and 2006-07, if approved, would 
occur after the printing of this catalog. 
Unless otherwise specified, fees may be paid 
by Visa, MasterCard, American Express, 
check, or money order made payable to West 
Chester University. The cancelled check, 
money order record, or charge card billing 
serves as a receipt. 



Basic Graduate Tuition for 
Legal Residents of Pennsylvania 

Less than 9 credits — $321.00 per 

semester hour of credit 
9 through 15 credits— $2,886.00 per 

semester 
More than 15 credits— $2,886.00 plus 

$321.00 for each semester hour of 

credit beyond 15 

Basic Graduate Tuition for 
Out-of-State Students 

Less than 9 credits — $513.00 per 

semester hour of credit 
9 through 15 credits— $4,618.00 per 

semester 
More than 15 credits — $4,618.00 plus 

$513.00 for each semester hour of 

credit beyond 15 



Technology Tuition Fee 

This mandatory instructional fee will be 
used to enhance classroom technology. 
All charges are per semester: 
Legal residents ot Pennsylvania: 
Full-time undergraduate and graduate — 

$50.00 
Part-time undergraduate and graduate — 

$25.00 
Out-of-state students: 
Full-time undergraduate and graduate — 

$75.00 
Part-time undergraduate and graduate — 

$38.00 
Summer will be considered as one semes- 
ter. Students enrolled in multiple summer 
sessions will be charge no more than the 
equivalent of the full-time semester rate. 



Fees and Expenses 



General Fee 

The general tec of $467 per tull-timc stu- 
dent (9 credits or more) or $53 per credit 
hour for the part-time student (8 credits 
or less) is a mandatory charge which cov- 
ers the use of the following services: 

• Sykes Student Union Fee: Previously 
called the communif)' center fee, this 
charge is for the operation and use of 
Sykes Student Union ($55). 

• Student Health Center Fee: This 
charge is for the use of the University 
Health Center ($65). Part-time gradu- 
ate students (registering for less than 
nine graduate credits) may elect to 
have the Student Health Center Fee 
($7 per credit) waived. Acceptance or 
rejection ot this option must be made 
at the time of initial registration for 
each semester or summer session. This 
choice cannot be changed until the 
time of the next registration. Students 
who elect to have this fee waived will 
not have services of the Student 
Health Center a\'ailable to them for 
the semester or summer session 
involved. Also, part-time graduate stu- 
dents are informed that the opportuni- 
ty to purchase University-approved 
health insurance is tied to payment of 
the Student Health Center Fee. 

• Sykes Student Union Expansion Fee: 
This fee supports the recent renova- 
tion of Sykes Student Union, which 
features new and improved student 
services ($60). 

• Graduate Student Association Fee: 
This fee funds the activities of the 
Graduate Student Association ($10). 

• Educational Services Fee: Students 
pay this fee in lieu of specific depart- 
ment charges ($241). 

• Parking Improvement Fee: This stu- 
dent-approved fee will be dedicated 
to improve the quality and availabili- 
ty of campus parking for students. It 
will provide for new student parking, 
improved shuttle service, and safety 
improvements. The cost is $36 for 
full-time students, and $4 per credit 
for part-time students. 

Application Fee 

A nonrefijndable graduate student appli- 
cation fee of $35 is assessed to all students 
applying to a graduate program. If a non- 
degree graduate student (a graduate stu- 
dent not yet officially admitted to a degree 
program) applies, he/she will pay this fee 
upon initial application to take a graduate 
course. He/she will not be assessed this fee 



agam once officially admitted to a degree 
program. Graduate program applicants 
who hold a master's degree from West 
Chester University will not be assessed the 
application fee when applying for a second 
master's degree or professional grovrth. 

Housing Fee 

Graduate student housing is limited at 
West Chester University. If housing is 
granted, a fee must be paid which will 
secure the occupancy offered. Possible 
options include a standard double room 
in a designated section of an undergrad- 
uate residence hall with one roommate, 
or in selected units of the South Campus 
apartment complex with five occupants 
in combinations of doubles and singles. 
This fee covers all utilities, including on- 
campus and local telephone service (stu- 
dents must provide the actual tele- 
phone). The University offers a special 
program for long-distance calling. The 
Student Occupancy Agreement, which 
must be signed before students check 
into their rooms, is binding for the full 
academic year (September-May), even 
for those students who may receive late 
room assignments. The current cost per 
student is $1,954 a semester for a tradi- 
tional residence hall; apartments are 
$2,267 for a double bedroom and $2,464 
for a single bedroom. These rates are 
subject to change and should be consid- 
ered reasonable approximations. 

Meal Fee 

All students residing in a North 
Campus residence hall (including affili- 
ated housing, UniversiU' Hall) must be 
on the Universitv' meal plan as a condi- 
tion of occupancy. Students with med- 
ical problems who cannot meet this 
requirement may request a meal waiver. 
Residents of the South Campus 
Apartment Complex and The Village at 
WCU, as well as off-campus and com- 
muting students, may purchase any meal 
plan offered or obtain meals at the tran- 
sient rate. 

Meal plans consist of 26 meal zones per 
week: 19 traditional breakfast/brunch, 
lunch, and dinner zones, plus seven late- 
night zones. The foUowing plans are 
available to resident students: 

• Variable 10 meals per week, plus 
$100 flex: $856 per semester 

• Variable 14 meals per week, plus 
$100 flex: $937 per semester 

• Variable 19 meals per week, plus 
$100 flex: $1,012 per semester 



For the above meal plans, the meal week 
runs from Saturday brunch through 
Friday late night. With these plans the 
diner can choose any combination of 
meals, but will forfeit any unused meals 
at the end of the meal week. 
Additional meal plan options for resi- 
dent students include the following: 

• Block Plan of 175 meals per semes- 
ter, plus $100 flex: $909 per semester 

• Block Plan of 225 meals per semes- 
ter, plus $100 flex: $995 per semester 

Block plans run the entire semester, so 
the diner can use them in any number 
configuration throughout the semester, 
but must use them up by the end of the 
semester or forfeit the remaining meals. 
South Campus residents (apartments 
and The Village), off-campus students, 
and commuters may select any of the 
above plans in addition to the following: 

• Block Plan of 75 meals per semester, 
plus $100 flex: $515 per semester 

• Flex-only Plan (must begin with 
$100 minimum account and can add 
in $25 increments). Flex dollars not 
used by the end of the fall semester 
will be transferred to the spring 
semester. However, any unused flex 
dollars at the end of the spring 
semester will be forfeited. Students 
who leave the University at the end 
of fall semester will forfeit any 
remaining flex dollars. 

AH meal plans may be used in the fol- 
lowing locations: Lawrence Dining HaU; 
the Diner; C-Stores/Grill operations; 
and the Ram's Head Food Court. 
National brands, such as Chick-fil-A, 
Subway, Einstein's Bagels, and Freshens 
will take cash and flex only. Students in 
North Campus residence halls will have 
their meal plan cost included in their 
University bill. Olf-campus, commuter, 
and South Campus Apartment/Village 
students can sign up for a meal plan by 
applying at the Office of the Bursar in 
the E.O. Bull Center. Any meal plan 
changes must be submitted within the 
first two weeks in the beginning of each 
semester. After that deadline, the assis- 
tant \ice president for student affairs 
must approve any change requests. The 
diner is permitted to use four meals in 
one day and may combine up to two 
meals per meal zone to convert to the 
meal/cash allowance. Diners may use five 
of their meals per semester for a guest. 
The RAM 6 CARD will serve as a ticket to 
the offerings at Lawrence Food Court, 



I'ecs and Expenses 



Campus Corner, Convenience Stores, 
and Sykes Ram's Head Food Court. 

RAM e CARD Fees. The University 
charges a $10 tee to issue a R.\i\l 6 CARD 
to each full- or part-time student. If this 
card is lost, stolen, or damaged, the stu- 
dent will be charged $10 for a replace- 
ment card. This fee is payable at the 
Student Services, Inc. (SSI) ser\'ice cen- 
ter located on the ground level of Sykes 
Student Union. 

Late Registration Fee 

Graduate students are not automatically 
granted permission to schedule after the 
deadline; however, a late registration fee 
of $35 is required of students who 
receive approval to schedule and pay 
after the official registration deadline. 

Late Payment Fee 

Students who fail to pay or submit their 
semester bills by their due date will be 
assessed a $50 late payment fee. 
Nonreceipt of a bill does not relieve stu- 
dents of the responsibility of paying 
their bill by the due date. For those pay- 
ing by mail, please allow sufficient time 
for payment to reach the University by 
the due date. Financial aid students who 
fail to confirm their attendance by the 
due date, even if no payment is due, will 
also be liable for this fee. 

Course Audit Fee 

Students who audit a course (attend a 
course without taking credit) pay the 
same fees as other students. 

Payment of Fees 

Fall semester bills should be received by 
mid July. Spring semester bills should be 
received by the first week of December. 
Students who do not receive a bill should 
contact the Office of the Bursar at 610- 
436-2552. It is each student's responsibil- 
ity to pay/submit the semester bill by the 
due date. Nonreceipt of a semester bill 
docs not relieve the student of the 
responsibility of paying/submitting the 
bill by the due date. Address changes 
should be made through the Office of 
the Registrar to allow for sufficient time 
to reflect an accurate billing address. 
Students who are receiving approved 
financial aid awards that fiiUy cover or 
exceed the amount of their bills do not 
have to pay, but they must submit to the 
Office of the Bursar the appropriate por- 
tion of their semester bill to complete reg- 
istration. Failure to return the bill, even if 
no payment is due, may result in the can- 



cellation of registration/schedule and 
the assessment of late penalties. Students 
who cannot pay their bills in full by the 
due date may apply for partial payment 
(see "Partial Payment Policv" below). 
Failure to meet the payment deadlines 
could result in cancellation of the stu- 
dent's schedule. In order to have the 
schedule reinstated, the student would 
have to pay his or her bill in full as well 
as a $35 late registration fee. 
Students who owe money to the 
University will have a hold placed on 
their accounts. If not satisfied, this hold 
will cancel registration/scheduling for 
future semesters, prevent the release of 
transcripts, and prohibit graduation 
clearance. The University also may, at its 
discretion, invoke any other penalty 
appropriate for a particular case in 
which money is owed to the University. 

Partial Payment Policy 

The University extends partial payment 
privileges to all students who are in good 
financial standing and have not defaulted 
on a previous payment plan. The fee 
charged for this service is $35 per fall 
and spring semester. For more informa- 
tion about the plan offered, contact the 
Office of the Bursar at 610-436-2552. 

Billing Address Changes 

If a student's billing address changes 
during enrollment at the Universit)', the 
new address must be given to the Office 
of Graduate Studies to avoid delayed 
deUvery of bills. 

Uncollectible Check Policy 

A tee of $25 is charged for any check 
returned to the University for insuffi- 
cient fiinds, stopped payment, or closed 
account. The University may, at its dis- 
cretion, charge this fee for any check 
returned to it for any other reason. 
The check will be returned to the student 
upon its replacement through cash, 
cashier's check, MasterCard, Visa, 
American Ejqpress, or money order. 
Students who have two or more checks 
returned against their accounts will no 
longer be able to m;ikc payment by per- 
sonal check; all fijturc payments must be 
made by cash, certified check, MasterCard, 
Visa, American Express, or money order. 

Transcript Fee 

The tee tor transcripts is $3 per copy. 
Transcript request forms are available in 
the Office of the Registrar. Immediate 
transcripts are $5 per request. 



Music Instrument Rental Fees 

Each student renting a musical instru- 
ment for a semester is charged $20 per 
instrument. Every student using a pipe 
organ for practice for one period each 
weekday is charged $36 per semester. 

Withdrawal Procedure 

Students who wish to withdraw from the 
Universit)' after pa}ang their semester or 
summer session fees must follow the offi- 
cial vinthdrawal procedure. Forms to 
withdraw from the University are avail- 
able in the Office of Graduate Studies. 
Completed forms must be returned to 
that office during the semester or sum- 
mer session when the withdrawal occurs. 

Refund Policy 

All requests for refunds for dropped or 
canceled courses, or for withdrawals, 
must be made in writing or in person to 
the Office of the Registrar. Refunds are 
not automatic; it is the student's respon- 
sibility to initiate a refund request. 
Appeals concerning the refund policy 
for tuition and the general fee are made 
to the Office of the Registrar. Appeals 
concerning the Housing or Meal Fee are 
made to the Office of Residence Life. 
Further appeals, if necessary, may be 
made to the Appeals Committee. 
Individual fees will be refijnded accord- 
ing to the poUcies described below. 
Tuition and General Fee Refunds - Full 
refiinds arc available only through the 
first day that the University is in session. 
After that, tuition and fees are reflinded 
according to the schedule below. These 
percentages apply to the total tuition bill, 
not to partial payments of tuition. 
Questions about this as well as when you 
will receive your refijnd should be direct- 
ed to the Office of the Bursar. 
Withdraw during Receive tuition and 

general fees refund 
Prior to session 100% 

1st day of semester 100% 

days 2-5 of 1st week of semester 90% 

2nd week of semester 80% 

3rd week of semester 70% 

4th week of semester 60% 

5tli week of semester 50% 

6tii week of semester and after No refund 

Housing Fee - in ftiU prior to the first 
day of the semester; after the first day of 
the semester, prorated refunds are made 
on an individual basis through the 
Office of Residence Lite. 
Meal Fee - in full prior to the first day 
of the semester; after the first day of the 
semester, prorated refunds are made on 
an individual basis through the Office of 



Financial Aid 



Residence Lite tor resident stialcnts, 
and through the Ot'tlcc of the Bursar for 
commuter students. 

Application Fee 

A nonrefundable graduate student appli- 
cation tec ot $35 is assessed to all stu- 
dents applying to the graduate program. 
If a nondegrce graduate student (a grad- 
uate stu"dent not yet officially admitted 
to the degree program) applies, he/she 
will pay this tec upon initi.d application 
to take a graduate course. He/she will 
not be assessed this fee again once offi- 
cially admitted to the degree program. 

Commencement Fee 

The University charges $56 to all stu- 
dents enrolled in a degree program who 
will have fulfilled their degree require- 
ments by the end of the semester. The fee 
is payable to the Office of the Bursar and 
should accompany a graduation applica- 
tion form from the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education. 

Parking Fee 

The University charges a nonrefundable 
parking fee to students who are eligible 
to purchase a permit to use University 
parking lots. The current parking fee is 
$30 per year. Registration forms are 
available at the Department of Public 
Safety. A violation of University parking 
regulations may result in a fine of 
$10-$40 based on the parking violation. 



Identification Card Fees 

The University charges a $10 fee to 
issue an identification card to each fiill- 
or part-time student. If this card is lost, 
stolen, or damaged, the student will be 
charged $10 for a replacement card. 
This fee is payable at the Student 
Services Inc. (SSI) service center located 
on the ground level of Sykes Union. 

International Student Services Fee 

International students are assessed a fee 
of $25 per semester to support the serv- 
ices provided to them by the Office of 
Internationa] Programs. 

Fees for Crossover Registration 

Students who are admitted to graduate 
study and need to take undergraduate 
course work to correct academic deficien- 
cies are advised to enroU in undergraduate 
courses exclusively, and they will be billed 
undergraduate fees. Graduate students 
who are enrolled in graduate and under- 
graduate courses during the same semes- 
ter will pay graduate fees for all course 
work. Further, all such courses or combi- 
nations are to appear on a single graduate 
transcript that includes a code or legend 
which differentiates between undergradu- 
ate and graduate courses. Undergraduate 
courses appearing on a graduate transcript 
may or may not be acceptable for a degree 
program, according to determinations 
made by the degree-granting department. 



Undergraduate students witii at least a 
3.00 GPA and 96 credits of course work 
may take up to six credits of graduate 
course work in their final semester in 
accordance with University policy. If the 
student wishes to have the credits count 
towards the bachelor's degree, he/she 
must submit a completed "Application for 
an Undergraduate Student to Take a 
Graduate Course for Undergraduate 
Credit." If the student wishes to have the 
credits count towards a graduate degree, 
he/she must submit a completed 
"Application for an Undergraduate 
Student to Take a Graduate Course for 
Graduate Credit." Both forms are avail- 
able in the Office of the Registrar. To 
receive graduate-level credit, the student 
also must submit a properly completed 
and approved Graduate School 
Application for Admission form to the 
Office of Graduate Studies before com- 
pleting the appropriate form. 
If a course is taken for undergraduate credit 
by an undergraduate student, no additional 
fees will be required. If a course is taken for 
graduate credit, the student must pay grad- 
uate tuition and applicable fees for that 
course. Credit earned and grades received 
will be recorded on the undergraduate 
transcript. Credits so earned may later be 
applied to a graduate program, subject to 
approval of the major department. 



Financial Aid 



The purpose of financial aid at West Chester University is to pro- 
vide financial assistance and counseling to students who can bene- 
fit from fiirther education, but who cannot obtain it without such 
assistance. Financial assistance consists of gift aid in the form of 
scholarships or grants and self-help aid in the form of employ- 
ment or loans. The main responsibility for meeting educational 
expenses rests with students. Financial aid is a supplement to fam- 
ily contributions and is to be used for educational expenses. 
Eligibilit)' for financial aid, with the exception of some assist- 
antships and scholarships, is based on demonstrated financial 
need. Family income, assets, and family size influence the 
demonstrated financial need of the student. 
All documents, correspondence, and conversations among the 
aid applicant, his or her family, and the Office of Financial Aid 
are confidential and entided to the protection ordinarily arising 
from a counsehng relationship. 
In order to receive need-based financial aid, the student must: 



1. Meet enrollment requirements for the specific aid program 
and must be making satisfactory academic progress. See the 
Office of Financial Aid for a more detailed explanation of 
this requirement. 

2. Submit a Free AppUcation for Federal Student Aid before 
March 1 for priorit}' consideration. All students, regardless 
of state residency status, must complete this form in order 
to be considered for Bnancial aid at West Chester 
University. This apphcation will be used to determine 
demonstrated financial need for the student. AH students 
are encouraged to complete this apphcation. 

3. Submit any other requested documentation concerning 
financial and family circumstances that may be requested by 
the Office of Financial Aid, or any agency that administers 
financial assistance programs. 

The submission of the information described above does not 
automatically entide a student to receive financial aid. The 
Office of Financial Aid follows the regulations estabhshed by 



Financial Aid 



the tcdcral government in awarding aid. Aid applicants are 
ranked according to unmet need (based on budget, federal and 
state grants, and expected family contribution), and available 
fiinds are offered to the neediest students first. Students must 
apply for financial aid each academic year. 



Direct questions concerning financial aid to the Office of 
Financial Aid, 138 Elsie O. Bull Center, West Chester 
University, West Chester, PA 19383, 610-436-2627. Office 
hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, 8 a.m. to 
4:30 p.m.; and Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 



Withdrawal/Enrollment 
Change and Aid 

Students who officially withdraw or 
change their enrollment status may be 
entided to a rcfiind of certain fees, in 
accordance with University policy. (See 
section entided "Fees and Expenses.") If 
the student has been awarded financial aid 
for the semester in which the withdrawal 
or enrollment change occurs, a portion of 
the reflind will be returned to financial aid 
program funds. Financial aid refiinds due 
to withdrawals or enrollment changes are 
processed in accordance with federal, state, 
and awarding agency guidelines and regu- 
lations. A student considering withdrawal 
or an enrollment status change should 
consult the Office of Financial Aid to 
determine the impact of that action on 
current and future financial aid. 

Student Consumer Rights and 
Responsibilities 

You have the right to ask a school: 

1. The names of its accrediting organ- 
izations. 

2. About its programs; its instruction- 
al, laboratory, and other physical 
facilities; and its faculty. 

3. The cost of attendance and its policies 
on refiinds to students who drop out. 

4. What financial assistance is avail- 
able, including information on all 
federal, state, local, private, and 
institutional financial aid programs. 

5. What the procedures and deadlines 
are for submitting applications for 
each available financial aid program. 

6. What criteria it uses to select finan- 
cial aid recipients. 

7. How it determines your financial 
need. This process includes how 
costs for tuition and fees, room and 
board, travel, books and supplies, 
personal and miscellaneous expenses, 
etc., are considered in your budget. It 
also includes what resources (such as 
parental contribution, other financial 
aid, your assets, etc.) are considered 
in the calculation of your need. 

8. If you have a loan, you have the right 
to know what the interest rate is, the 
total amount that must be repaid, the 



length of time you have to repay the 
loan, when you must start repaying 
it, and any cancellation and defer- 
ment provisions that apply. 

9. If you are offered a work study job, 
you have the right to know what 
kind of job it is, what hours you 
must work, what your duties will 
be, what the rate of pay will be, and 
how and when you will be paid. 

10. To reconsider your aid package, if 
you believe a mistake has been made. 

11. How the school determines 
whether you are making satisfactory 
academic progress and what hap- 
pens if you are not. 

12. What special facilities and services 
are available to the disabled. 

You have the responsibility to: 

1. Review and consider all informa- 
tion about a school's program 
before you enroll. 

2. Pay special attention to your applica- 
tion for student financial aid, com- 
plete it accurately, and submit it on 
time to the right place. Errors can 
delay your receipt of financial aid. 

3. Provide all additional documenta- 
tion, verification, corrections, 
and/or new information requested 
by either the Office of Financial 
Aid or the agency to which you 
submitted your application. 

4. Read and understand all forms that 
you are asked to sign and keep 
copies of them. 

5. Accept responsibility for the prom- 
issory note and all other agreements 
that you sign. 

6. If you have a loan, notify the lender 
of changes in your name, address, or 
enrollment status. 

7. Perform in a satisfactory manner 
the work that is agreed upon in 
accepting a college work study job. 

8. Know and comply with the dead- 
lines for application for aid. 

9. Know and comply with your 
school's refiind procedures. 

Federal Perkins Loan Program 

The Federal Perkins Loan Program is a 
cooperative effort of the federal govern- 



ment and West Chester University 
which enables qualified students to 
secure educational loans under attractive 
conditions. Each borrower must: 

1. Be enrolled or accepted in the insti- 
tution participating in the program. 

2. Demonstrate financial need. 

3. Maintain satisfactory academic 
progress in the curriculum. 

The combined total of undergraduate 
and graduate loans cannot exceed 
S40,000. Approval of loans depends on 
the student's financial need and the 
availability of loan hands. The Free 
Application for Federal Student Aid 
must be filed. For fijrther information 
contact the director of financial aid. 

Federal Stafford Loan 

The Federal Stafford Loan is a coopera- 
tive effort of private lending institutions 
and the state and federal governments 
which enables qualified students to 
secure long-term educational loans. 
To be eligible for a loan, a student must: 

1. Be accepted for enrollment in an 
approved institution or, if enrolled, be 
making satisfactory academic progress. 

2. Be classified as at least a half-time 
student. 

The maximum loan per academic year for 
graduate students is $18,500 (combined 
subsidized and unsubsidized) or the cost 
of the education, whichever is less; no 
more than $8,5(X) of this total loan 
amount may be subsidized. The total max- 
imum indebtedness for all years of under- 
graduate and graduate study is $65,500 
subsidized and $73,000 unsubsidized. 

Graduate Assistantships 

A hmited number of graduate assistant- 
ships are available to qualified, fiill-time 
and part-time graduate students. 
Interested students should consult their 
department chairperson or graduate 
coordinator and the Office of Graduate 
Studies to determine the availability of 
assistantships and their own eligibility. 
Notification for the first round of 
awards will be made by May 15. Many 
assistantships become available after this 
date or at the beginning of spring 
semester. To be eligible to receive a 



l-inaiuial Ai^ 



graduate assistantship, the student must 
satisfy the following requirements: 

1. Must he a fully matriculated, degree- 
seeking, graduate student; normally, 
certification students arc not eligible, 
and provisionally accepted students 
are not eligible unless the provisions 
are removed before the semester 
begins. Exceptions must be approved 
by the graduate dean. 

2. Have a minimum cumulative GPA of 
3.0 for current graduate students (if a 
graduating senior, the undergraduate 
GPA must be at least 2.75). 

3. Must submit a statement of profes- 
sional goals, three letters of recom- 
mendation (using the form provided 
by the Graduate Office). 

4. Have applied tor a graduate assist- 
antship by April 15 to be eligible for 
a fall semester assistantship, or by 
October 15 for a spring semester 
assistantship. 

Assignments are made by the department 
in which the assistantship is located and 
may involve part-time undergraduate 
teaching, participation in research proj- 
ects, or other professional duties under 
faculty supervision. Applications are avail- 
able in the Office of Graduate Studies. 
Full-time graduate assistants, in return for 
20 hours of assigned duties per week, 
receive tuition remission and a stipend of 
$5,000 for the academic year and must be 
enrolled as fiill-time graduate students 
(9-15 credits). Half-time assistantships 
involving 10 hours per week of assign- 
ments also are available. For these, students 
enroll in six credits of course work and will 
receive tuition remission for those credits 
as well as a stipend of S2,500 for the aca- 
demic year. Full-time graduate assistants 
are not allowed to hold other on-campus 
employment simultaneously. Part-time 
graduate assistants may work on-campus a 
maximum ot 10 hours per week in addi- 
tion to holding an assistantship. 
For maximum consideration for support, 
applications for the fall semester should 
be submitted by April 15, although 
some departments occasionally consider 
assistantship applications at later dates. 
Assistantships also are offered by the 
Academic Programs and Services 
Division, Residence Life and Housing, 
the Academic Computing Center, and 
other offices. Please contact these 
offices, the adviser and/or graduate 
coordinator of your academic program, 
or the Office of Graduate Studies for 
additional information. 



Maintaining graduate assistantships 
requires students to demonstrate both 
satisfactory performance in meeting 
assigned hours, dates, and responsibility, 
as well as good academic standing. 
Students holding graduate assistantships 
who fail to maintain good academic 
standing (minimum GPA of 3.0) will 
have their assistantships revoked or will 
not have them renewed. This policy 
includes courses taken during summer 
sessions. Departments also may stipulate 
higher academic standards for maintain- 
ing assistantships. Full-time graduate 
assistantships are given for a maximum of 
four semesters. Half-time assistantships 
may be granted for up to eight semesters. 

Frederick Douglass Graduate 
Assistantships 

These graduate assistantships are named 
after Frederick Douglass, a great nine- 
teenth-century American abolitionist and 
writer and a frequent visitor to West 
Chester. Douglass gave his last public 
lecture at West Chester Normal School 
on February 1, 1895. Applicants with 
excellent academic credentials may apply 
for these assistantships. Efforts are made 
to appoint qualified candidates from his- 
torically underrepresented and under- 
served populations who have leadership 
experiences in their backgrounds or as 
part of their academic goals. This consid- 
eration is in keeping wath the spirit of 
Douglass' life of public service and the 
UniversiU's mission to be a source of 
encouragement to the African American, 
Native American, Hispanic American, 
and Asian American communities. 
Students with Frederick Douglass gradu- 
ate assistantships serve the Frederick 
Douglass Institute. These are ftiU-time 
(20 hours per week) assistantships that 
provide a tuition waiver and S5,000 
stipend for the academic vear. The 
awards are made on an annual basis and 
are renewable for a second year. Students 
may use these assistantships to pursue a 
master's degree in one of the University's 
graduate programs. Interested individuals 
with excellent credentials should contact 
the Office of Graduate Studies and 
Extended Education, McKelvie Hall, 
102 Rosedale Ave., 610-436-2943. 

Residence Hall Graduate 

Assistants 

Opportunities to serve as residence hall 
graduate assistants are open to all fiiU- 
time graduate students. Graduate assis- 
tants live in the University residence 



halls and assist the Rill-time, professional 
resident director in providing direction 
for the personal, social, and educational 
development of the resident students. 
Residence life graduate assistants are also 
supervisors for student workers and serve 
as University judicial hearing officers. 
These positions are fiill-time (25 hours a 
week) graduate assistantships that offer a 
stipend, tuition remission, and room and 
meal plan. Preference is given to stu- 
dents enrolled in a counseling or psy- 
chology program and to those with prior 
residence hall living experience. 
Applications may be made through the 
Office of Residence Life and Housing, 
Sykes Student Union, 610-436-3307. 

Institute for Women Graduate 
Grant 

The Institute for Women at West 
Chester University offers an annual grant 
of $750 to a woman graduate student 
who is accepted into a master's degree 
program at West Chester University. The 
award is based on high academic achieve- 
ment; evidence of potential for contribu- 
tion to the applicant's field of study; a 
record of leadership in school, communi- 
ty, church, or other setting; and evidence 
of service to others. Applications, includ- 
ing reference forms, are available from the 
Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education. Completed materials must be 
submitted by March 15. Only students 
who have filed all required admission cre- 
dentials and plan to enroll for a minimum 
of six graduate credits are eligible. 

Federal Work Study 

Graduate students may apply through 
the Office of Financial Aid for 
Universiu' or federal work study funds. 
The Free Application for Federal 
Student Aid also must be filed. 

Kinesiology (Physical Education) 
Department Scholarship 

One $300 scholarship is awarded to a 
graduate student in kinesiolog)'. 
Applications should be- submitted to the 
chairperson. Department of Kinesiology. 

Special Education Department 
Scholarship 

The Department of Special Education 
offers a scholarship of $500 to be 
awarded annually to a select, nontradi- 
tional student. The award is made possi- 
ble through the Military Order of the 
Purple Heart, a veterans' organization 




Acjilcinii. Inforiiuition and RoKul.ition- 



chartered by Congress tor armed forces 
personnel wounded in combat. 
iNotificatlon of the award will be made 
bv March 1 of each year. Applications 
and tiirther information are available 
from the chairperson, Department of 
Special Education. 

Professor Russell Sturzebecker 
Scholarship 

Professor Russell Sturzebecker 
Scholarships of at least $1,000 are made 
each semester to "worthy and needy" 
graduate students injiealth and physical 
education. Through the generosit)' ot 
Mr. John Unruh, the awards are donated 
in honor of Professor Sturzebecker. 
Each recipient must be working Rill 
time in the field of health and physical 
education and must be a part-time stu- 
dent at West Chester University work- 
ing towards a master's degree in his or 
her professional field. 
Graduate students who meet the criteria 
are invited to submit a letter of application 
for the scholarship along with a resume of 
their professional and academic status. 
These documents should be submitted to 
the chairperson of the Department of 
Kinesiolog)' before November 15 for the 
fu-st semester, and before March 15 for the 
second semester. Selections will be made 
by a committee of three graduate faculty 
members of the Department of Health 
and the Department of Kinesiology. 
Application forms are available from the 
Department of Kinesiology. 



Grace Cochran Research on 
Women Award 

An annual $100 award in each division, 
graduate and undergraduate, is given for 
the best research on women. The award, 
sponsored by the Institute for Women, 
is given on Research on Women Day 
held in the spring of each year. Dr. 
Cochran, an eminent teacher and schol- 
ar, graduated from the West Chester 
Normal School in 1906. 

Dr. Charles S. Swope 
Scholarship Foundation 

The Memorial Scholarship Trust 
Foundation was established by Charles 
E. Swope and Richard M. Swope in 
memory of Dr. and Mrs. Charles S. 
Swope. Dr. Swope served as president of 
West Chester University for a quarter of 
a century. Applicants must be enrolled 
full time and be graduates of West 
Chester University. Scholarships are 
$1,000 each. Applications must be filed 
on or before April 1. Selection is made 
during May, with scholarships com- 
mencing in September. 

Charles Mayo Scholarship 

A financial grant is awarded yearly 'to an 
upperclass or graduate student in political 
science in memory of Charles Mayo, for- 
mer president of West Chester University. 
Funded by contributions, the award is 
administered by facult)' of the Depart- 
ment of Political Science. The value of 
the scholarship is approximately $200. 



Sharon H. Ennis Graduate 
Study Scholarship 

This fund was established in memory of 
Dr. Sharon H. Ennis, associate vice 
president for information services at 
West Chester University in 1998. To be 
eligible, an applicant must be a female 
M.B.A. student with a concentration in 
technolog)' and electronic commerce 
who strives to be versed in management, 
business, e-commerce, computer tech- 
nology, the Internet, telecommunica- 
tions, and related emerging technolo- 
gies. In addition, an applicant must have 
a GPA of 3.0 or higher and have com- 
pleted 12-15 credits at West Chester 
Universit)'. Consideration will be given 
to candidates with financial need. A 
committee comprised of M.B.A. faculty 
and chaired by the dean of graduate 
studies will choose the recipient. 

Greater West Chester Chamber 
of Commerce M.B.A./James 
Hamilton Scholarship 

Established by the West Chester 
Chamber of Commerce, this scholarship 
is awarded to an M.B.A. student who has 
resided in the greater West Chester area 
for at least the pre\aous 12 months. 
Candidates should have completed a min- 
imum of nine graduate credits with a 3.0 
GPA or better. A committee comprised of 
M.B.A. faculty will choose the recipient. 



Academic Information and Regulations 



Applicable Catalog Year 

All students are bound by the Graduate 
Catalog in the year they are admitted to 
the University under one of the matricu- 
lated student categories (see below under 
"Classification of Students"). Students 
are bound by the requirements in the 
Graduate Catalog at the time that they 
are admitted to the degree or certificate 
or teacher certification or professional 
growth program. If a student is admitted 
more than once, the year of the most 
recent admission is applicable. If any of 
the requirements for the program change 
while students are matriculating, they 



may. but do not have to, meet the 
changed requirements. In some 
instances, accrediting and/or certification 
standards necessitate the change in the 
degree or certificate or teacher certifica- 
tion program requirements. In such situ- 
afions, the respective school or college 
will formally inform each student that he 
or she must meet the new requirements. 
Readmitted students are bound by the 
requirements in place at the time of 
readmission, except where permission for 
change in requirements or exception has 
been granted by the respective depart- 
ment and the dean of graduate studies 
and extended education. 



Time to Complete the Degree 
Program 

All requirements for the master's degree, 
including courses, comprehensive exam- 
inations, and thesis, must be completed 
within six years of admission to the 
degree program. 

See also "Degree Candidacy" and 
"Degree Requirements." 

Classification of Students 

Students arc classified as follows: 

A. Matriculated Students 

1. Full matriculation, granted to a stu- 
dent who meets all admission 
requirements. 



Academic Information and Regulations 



2. Provisional matriculation, which may 
be granted to a student who: 

a. Has not taken the Graduate 
Record Examination, the Miller 
Analogies Test, or a specialized 
entrance examination required by 
the department concerned. 

b. Is unable to present all prerequi- 
sites required by the department. 

Students must fulfill the conditions 
stipulated in their provisional accept- 
ance by the time that application to 
degree candidacy is made. Credit 
earned as a provisional degree stu- 
dent may be accepted toward the 
degree only on recommendation of 
the student's adviser. 
Note: Some programs do not grant 
provisional matriculation. 

3. Teacher certification, which applies to 
students taking course work to gain 
teacher certification. 

4. Certiftcate programs, which applies to 
students taking course work to earn 
advanced certificates in program con- 
centrations. 

5. Professional growth, for students who 
take graduate course work but seek 
neither a degree nor certification. 

B. Nondegree Students 

A nondegree student may be admitted 
to take a workshop or other credit-bear- 
ing class. Nondegree students may 
schedule up to nine credits of course 
work on a nonmatriculated basis. 
Students taking courses under this poli- 
cy are expected to meet the minimum 
GPA required for graduate work and 
may need to seek permission prior to 
enrolling. Taking courses on a nonde- 
gree basis does not guarantee admission 
and credits earned may not necessarily 
be appUed to a degree program at a later 
date. Additional course work may be 
taken only after the student has applied 
and been accepted as a matriculated stu- 
dent into one of the categories described 
above. Students taking only special 
courses, such as workshops, are the 
exception to this rule. 
Courses taken under nondegree status 
may not necessarily be appUed to degree 
programs at a later date. Students 
should begin the formal application 
process immediately after they have 
decided to pursue a graduate degree at 
West Chester University. 



Registration 

All active graduate students (those who 
have maintained continuous enrollment), 
nondegree students who have attended 
within the past year, and newly accepted 
students will receive scheduling materials 
and registration instructif)ns by mail. 
Materials for summer and fall semesters 
are usually available in early March, and 
for spring semester in October. Students 
who anticipate receiving materials but do 
not receive them should contact the 
Office of Graduate Studies. 

Active Status 

See policy on Continuous Enrollment. 

Continuous Enrollment 

To remain in good standing, graduate 
students must maintain continuous 
enrollment (i.e., one or more semester 
hours each fall and spring) from the 
semester of matriculation through the 
semester of graduation. The only excep- 
tion is for students on a leave of 
absence. AH graduate students who have 
been admitted into a graduate program 
must maintain continuous registration 
each semester (except summer sessions), 
or must apply for a formal leave of 
absence. Graduate students who do not 
wish to register for formal course work, 
but who desire to maintain continuous 
enrollment, must register for GSR799, 
a noncredit registration category used 
to record the fact of continuous enroll- 
ment. Graduate students are not 
required to maintain matriculation dur- 
ing the summer sessions unless they 
intend to complete their final degree 
requirements during this period. 
With the approval of the graduate coordi- 
nator and the dean of graduate studies, a 
leave of absence may be granted for a 
minimum of one calendar year. Leave of 
absence forms mav be obtained from the 
Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education. A leave of absence does not 
extend the six-year time limit for comple- 
tion of all degree requirements. 
Unless a graduate student is granted a 
leave of absence, he or she is ineligible to 
return until readmitted. A formal appli- 
cation for readmission must be complet- 
ed and submitted to the Office of 
Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education. Forms are available in 
Graduate Studies. 

Readmission 

Readmission is not automatic and may 
be subject to additional conditions set 



by the department, school or college, or 
by the graduate dean. 

Advisory System 

All students will be assigned an adviser in 
the program of their chosen major. 
Students must comply with all program 
or department advising and scheduling 
procedures, and are expected to meet with 
their advisers at least once each semester 
during the course scheduling period. 

Graduate Level Course 
Numbering System 

500-series graduate level courses to 
which advanced undergraduates may 
be admitted 
600-series graduate courses not normally 

open to undergraduates 
Course numbering within a series is at 
the discretion of the department offer- 
ing the courses. 

Undergraduate Courses for 
Graduate Credit 

Some departments have identified 
selected undergraduate courses that may 
be taken by graduate students (under 
departmental advisement) for graduate 
credit. No more than six credits of 
specifically designated 400-level courses 
may be applied to the awarding of the 
graduate degree. See departmental list- 
ings. All undergraduate credits, even 
those applied towards a graduate degree 
or certificate or certification program, 
will not be certified as graduate credit by 
the Office of Graduate Studies for any 
reason (e.g., notification to employer, or 
transfer of credits to another institution). 

Workshops 

The number 598 following the depart- 
mental prefix indicates an "open" work- 
shop that allows the departments to 
offer a variet)' of short-term seminars in 
specific subjects under this designation. 
Such workshops may or may not carry 
credit in a graduate degree program. 

Condensed Format Courses 

A condensed format course is any course 
that meets the normal number of hours 
per credit but which meets in a shorter 
time frame than one week per credit 
granted. The number of contact hours 
needed to earn a credit in a condensed 
format course minimally must comply 
vnxh the contact standards set down by 
national undergraduate and graduate 
accrediting agencies. No more than two 



Acadcmli: Infnrni.ition and Rci;iil.itii)ns 



courses designated as "condensed format" 
may count toward a graduate degree. 

Enrollment Classification 

Full-time students must enroll in 9-15 
course credit hours. Part-time students 
enroll for fewer than nine course credit 
hours. 

Generally, students may take a maxi- 
mum of 12 credits during the summer 
sessions. Exceptions to this policy must 
be approved by the dean of graduate 
studies and extended education. 

Course Credit by Examination 

Credit by examination may not be taken 
for graduate course work. 

Pass/Fail Grades 

The pass/tail option is not available to 
graduate students for graduate or under- 
graduate courses. 

Transferring Credit from Other 
Institutions 

West Chester students who wish to take 
course work at other institutions for 
credit at West Chester University must 
obtain approval from their chairperson 
or graduate coordinator and the dean of 
graduate studies and extended education 
prior to enrollment. Other restrictions 
and requirements are the same as those 
given in "Transfer of Credit," page 6. 

Change of Status 

A provisional degree student who has met 
the various conditions stipulated at the 
time of admission may petition for fiill 
graduate standing by completing the 
change of status form available in the 
Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education. Credit earned as a provisional 
degree student or as a nondegree student 
may be accepted in a degree program only 
on the recommendation of the student's 
adviser. Provisional degree students 
should consult their advisers well in 
advance in order to select work appropri- 
ate for transfer toward the degree. 

Changing to Auditor Status 

Before the end of the add period, a stu- 
dent may apply to become an auditor by 
completing a change in class status form 
available in the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education and by 
obtaining the necessary approval. 

Changes in Program 

In order to change from one degree pro- 
gram to another, a student must submit 



an application to the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education. The 
student must meet all specific admission 
requirements of the program for which 
the change is requested and receive the 
approval of the program coordinator. No 
fee is charged. 

Adding a Course 

Students may add a course by filing a 
Schedule Change Form in the Office of 
Graduate Studies and Extended Educa- 
tion only during the schedule change 
period and after obtaining approval from 
their program adviser or graduate coor- 
dinator, and the dean of graduate studies 
and extended education. 

Dropping a Course 

A. During the first week of a semester, 
or the equivalent time in summer 
sessions, a student may drop a course, 
thereby receiving no grade, by filing a 
Schedule Change Form in or the 
Office of Graduate Studies and 
Extended Education during the 
schedule change period. 

B. A grade of W wUl be entered on the 
academic record of any student who 
drops a course between the end of the 

first week and before the end of the ninth 
class week or the equivalent in summer 
sessions. Course withdrawal forms are 
available in the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education. 
If a student is only scheduled for one 
course, then withdrawal from the course 
at any time is considered a withdrawal 
from the University. 

Withdrawal from Courses in 
Summer Sessions 

Students wishing to withdraw from 
summer sessions should foUow the same 
procedure for withdrawal from a course. 
Withdrawal deadlines are adjusted 
appropriately in accordance with the 
summer calendar. 

Withdrawal from the University 

Students wishing to withdraw from the 
University must contact the Office of 
Graduate Studies and Extended Educa- 
tion and follow the prescribed proce- 
dures. If illness or some other emer- 
gency interrupts the student's work, he 
or she must notify the Office of the 
Graduate Studies and P'xtended Educa- 
tion Immediately. Unless a student with- 
draws officially, F grades will be record- 
ed for unfinished courses. 



Leave of Absence 

Students in a degree program who wiU 
not be registering for course work during 
the fall or spring semesters should either 
schedule GSR 799 (Continuous Regis- 
tration) or file a request for a leave of 
absence with the dean of graduate studies 
and extended education. A leave of 
absence may be granted for a minimum of 
one calendar year. The request should be 
filed in advance of the semester in which 
course work is halted. Approved leaves of 
absence do not release the student from 
the six-year time limitation stipulated for 
the completion of degree requirements. 
Leave of absence request forms may be 
obtained from the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education. 

Grading System 

The following grading system applies to 
graduate students: 

Grade Definitions: 

Quality 

Grade Points Interpretation 

A 4.00 Superior graduate attainment 

A- 3.67 

B+ 3.33 Satisfactory graduate attainment 

B 3.00 

B- 2.67 

C+ 2.33 Attainment below graduate 

C 2.00 expectations 

C- 1.67 

F Failure 

NG No Grade 

W Withdrawal 

Y Administrative Withdrawal 
AU Audit 

West Chester University does not recog- 
nize a grade of D for graduate study. 
Therefore, any grade below a C- in a 
graduate course is considered a failure 
and carries zero quality points. 
NG (No Grade) is given when a student 
fails to complete course requirements by 
the end of a semester and a time exten- 
sion is granted by the instructor; see "Re- 
moving 'No Grade' Designation" below. 
W (Withdrawal) is given when a stu- 
dent withdraws from a course between 
the end of the first and the end of the 
ninth class week of the semester or the 
equivalent in summer sessions. 

Y (Administrative Withdrawal) is given 
under appeal when there are nonacade- 
mic mitigating circumstances, and there 
is documentation that the student never, 
in fact, attended class. 

Course Repeat Policy 

Graduate students may repeat up to two 
courses, which are being applied to their 
degree, and for which they have received 



Academic Information and kcpilations 



a grade ot C+, C, or C-. Courses may be 
repeated only once. Both grades received 
for a course will remain on the student's 
record, and both grades will be used to 
calculate the cumulative and major aver- 
ages. Receipt of any C+, C, or C- grade 
applies toward the probation and dis- 
missal policy. Repeating a course does 
not increase the limit on the number of 
C's that may be earned before academic 
dismissal occurs. 

This policy ;dso applies to courses taken 
at the undergraduate level and applied 
to the graduate degree or certificate or 
teacher certification program, or taken 
as a prerequisite for the program. 

Removing "No Grade" 
Designation 

Students must complete courses for which 
they have received a No Grade (NG) by 
the completion date stipulated by the 
instructor no later than the eighth week of 
the second regular (fall or spring) semester 
after the semester in which they received 
the NG. Students who do not meet this 
requirement will have a hold placed on 
their record, and they wiU be prevented 
from registering until the work is com- 
pleted. This requirement does not apply to 
independent study, thesis, research report, 
practicum, or recital credit. 

Grade Change Policy 

A grade awarded other than NG is final. 
Final grades can be changed only when 
there is a clerical or computational error. 
If the student thinks there is an error, 
the student must report the alleged error 
in writing to the professor as soon as 
possible, but no later than the end of the 
fifth week of the following semester. If a 
grade change is warranted, the professor 
must submit a change of grade request 
to the Office of the Registrar not later 
than the end of the ninth week of the 
semester. Final grades cannot be 
changed after the ninth week of the 
semester following the alleged error. 

Grade Reports 

Grade reports are available to graduate 
students soon after the end of a semester 
or summer session on myWCU. Students 
are reminded to check their reports 
against grade requirements and other 
regulations, as well as for accuracy, and to 
have their grade reports available when 
consulting with advisers. Students need- 
ing a paper grade report for reimburse- 
ment purposes can submit the request 
form found on the Registrar's Web site. 



Grade Appeals 

Scope of the Policy 

The Cjrade Appeals Policy applies only 
to (juestions ot student evaluation. Since 
appeals involve questions of judgment, 
the Grade Appeals Board will not rec- 
ommend that a grade be revised in the 
student's favor unless there is clear evi- 
dence that the original grade was based 
upon prejudiced or capricious judgment, 
or was inconsistent with official 
University policy. In the case where the 
grade was based on a charge of cheating, 
the Academic Dishonesty Policy applies 
(see below). Academic dishonesty 
includes but is not limited to: 

1. Plagiarism, that is, copying another's 
work or portions thereof and/or using 
ideas and concepts of another and 
presenting them as one's own without 
giving proper credit to the source; 

2. Submitting work that has been pre- 
pared by another person; 

3. Using books or other materials with- 
out authorization while taking exam- 
inations; 

4. Taking an examination for another 
person, or allowing another person to 
take an examination in one's place; 

5. Copying from iuiother's paper during 
an examination or allowing another 
person to copy from one's own and/or 

6. Unauthorized access to an examina- 
tion prior to administration. 

Grade Appeals Procedure 

1. (a) A student must initiate an appeal 
in writing within 20 class days 
from the date of the decision or 
action in question. In case of an 
appeal of a final grade, the appeal 
must be filed no later than the first 
20 class days of the term following 
the one in which the grade was 
received. This written appeal 
should be sent to the instructor 
who awarded the grade in ques- 
tion. The appeal shall be received 
by the student and the faculty 
members. They shall mutually 
attempt to resolve the appeal with- 
in five class days from the receipt. 

1. (b) If the appeal is based on an interpre- 

tation of departmental or University 
polic)', the student's academic adviser 
may also be present during the 
re\iew process. In such case, there 
shall be a limit of five class days in 
which to resolve the appeal. 

2. An appeal not resolved at Step 1 shall 



be referred in writing by the student 
within five class days after the com- 
pletion of Step 1 to the chairperson of 
the department of which the course in 
question is a part. If there is a depart- 
mental appeals committee, the prob- 
lem shall be referred directly to it. The 
department chairperson or the depart- 
mental appeals committee shall nor- 
mally submit a written response to the 
student within 10 class days following 
receipt of the written statement of the 
problem. A copy of this response shall 
also be provided to the instructor. 

3. If no mutually satisfactory decision has 
been reached at Step 2, the student may 
submit a written appeal to the dean of 
the college or school in which the prob- 
lem originated. Such an appeal shall be 
made within five class days following 
the receipt of the written response of 
the department chairperson or the 
departmental appeals committee. The 
dean shall investigate the problem as 
presented in the written documenta- 
tion, review the recommendation and 
provide, in writing, a proposal for the 
solution of the problem within 10 class 
days following its referral. 

4. If the problem is not mutually resolved 
by Step 3, the student may file an 
appeal with the Grade Appeals Board 
within five class days of the receipt of 
the written proposal from the dean. 
The request for an appeal must be 
submitted to the associate provost or, if 
appropriate, to the dean of graduate 
studies who will convene the Grade 
Appeals Board as soon as possible, but 
no later than 15 class days after the 
receipt of the written request. 

Grade Appeals Board 

1. Membership 

A. The associate provost (or, if appro- 
priate, the dean of graduate studies 
and extended education) serves as 
nonvoting chairperson. If the associ- 
ate provost is not available to serve, 
the administtation will appoint a 
substitute mutuall}' acceptable to the 
student and the Association of 
Penns}'lvania State College and 
University Faculties (APSCUF). 

B. A faculty dean not involved in the 
appeals process. A substitute may 
be appointed as given in "A" above. 

C. Two faculty members. At the 
beginning of each academic year, 
the Office of the Associate Provost 
shall randomly select two fiill-time 
faculty from each academic depart- 



Academic Information and Regulations 



nicnt in order to constitute the 
pool. Two faculty- members from 
different departments will be ran- 
domly selected from this pool for 
each Appeals Board. 
D. Two undergraduate students or, it 
appropriate, two graduate students 
appointed by the president of the 
Student Government Association 
(SGA). 

2. Attendance 

A. The faculty member involved may 
be assisted by an adviser, an 
APSCUF representative, or the 
chairperson of the department in 
which the problem originated. 

B. The student involved may be 
assisted by an adviser. The adviser 
may be another student, an admin- 
istrator, or a faculty member. 

C. Such witnesses as are called on 
behalf of either the faculty member 
or the student. 

D. Resource persons or expert wit- 
nesses called at the request of the 
board. In the event that the deci- 
sion making involves knowledge of 
the discipline, the board shall be 
required to utilize at least one 
resource person from the discipline, 
an expert adviser(s) to aid them in 
their decision making. 

3. Procedure 

A. Preparation for the Hearing — All 
parties must be informed of the 
complaint in writing by the chair- 
person of the Grade Appeals Board 
(hereafter referred to as "chairper- 
son"), normally within five class 
days after the receipt of the com- 
plaint. Copies of documents and 
correspondence filed with respect 
to the complaint shall be provided 
to the interested parties through 
the chairperson. Thereafter, neither 
new evidence nor new charges shall 
be introduced before the board. 
The chairperson shall notify in 
writing the interested parties of the 
exact time and place of the hearing 
and shall provide existing Univer- 
sity and/or Commonwealth poli- 
cies relevant to the appeal at least 
five class days before the beginning 
of the proceedings. Throughout 
these proceedings, the burden of 
proof rests upon the person bring- 
ing the appeal. 

B. Hearing Procedure — During the 
hearing, both the faculty member 
and the student shall be accorded 
ample time for statements, testi- 



mony of witnesses, and presenta- 
tion of documents. 
C. Decision of the Appeals Board 

1. TTie Grade Appeals Board shall 
deliberate in executive session 
and render a decision by majori- 
ty vote within three days of the 
close of the hearing. The chair- 
person may participate in these 
deliberations but not vote. 

2. The chairperson shall notify, in 
writing, the student, the faculty 
member, and the department in 
which the course in question is 
located of the decision within 
three class days of the board's 
final action. The notification 
shall include the basis upon 
which the decision was reached. 

4. Other 

A. A written statement of the decision 
and relevant materials shall be 
placed in the student's academic file. 

B. A written statement of the decision 
and relevant materials shall be 
placed in the faculty member's file 
subject to the provisions of official 
Commonwealth policy governing 
personnel files. 

Notes 

1. Both faculty member and student are 
entitled to the right of challenge for 
cause of any member of the depart- 
ment committee (if used) and the 
Grade Appeals Board except the 
chairperson. In the case of challenge at 
the Appeals Board level, the chairper- 
son shall adjudicate the challenge. One 
challenge at each level is permitted. 

2. A "class day" is defined as any day 
when classes are officially in session at 
West Chester University. 

3. If the course in which the grade dis- 
pute occurred is offered under the 
auspices of a unit of the University 
other than an academic department, 
the program director/coordinator, 
head of that unit, and/or the depart- 
ment chairperson will fiinction in Step 
2 of the procedure. In Step 3, the 
appeal should then be made to the 
associate provost rather than the dean 
of the college/school. 

4. If the professor is not on contract or 
in residence on the campus, he or she 
shall have the right to defer the proce- 
dure until his or her return. Similarly, 
if the procedure would normally occur 
during the summer and the student is 
not enroOed in anv summer session, 
the procedure may be deferred until 



the fall semester at the student's 
request. 

Academic Dishonesty Policy 

I. Academic Dishonesty Process 

A. Academic dishonesty is prohibited 
and violations may result in disci- 
pline up to and including expulsion 
from the University. Academic dis- 
honesty as it apphes to students 
includes but is not limited to aca- 
demic cheating; plagiarism; the 
sale, purchase, or exchange of term 
papers or research papers; falsifica- 
tion of information, which includes 
any form of providing false or mis- 
leading information, written, elec- 
tronic, or oral; or of altering or fal- 
sifying official institutional records. 
Plagiarism is defined as copying 
another's work or portions thereof 
and/or using ideas and concepts of 
another and presenting them as 
one's own without giving proper 
credit to the source. 

NOTE: The Student Code of 
Conduct covers theft or attempted 
theft of property or services; 
destruction; vandalism; misuse or 
abuse of the real or personal prop- 
erty of the University, any organi- 
zation, or any individual. 

B. Charges of academic dishonesty 
against a student may be brought 
by any member of the University 
community. Students making 
claims of dishonesty must do so 
under the guidance of the appro- 
priate involved facult)' member or 
office director A written charge 
must be initiated within 20 calen- 
dar days from the date of the 
alleged action. However, if the 
alleged action occurs during the 
last 20 calendar days of the semes- 
ter, the charger has 20 calendar 
days into the subsequent semester 
to make the charge. The last day of 
the semester is the last day of final 
examinations. 

NOTE: If the charger is not on 
contract or in residence on the 
campus, he or she shall have the 
right to defer the procedure until 
his or her return. Similarly, if the 
procedure would normally occur 
during the summer and the charger 
is not enrolled in any summer ses- 
sion, the procedure may be 
deferred at the charger's request. 

C. Charges of academic dishonesty 
may be dealt with inlbrmaily, by 



Academic Information and Regulations 



mutual ;igrccmctit ot the person 
bringing the charges and the stu- 
dent. A written agreement of the 
settlement shall be signed by both 
sides. An instructor may, on his/her 
own authority, apply a penalty to 
the student's grade, including fail- 
ure in the course. If additional 
sanctions are requested by the 
instructor, the appeals process must 
be employed and an academic 
integrity hearing must be con- 
vened. A student may appeal the 
instructor's unilateral imposition of 
a penalized or failing grade. A stu- 
dent who files an appeal will suffer 
no worse penalty as a result of the 
appeal than he/she would have suf- 
fered if he/she had not appealed 
the instructor's unilateral action. 

D. If the informiil process has not 
been employed or either party is 
not satisfied with the resolution 
under (C) above, then that party 
shall, within 10 calendar days, sub- 
mit written notification to the 
department chair or unit director. 
The department shall then, within 
20 calendar days, handle the matter 
according to its own written proce- 
dures and provide written notifica- 
tion of its decision to all parties. 

E. If either party is not satisfied with 
the resolution reached in (D) above, 
that party may, within 20 calendar 
days of the department's decision, 
appeal the matter in writing to the 
dean or, in the absense of the dean, 
another appropriate administrator. 
The dean or adminstrator shall 
then, within 20 calendar days, han- 
dle the matter according to his/her 
written procedures and provide 
WTitten notification to all parties. 

F. If either party is not satisfied with the 
decision of the dean or administrator, 
that party may, within 10 calendar 
days, appeal the matter in writing to 
the Academic Integrity Board. 

II. Membership of the Academic 

Integrity Board 

A. The provost (or provost's designee) 
shall appoint faculty and adminis- 
tration members of the Academic 
Integrity Board. The associate 
provost (or, if appropriate, the dean 
of graduate studies and extended 
education) serves as nonvoting 
chairperson. If the associate provost 
or dean of graduate studies is not 
available to serve, the administra- 
tion will appoint a substitute. 



B. A faculty dean not involveil in the 
charging process. A substitute may 
be appointed as given in (A) above. 

C. Two faculty members. At the begin- 
ning of each academic year, the 
Office of the Associate Provost shall 
randomly select two fiiU-time facul- 
ty from each academic department 
in order to constitute the pool. Two 
faculty members from different 
departments will be randomly 
selected from this pool to serve on 
the Academic Integrity Board. 

D. Two undergraduate students or, if 
appropriate, two graduate students, 
appointed by the president of the 
Student Government Association 
(SGA) or president of the 
Graduate Student Association 
(GSA), respectively. 

HI. Hearing Procedures for Academic 
Integrity Board 

The chair wiU provide notice to all 
parties. 

A. Hearings shall proceed to the 
extent possible according to the 
following form: 

1. The chair shall open the pro- 
ceedings by reading the state- 
ment of charges; 

2. The charging party shall then 
present the case against the 
accused party. This shall be 
done by the submission of writ- 
ten, physical, and testimonial 
evidence. The accused party and 
the board shall have the right to 
conduct reasonable questioning 
of the charging party and the 
charging party's witnesses; 

3. At the conclusion of the charging 
party's presentation, the accused 
party may present a defense or 
may plead to the charges. This 
shall be done by the submission 
of written, physical, and testimo- 
nial evidence. The charging party 
shall have the right to conduct 
reasonable questioning of the 
accused party and the accused 
party's witnesses; 

4. After both cases have been pre- 
sented, the board shall allow 
rebuttal evidence; 

5. At the close of the hearing, the 
board shall aUow closing argu- 
ments by the parties. 

B. The board chair shall have authori- 
ty and be responsible for maintain- 
ing an orderly procedure through- 
out the hearing. 

C. Ail hearings are closed proceed- 



ings; witnesses may be excluded 
from the room until the appropri- 
ate time for their testimony. 

D. The burden of proof rests on the 
individual bringing charges. 

E. All matters upon which the deci- 
sion will be based must be intro- 
duced into evidence at the hearing. 

F. Both parties shall have the right to 
be assisted by advisers, who may be 
attorneys, and who may be present 
at hearings. The board chair must 
be notified in advance of the hear- 
ing who the advisers will be. The 
advisers may only consult and inter- 
act privately with their advisees, 
and may not address the board. 

G. All hearings will be tape recorded. 
The audiotape record of the hear- 
ing will be archived in the Office 
of the Provost or the Office of the 
Dean of Graduate Studies and 
Extended Education, or his/her 
designee for five years. A written 
transcript of the hearing will be 
provided at the expense of the 
University pursuant to a validly 
issued subpoena. 

H. A written recommendation based 
on a preponderance of evidence, 
arrived at by majority vote, in which 
the facts and reasons for the recom- 
mendation are set forth shall be 
issued within 15 calendar days after 
the close of the board proceedings 
and shall be sent to the provost and 
vice president for academic affairs 
with copies to all parties. Within 15 
calendar days the provost shall 
implement the recommendation of 
the board or shall provide a written 
response containing his/her decision 
and explaining to all parties his/her 
reasons for declining to implement 
the board's recommendation. 

I. Any party who fails without appro- 
priate reason to appear at the hear- 
ing consents to the conduction of 
the hearing in his or her absence. 

J. The board retains the right to con- 
tinue a hearing whenever necessary 
and appropriate. 

K. Either party may express its reac- 
tion in writing regarding the rec- 
ommendation of the board to the 
provost or his/her designee within 
seven calendar days. Any stay of 
sanction shall be granted only upon 
application to and at the sole dis- 
cretion of the provost or his/her 
designee. The decision of the 
provost shall be final. 



Academic Information and Regulations 



NOTE: A written statement ot the 
decision and relevant materials 
shall be placed in the student's aca- 
demic file and sent to the student's 
academic adviser. In the absence of 
a student appciil, the recommended 
sanctions from the department and 
dean's level should be forwarded 
from the dean's office to the 
provost for action. 
I\'. Sanctions 

A. At the conclusion of the appeals 
process, a student may be exonerated 
or subject to any combination of the 
following range of penalties. If a stu- 
dent has a record of past violations 
of the Student Academic Dishon- 
esty Polic)' as adjudicated by the 
Academic Integrity Board, then the 
board will review that record and 
consider it when applying sanctions. 
The board shall have no knowledge 
of that record when making its ini- 
tial adjudication of the case. 

1. The board with the approval of 
the instructor may apply a 
penalty to the student's grade, 
including failure in the course. 

2. Disciplinary probation: The stu- 
dent is informed in writing that 
he or she is being placed on dis- 
ciplinary probation for a specific 
period of time. This action is a 
period of official censure. A pro- 
bation action may specify any 
conditions with which the indi- 
vidual must comply or any privi- 
leges which may be withheld. 
Probation may include the loss of 
privilege to represent the 
University in official capacity 
including but not limited to var- 
sity and nonvarsit}' intercollegiate 
events, plays, and holding office 
in campus government or related 
organizations. If at any time dur- 
ing his or her probationarv' peri- 
od the student violates University 
regulations, he or she may be 
subject to further disciplinary 
action from the University. 

3. Suspension: The student is 
informed in writing that he or 
she is being involuntarily sus- 
pended from the University for a 
designated period of time. The 

« dean ot students must be noti- 

fied of the suspension. A student 
shall lose student status and may 
not attend classes, take exams, 
receive grades, or be on Univ- 
ersity property except for 



authorized University' business 
during the suspension period. 
Authorized University business 
must be approved in advance by 
the provost and wcc president 
for academic affairs or designee. 
After the designated period of 
time, the student must seek 
approval from the provost and 
vice president for academic 
affairs or designee to reapply to 
return through the Office of 
Admissions. The board may 
establish additional requirements 
which must be fulfilled to the 
satisfaction of the provost and 
vice president for academic 
affairs or designee prior to rein- 
statement. There will be no 
refunding of fees. The assign- 
ment of grades shall be in accor- 
dance with University policy. 

4. Expulsion: The student is 
informed in writing that he or 
she is being expelled from the 
University. This action is one of 
involuntary separation from the 
University. The relationship 
between the student and this 
University is permanently ter- 
minated. The student is not 
permitted on University proper- 
ty. There will be no refunding of 
fees. The assignment of grades 
shall be in accordance with 
University policy. The fact of 
the expulsion and the reason for 
it will be entered upon the stu- 
dent's official transcript and 
upon all copies thereof A stu- 
dent who has been expelled for 
academic dishonesty will not be 
awarded a degree from West 
Chester University. 

5. Restitution: Restitution may be 
imposed on students whose vio- 
lation of these standards has 
involved monetary loss or dam- 
age. Restitution as imposed by 
the board will be regarded by 
the University as a financial 
obhgation to the University. 

6. Hold on records: The University 
.may withhold transcripts, 

grades, degrees, diplomas, or 
other official records pending 
the disposition of cases. 

Notes 

1. If the charger is not on contract or in 
residence on the campus, he or she 
shall have the right to defer the proce- 



dure until his or her return. Similarly, if 
the procedure would normally occur 
during the summer and the charger is 
not enrolled in any summer session, the 
procedure may be deferred until the fall 
semester at the charger's request. 

2. Each department must submit to the 
academic dean its written process for 
hearing appeals. Likewise, each aca- 
demic dean must submit to the provost 
and vice president for academic affairs 
his or her written process for hearing 
appeals. These processes must, as a 
minimum, provide notice to all 
involved parties and must provide an 
opportunity for all parties to be heard 
by a neutral fact finder or body who 
will render a decision. 

3. A written statement of the decision 
and relevant materials shall be placed 
in the student's academic file and sent 
to the student's academic adviser. In 
the absense of a student appeal, the 
recommended sanctions from the 
department and dean's level should be 
forwarded from the dean's office to 
the provost for action. 

Obtaining Transcripts 

Transcripts of work taken at West 
Chester Universit)' may be obtained fi-om 
the Office of the Registrar. A check or 
money order, payable to West Chester 
University, must accompany a written 
request that should include the period of 
attendance at the University', degree status, 
the curriculum pursued. Social Security 
number, and any change of name during 
enrollment. For a description of the tran- 
script fee, see "Fees and Expenses." 

Changes in Name or Address 

Students should immediately notify the 
Office ot Graduate Studies and 
Extended Education, and their depart- 
ment of any change of address or 
change in name. 

The Comprehensive (Area of 
Specialization) Examination 

A comprehensive examination covers 
the student's major field and is con- 
structed, administered, and evaluated by 
the faculty of the student's major 
department or program. Candidates are 
responsible to know the deadlines and 
conditions for the examination and must 
apply to the program graduate coordina- 
tor or chair. Generally, students are not 
eligible to take the examination prior to 
the semester in which all courses in the 
major discipline are completed. 



Aiadcmic Intormatioii aiul Rctfulations 



Defense of Master's Thesis 

Students who write a master's thesis 
must first have the "Request for Ap- 
proval of Master's Thesis Examining 
Committee" torm completed and signed 
before the student begins work on the 
thesis. (This form is available at the 
Office of Graduate Studies and Ex- 
tended Education, McKelvie Hall.) The 
completed thesis must be successfiilly 
defended before a faculty examining 
committee. The requirement of the 
Universit)' is that a student passing the 
thesis defense will receive no more than 
one negative vote from the examining 
committee. However, in a number of 
departments, a unanimous positive vote 
of the examining committee is required 
for a successful defense. Thesis students 
should check departmental requirements 
with the graduate coordinator. 

Other Elxaminations 

Other examinations may be required of 
degree students. All requirements given 
under the heading of the particular pro- 
gram should be carefially noted. 

Research Requirements 

Students should consult specific pro- 
grams to determine whether independ- 
ent study directed toward either the the- 
sis or a research report is required, 
offered optionally, or omitted. 

Application for Graduation 

Each candidate for a master's degree 
must submit the following items to the 
Office of Graduate Studies and 
Extended Education: (1) a form indicat- 
ing intent to graduate, with a copy to 
the chairperson of the candidate's 
department; (2) a check for $56 made 
payable to the Commencement Fund; 
(3) a Commencement Fund invoice 
form; and (4) a cap and gown order 
form. lAll of these forms are available in 
a packet from the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education. The 
following ;ire deadline dates for applying 
to graduate: May graduation — February 
1; August graduation — June 1; 
December graduation — October 1. 

Submitting the Thesis for 
Binding 

After approval by the examining com- 
mittee, theses must be typed in accor- 
dance with specifications contained in 
the "Guide to the Preparation of the 
Master's Thesis," a copy of which may 
be obtained from departmental offices 



or the Office of Graduate Studies and 
Extended Education. After the dean of 
graduate studies and extended education 
has approved the thesis, the student is 
responsible for transmitting all required 
copies to the library for binding. 

Second Master's Degree 

Students wishing to obtain a second 
master's degree from West Chester 
University must meet all academic 
requirements set by the Office of 
Graduate Studies and the department 
concerned. Candidates for a second mas- 
ter's degree must earn a minimum of 24 
credits beyond the hours applied toward 
the first master's degree. All new credits 
and additional departmental academic 
requirements must have been completed 
within a six-year period preceding the 
awarding of the second degree. 

Formal Admission to Teacher 
Education for Certification 

As part of the admission process, graduate 
students (both in post-baccalaureate and 
master's programs) seeking professional 
certification must complete and submit to 
the Office of Teacher Certificate an 
"Intent to Seek Teacher Certification" 
form along with a completed and signed 
(by department adviser) "Approved 
Program of Study" form. Effective fall 
2003, applicants seeking Pennsylvania 
Level I (initial) certification must have a 
minimum 3.0 cumulative GPA (some 
programs have higher GPA requirements) 
and meet all other program admission 
requirements. Applicants seeking admis- 
sion to advanced preparation programs 
(reading and counseling) must have a 
minimum 3.0 cumulati\'e GPA and meet 
all other program admission requirements. 
All graduate students must maintain a 3.0 
GPA in their graduate studies to maintain 
good standing at WCU. 
In addition to achieving a 3.0 GPA in 
their course work, graduate students pur- 
suing programs leading to Pennsylvania 
Level I certification must pass the Pre- 
Professional Skills Test (PPST), be for- 
mally admitted into teacher education 
during their first semester, and maintain a 
3.0 GPA in order to continue taking 
course work specified in their approved 
program of study. Students whose pro- 
grams culminate in a student teaching 
semester must apply to student teach dur- 
ing the first month of classes (September 
or January) of the semester prior to the 
intended student teaching semester. 
Students in the elementary education 



program are required to apply for student 
teaching two semesters prior to the 
intended student teaching semester. 
Graduate students seeking Pennsylvania 
certification must pass all the relevant 
professional assessments, including spe- 
cialty area exams, required by the Penn- 
sylvania Department of Education. 
Students should confer with their advis- 
er and with the Office of Certification 
in the School of Education for specific 
test information. It is the graduate stu- 
dent's responsibility to apply for a 
Pennsylvania certificate through the 
University's Certification Office. 

The Pennsylvania Teacher 
Intern Certification Program 

Designed for individuals who possess a 
baccalaureate degree, the intern certificate 
is valid for a period of three years. The 
certificate is issued only for instructional 
areas; it is not applicable for professionals 
seeking certification as educational spe- 
cialists, administrators, or supervisors. ' 
Before being admitted to the program, 
candidates for the teacher intern certifi- 
cate are expected to attain all of the pro- 
fessional competencies established for stu- 
dents pursuing a degree program with 
certification in a specific field, with the 
exception of student teaching. Candidates 
are expected to obtain a firm offer for a 
teaching position that will be held during 
the internship period. Contact the 
Teacher Education Center in Room 251, 
Francis Harvey Green Librarj'. 

Graduates Seeking Initial 
Teaching Certification 

College graduates who wash to obtain 
initial teaching certification (Instructional 
I) should contact the Teacher Education 
Center in Room 251 of the Francis 
Harvey Green Librarv'. 

Permanent Teaching 
Certification 

The Instructional II (Permanent) 
Certificate is a permanent certificate 
issued to an appUcant who has complet- 
ed three years of satisfactory teaching on 
an Instructional I Certificate, attested to 
by the superintendent of the school dis- 
trict in which his or her most recent 
service was performed, or, in the case of 
an intermediate unit, the executive 
director, or in the case of an approved 
nonpublic school, the chief school 
administrator. In addition, the applicant 
must complete 24 semester hours of col- 
legiate study at an approved four-year 



AcadLTnic Intormation and Regulations 



institution after receiving a baccalaure- 
ate degree. 

IN-SERVICE PROGRAMS— The 24- 
semester-hour requirement may be satis- 
fied, in whole or in part, through in-serv- 
ice programs approved by the Secretary 
of Education of the Commonwealth. 

Educational Specialist 
Certification 

Commonwealth regulations also provide 
for certification as an educational special- 
ist to those persons who successfully com- 
plete an approved program of study and 
have the recommendation of the training 
institution. The Educational Specialist 
Certificate is issued on two levels. 

Educational Specialist I (Provisional) 

The Educational Specialist I Certificate 
is issued for entry into a professional 
position in the schools of the Common- 
wealth. The applicant must have com- 
pleted an approved program of study, 
pbssess a baccalaureate degree, and been 
recommended for certification by the 
preparing institution. 

Educational Specialist II (Permanent) 

The Educational Specialist II 
Certificate is a permanent certificate 
issued to an applicant who has complet- 
ed three years of satisfactory service on 
an Educational Specialist I Certificate, 
and who has completed 24 semester 
hours of postbaccalaureate or graduate 
study at a regionally approved institu- 
tion. In addition, the applicant must 
have received the recommendation of 
the superintendent of the school district 
in which his or her most recent service 
was performed, or in the case of an 
intermediate unit, the executive director, 
or in the case of an approved nonpublic 
school, the chief school administrator. 
On June 1, 1987, the Pennsylvania State 
Board of Education implemented revi- 
sions to the Pennsylvania Code. These 
revisions require all students who apply for 
Pennsylvania teaching certificates to pass 
state competency tests in basic skills, gen- 
eral knowledge, professional knowledge, 
and specific knowledge of the subjects in 
which they seek teacher certification. 
As changes arc made in requirements 
for all certification programs, it is the 
student's responsibility to satisfy the 
new requirements. 

Professional Certificates 

Several departments and programs, in 
addition to offering degrees, offer pro- 



fessional certificates on completion ot a 
prescribed course of study. Consult the 
individual department or program hst- 
ings regarding offerings. 

The Frederick Douglass Institute 

The Frederick Douglass Institute at West 
Chester University is an academic pro- 
gram for advancing multicultural studies 
across the curriculum and tor deepening 
the intellectual heritage ot Frederick 
Douglass, the former slave, distinguished 
orator, journalist, author, and statesman. 
Douglass, who was a frequent visitor to 
the West Chester area, gave his last pub- 
lic lecture on West Chester's campus on 
February 1, 1895. Thirty years earlier, at 
the inauguration of a Baltimore, 
Maryland, institute named for him in 
October 1865, Douglass said that the 
mission was "to be a dispenser of knowl- 
edge, a radiator of light. In a word, we 
dedicate this institution to virtue, tem- 
perence, truth, liberty, and justice." 
At West Chester University, the 
Douglass Institute is primarily involved 
in four academic areas: 1) conducting 
research in multiculturalism and on 
Frederick Douglass; 2) sponsoring dis- 
tinguished exhibits and lectures; 3) 
establishing opportunities for advanced 
study for public, private, and college- 
level teachers; 4) and, collaborating with 
historical societies and other educational 
and cultural agencies. 
The activities of the institute take place 
on and off campus. With undergraduate 
and graduate students, and West 
Chester faculty, the institute sponsors 
seminars and forums on selected topics. 
The Anna Murray Douglass Circle is 
the name for a lecture series offering a 
platform for today's leading intellectuals. 
Annually in October, the institute spon- 
sors Douglass Days, a festival of educa- 
tional activities on Douglass and multi- 
culturalism that involves the entire cam- 
pus and surrounding communities. West 
Chester's institute is the convener for 
the Frederick Douglass Institute of the 
Pennsylvania State System of Higher 
Education, a collaborative created in 
1999 with other campuses. 
For further information, call Dr. C. 
James Trotman, director, Frederick 
Douglass Institute at 610-436-2766. 

Directory Information 

The Family Education;il Rights and 
Privacy Act defines the term "directory 
information" to include the following cat- 
egories of information: the student's 



name, addresses, teleplione numbers, date 
and place of birth, major field ot study, 
participation in officially recognized 
activities and sports, weight and height of 
members of athletic teams, dates of 
attendance, degrees and awards received, 
and the most recent educational agency 
or institution attended by the student. 
The Universit}' will limit information 
that is made public to categories such as 
these but will not necessarily publish all 
such information in every listing. 
Students who do not wish to have any 
or all of such "directory information" 
pubUshed without their prior consent 
must fde notice — undergraduates in the 
Office of the Registrar, and graduate 
students in the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education and in 
the Office of the Registrar. A signed, 
dated statement specifying items not to 
be published must be brought by the 
student to the appropriate office within 
the first 15 calendar days after the 
beginning of the fall semester. 

ADA Policy Statement 

West Chester University is committed 
to equality of opportunity and freedom 
from discrimination for all students, 
employees, applicants for admission or 
employment, and all participants in 
public University-sponsored activities. 
In keeping with this commitment, and 
in accordance with the Americans with 
Disabilities Act of 1990 and the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the 
Universitv will make every effort to pro- 
vide equality of opportunity and free- 
dom from discrimination tor all mem- 
bers of the University community and 
visitors to the University, regardless of 
any disability an individual may have. 
Accordingly, the University has taken 
positive steps to make University facili- 
ties accessible to individuals with dis- 
abilities and has established procedures 
to provide reasonable accommodations 
to allow individuals with disabilities to 
participate in University programs. 
The director of the Office of Social 
Equity has been designated as the ADA 
coordinator for the University. In this 
capacity, the director ot social equity 
works with the University ADA 
Committee to advance University poli- 
cies and procedures that will provide 
equal educational and employment 
opportunities for individuals with dis- 
abilities. The Office of Social Equity has 
an established process to investigate and 
address any complaints of discrimina- 



University Services and Student Living 



tion 1)11 the basis ot a disability. Any 
individual who has a suggestion, ques- 
tion, or complaint regarding ADA issues 
is encouraged to contact the director of 
social equity, 1.V15 University Avenue, 
610-436-2433. 

West Chester University has also estab- 
lished the Office of Services for 
Students with Disabilities, which oper- 
ates as a centralized service for address- 
ing the needs of students with disabili- 
ties and as a resource center for stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff A student who 
wants to request an accommodation 
and/or receive specialized services 
should contact the director of the 



OSSD. 1 he policies and procedures 
used by the OSSD are contained in the 
West Chester University Handbook on 
Disabilities, which is available in the 
OSSD, 105 Lawrence Center, V/TDD 
610-436-3217. 

Various housing facilities and services 
are available for resident students with 
disabilities. For this and other informa- 
tion about on-campus housing and food 
service, please contact the Office of 
Residence Life and Housing, 238 Sykes 
Student Union, 610-436-3307. 
The Office of Human Resource Services 
has been designated as the contact for 
employees and applicants seeking to 



request an accommodation. The Office 
ot Human Resource Services is located at 
201 Carter Drive, 610-436-2800. 
West Chester University is involved in 
the ongoing process of renovating cam- 
pus buildings to ensure accessibility for 
all individuals. Many of our buildings 
are currently accessible, but some are 
awaiting renovation. To find out 
whether a particular location is accessi- 
ble or how to access a location, please 
contact the space manager at 610-436- 
3348. To make arrangements for 
changes to a particular facility to ensure 
accessibility, please contact the manager 
of campus projects at 610-436-3599. 



University Services and Student Living 



Francis Harvey Green Library 

The Francis Harvey Green Library 
offers an excellent environment for 
study and research.The general collec- 
tion includes more than 616,000 print 
volumes, 2,200 print periodiciil sub- 
scriptions, and 72,000 audio visual items 
(including videos, DVDs, and sound 
recordings). In addition, the library 
licenses more than 5,700 electronic 
books and the full text of articles from 
more than 14,000 periodicals on the 
Web. The majority of Web materials 
may be accessed off campus by entering 
the 14- or 16-digit number from a cur- 
rent WCU ID. These materials are aug- 
mented by an extensive collection of 
maps, government documents, and more 
than 875,000 items in microform, 
including books, periodicals, newspa- 
pers, and doctoral dissertations. The 
total library collection compares favor- 
ably with other major public and private 
libraries in the West Chester area. 
Special holdings include the Chester 
County Collection of Scientific and 
Historical Books, the Normal 
Collection (publications by faculty and 
alumni), and the Stanley Weintraub 
Center for the Study of Arts and 
Humanities. Important rare books 
include the Biographies of the Signers of 
the Declaration of Independence bv John 
Sanderson and the first four folios of 
Shakespeare, ^-yso worthy of note are 
the collections of children's literature, 



instructional media, and music, as well 
as the Philips collection of autographed 
books.The library's Web site provides 
continually updated access to a wide 
array of resources and services, including 
the library's catalog and links to more 
than 100 citation databases. There is a 
coffee cafe as weO as a separate study 
lounge tor graduate students. Library 
services include reference (in-person, 
telephone, and e-mail), electronic 
reserves, interlibrary loan, wireless lap- 
tops for use in the library, and access to 
coin-operated photocopiers and micro- 
form copiers. 

Housing 

West Chester provides housing facilities 
for its graduate students on a limited basis 
for the regular school year and all summer 
sessions. Graduate students may live in 
either a North Campus residence hall 
(that houses predominandy undergradu- 
ate students), with a 24-hour quiet hour 
option, or in selected units of the South 
Campus apartment complex. Students in 
the residence halls must be on the 
University meal plan; apartment residents 
have the option of any meal plan offered 
or no plan at all. North Campus residence 
hall rooms are all double occupancy, 
apartments are designed for five occu- 
pants in combinations of double and sin- 
gle bedrooms. Graduate students are 
expected to abide by all regulations 
appropriate to their li\ing arrangements. 
Upon acceptance to graduate study, stu- 



dents may contact the Office of 
Residence Life and Housing Services for 
additional information and applications 
for on-campus housing. Students are 
encouraged to contact this office as early 
as possible since the availability of on- 
campus housing varies based on the time 
of year that the request is made. 
For assistance in locating a dwelling or 
apartment off campus, students may 
contact the Off-Campus and Commuter 
Services program. 
The Office of Residence Life and 
Housing Services is located in 238 
Sykes Student Union, 610-436-3307. 

OfF-Campus and Commuter 
Services 

Services to off-campus and commuter 
students include off-campus housing 
listings and the Off-Campus and 
Commuter Association, which provides 
special programming and resource mate- 
rials. Additional services offered include 
landlord/tenant legal aid information 
and development of long-range plans to 
meet the needs of off-campus and com- 
muter students. 

Off-Campus and Commuter Services, 
coordinated by the associate director of 
Svkes Union, are located in 116 Sykes 
Student Union, 610-436-2984. 

OflF- Campus Housing 

Students who choose to live in the com- 
munity must secure their own living 



University Services and Student Living 



accommodations. The OtV-Campus and 
Commuter Ser%'ices program will assist 
students in finding housing by providing 
up-to-date listings of available housing. 
These listings are available in 116 Sykes 
Student Union and may be accessed on 
the Web at vvww.wcupa.edu/_services/ 
Stu.occ/och2k. 

Student Health and Wellness 
Centers 

The University maintains a Student 
Health Center staffed by physicians, 
nurse practitioners, registered nurses, 
health educators, and a nutritionist. The 
Health Center staff is available to meet 
emergencv and first-aid needs, and to 
perform routine treatment of minor ill- 
nesses and minor surgical conditions. 
The Student Health and Wellness 
Centers also offer programs designed to 
enhance wellness, disease prevention, 
and health education. 
Part-time graduate students must pay the 
student health fee to be eligible for ser\'- 
ices. The University does not furnish 
other medical care or bear the costs of 
medical or surgical treatment or hospital- 
ization. The community of West Chester 
has qualified physicians and excellent 
facilities at the Chester County Hospital. 
The Student Health and Wellness 
Centers are located on the second floor 
of Wayne Hall. Any emergencies during 
the night and on weekends may be 
treated at the Chester County Hospital 
Emergency Room. The Health Center 
phone number is 610-436-2509 and vis- 
its are available by appointment. The 
Wellness Center phone number is 610- 
436-3276. 

Graduate students, their spouses, and 
dependents may take advantage of a group 
medical illness and accident insurance pol- 
icy approved by the University. Under the 
same group plan, there is a separate sum- 
mer policy. Visit the Student Health and 
Wellness Centers for additional informa- 
tion and brochures. 

Services for Students with 
Disabilities 

The Office of Services for Students with 
Disabilities (OSSD) offers services for 
students with physical and learning dis- 
abilities. The OSSD is designed to assist 
students to make a successfiil transition 
to the University. We take a proactive 
stance that encourages students to 
understand their needs and strengths in 
order to best advocate for themselves. 



The OSSD is located within the 
Academic Programs and Services 
Division and coordinates services with 
the other units within the division, such 
as the Learning Assistance and Resource 
Center and the Academic Advising 
Center, as well as other University offices 
including the Writing Center and the 
Office of Residence Life and Housing. 
Liaison with governmental agencies and 
private practitioners for provision of serv- 
ices is also available through the OSSD. 
In order to ensure continuity of services, 
students should pursue such actions prior 
to enrollment. Students needing financial 
support for personal ser\'ices or inter- 
preters should register with the appropri- 
ate agency at least six months in advance 
of matriculation. 
Office of Services for Students with 

Disabilities 
105 Lawrence Center 
West Chester University 
West Chester, PA 19383 
610-436-2564 

Services Provided for Students 
with Disabilities 

• Central Documentation File 

• Optional Comprehensive Needs 
Assessment 

• Advocacy with Faculty 

• Alternative Test-Taking 
Arrangements 

• Note-Taking Support 

• Study Skills Tutoring 

• Taped Texts Assistance (Recordings 
for the Blind, Inc.) 

• Adaptive Technology 

• Readers for Visually Impaired Students 

• Interpreters for Deaf Students 

• Course Substitutes (e.g., Foreign 
Language) 

• Peer Support 

• Association for Disability Awareness 

Information Services 

Information Services provides comput- 
ing resources for a wide variety of users, 
both academic and administrative. 
Many of the University's administrative 
functions, such as registration, grade 
reporting, and billing, depend heavily on 
the campus-wide transaction processing 
system, which provides centralized 
access to University data from worksta- 
tions located throughout the campus. 
More importantly, computing is a \atal 
instructional and research tool. Infor- 
mation Services offers students and fac- 



ulty a wide range of computing 
resources, including a variety of software 
packages and hardware resources such as 
SAS, SPSS, MINITAB, programming 
languages, office software products, 
microcomputers, printers, graphics 
workstations, digitizers, and optical 
scanners. Many of these facilities are 
available at various campus locations, 
but the Academic Computing Center 
on the ground floor of Anderson Hall 
serves as a focal point of instructional 
computing activity. A valid WCU ID 
card is required to use the Academic 
Computing Center. (For further infor- 
mation, contact the Academic Com- 
puting Center at 610-436-3349.) 
Computing facilities throughout the 
campus are joined by a high-speed net- 
work. 

WCU faculty, staff, and students also 
can access computing resources off- 
campus through the Web. The network 
provides electronic mail capabilities for 
all campus workstations, connection to 
the Internet, and access to the 
University's main librar}' catalogs. 
The WCU network provides high-speed 
access to software applications (includ- 
ing programming languages, spread- 
sheets, word processors, and faculty- 
developed programs) and electronic 
communications capabilities to worksta- 
tions. Student laboratory facilities are 
available in the Academic Computing 
Center, each of the nine residence halls, 
and Sykes Student Union. 
Information Services is located in 
Anderson Hall, 610-436-2828. 

Bookstore 

The Student Services Inc. Bookstore is 
located on the ground floor of Sykes 
Student Union. The bookstore sells both 
new and used textbooks for all WCU 
courses, as well as school and art sup- 
plies. The store also stocks best sellers, a 
variety of general interest literature, and 
a large selection of reference books, 
study aids, and teacher aids. SSI 
Bookstore offers a complete line of offi- 
cial WCU imprinted clothing and an 
extensive array of gifts, greeting cards, 
groceries, snacks, and laundry supplies. 
Services include film processing, special 
orders for computer software and gener- 
al interest books, UPS shipping, and 
daily book buybacks. All major credit 
cards and personal checks, accompanied 
with a valid ID, are accepted. 



I Inivcrsirv Services and Student Living 



liookstore hours: 

Mon.-Tliurs. 8 a.m.-6 p.m. 

Friday 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Saturday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 

(Hours may be subject to change.) 
The bookstore offers extended hours of 
operation at the beginning of each 
semester. As a shopping convenience, 
students may order textbooks and mer- 
chandise via the bookstore Web site, 
\vww.click2ssi-bookstore.com. 

Career Development Center 

The Universirj' provides career planning 
and placement services and programs for 
its students and graduates through the 
Twardowski Career Development Center. 
The Twardowski Career Development 
Center's librar)' provides information 
about careers, federal and state govern- 
ment positions, application forms, pro- 
cedures, and job requirements. 
The center also maintains listings of job 
vacancies in business, education, and 
industry. 

The services available to graduate stu- 
dents are career counseling; resume 
referral; and an on-campus interview 
program. The center's Web site contains 
links to a variety of job vacancy databas- 
es as well as sites to post resumes on the 
Internet. A variety of resume services are 
also provided, from samples to assistance 
in developing a resume to free critiques. 
The Twardowski Career Development 
Center is located in 106 Lawrence 
Center, 610-436-2501. For additional 
career information visit the Web page at 
www.wcupa.edu/_services/stu.car/. 

Multicultural Affairs 

The Office of Multicultural Affairs is 
dedicated to the development of multicul- 
tural sensitivit)', understanding, and appre- 
ciation of diversity among students. The 
office develops and implements compre- 
hensive programs aimed at addressing the 
needs and concerns of the multicultural 
student. The Office of Multicultural 
Aflfairs also serves as a resource for other 
University offices regarding multicultural 
students and aids in projects focused on 
improving the general campus climate. 
The office is located in 238 Sykes Student 
Union, 610-436-3273. 

Public Safety 

West Chester Universirv is concerned 
about the safety and welfare ot all cam- 
pus members and is committed to pro- 
viding a safe and secure environment. 



Campus security is the responsibility ot 
the University's Department of Public 
Safety, located in the Peoples Building 
at the corner of Church Street and 
University Avenue. 
Because no campus is isolated from 
crime, the University has developed a 
series of policies and procedures to 
ensure that every possible precautionary 
measure is taken to protect members of 
the University community while they 
are on campus. 

A fiiU explanation of the University's 
security policies and procedures, as well 
as additional pertinent information, 
appears in a publication called "Your 
Safety Is Our Concern," which is avail- 
able from the Office of Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education, and 
from the Department of Public Safety 
or on the Web at www.wcupa.edu/ 
_information/afa/RTK.htm. 

Vehicle Registration 

All employees, eligible students, and visi- 
tors planning to use West Chester 
University parking lots must register their 
vehicles v/ith the Department of Public 
Safety and purchase/obtain a parking 
permit/pass. Graduate students are 
required to purchase the appropriate 
parking permit depending on whether 
they are commuter or resident students. 
Student parking lots do not require a 
permit from 4 p.m. through 11 p.m. 
weekdays and on weekends from 4 p.m. 
Friday to midnight Sunday throughout 
the year. Commuter students who have 
classes during that time do not need to 
purchase a parking permit. 
The annual registration fee is established 
by the Council of Trustees. For parking 
regulations, "annual" is defined as 
September 1 until August 31 of the fol- 
lowing vear. Specific registration proce- 
dures will be announced yearly. A valid 
WCU ID/driver's license and vehicle 
registration must be presented at the 
time of registration. The parking permit 
is to be displayed properly from the rear 
view mirror as stated on the reverse side 
of the permit. MutUated, defaced, lost, or 
stolen permits must be replaced. Contact 
tlie Public Safet)' Parking Services Office 
for the procedure and cost of replacing 
the permit. The operation and registra- 
tion of a vehicle must conform to 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania vehicle 
law and University' regulations. For com- 
plete information regarding motor vehi- 
cles and registration, refer to the Motor 
Vehicle Regulations pamphlet available at 



Public Safety or on the Web at 

wwav.wcupa.edu/_information/afa/Public 

Safety/MVRegs/MVReg.htm. 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

The Speech and Hearing Clinic, located 
at 201 Carter Drive, is operated by the 
Department of Communicative 
Disorders as a teaching-training facility 
for its undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents. The clinic provides diagnostic 
and therapeutic services for persons with 
speech, language, and hearing problems. 
These services are provided free of 
charge to West Chester University stu- 
dents, faculty, and staff, and to students 
enrolled at Cheyney University. A fee is 
charged to others who wish to use the 
services of the clinic. 

Sykes Union Building 

The Earl F. Sykes Union first opened in 
1975 as the community center for West 
Chester University. In 1995 the Sykes 
Union facility was reopened after under- 
going a complete renovation and expan- 
sion to its present 102,000 square feet. 
The student union, as a facility and an 
operation, is designed to encourage all 
members of the campus community to 
participate in a wide variet}' of cultural, 
social, educational, and recreational pro- 
grams. The renovated multipurpose 
building features expanded facilities as 
well as new and improved services. 
Building highlights include a 350-seat 
theater, fitness center, and bookstore, all 
on the ground floor The first floor 
offisrs a dining area with seating for 350, 
an outdoor terrace, and a large food 
servery. Also included on the first floor 
is a 5,000-square foot multipurpose 
room designed for dances, concerts, 
banquets, and lectures, as well as the 
student union administrative offices, 
Information Center, and Off-Campus 
and Commuter Services. 
The second floor houses the Student 
Affairs offices of the Vice President, 
Assistant Vice President, Residence Life 
and Housing, Multicultural Affairs, 
New Student Programs, Greek Life and 
Student Organizations, and Judicial 
Affairs and Student Assistance. The 
Student Services, Inc. Business Office 
and the departments ot Student 
Programming and Activities, along with 
student clubs and organizations, are also 
located on the second floor 
The third floor Frederick Douglass 
Lounge Area features a 20-unit com- 
puter lab with quiet study and seminar 



Universirv' Sen-ices and Snidcnt Living 



space. Sykes Union also features 13 
meeting rooms accommodating groups 
from 5 to 500. 

For information concerning Sykes 
Union please call the Information 
Center at 610-436-3360/2984. 

Women's Center 

The Women's Center addresses the spe- 
cial concerns particular to women, 
including the issues facing women stu- 
dents who enter the University from 
high school or return to college after 
time at home or in the job world. 
Located in Lawrence Center on the sec- 
ond floor, the Women's Center provides 
a lounge area for conversation, as well as 
study, peer advising, support for personal 
and professional issues, and special 
interest programs (lectures, films, and 
concerts). For more information, includ- 
ing opportunities for student volunteers, 
caU 610-436-2122. 

Children's Center 

The Children's Center for the children 
of West Chester University students and 
employees is located in McCarthy Hall. 
The children participate in educational 
and developmental programs while their 
parents are in class or at work. The cen- 
ter is licensed by the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania, and all required registra- 
tion materials must be completed prior 
to enrollment in the center. The center 
offers reduced rates to students and 
multiple child discounts. For more 
information, contact the Children's 
Center at 610-436-2388. 

Graduate Student Association 

The Graduate Student Association 
(GSA) is the student government of all 
persons enrolled in graduate programs. 
The primar}' objective of GSA is to 
promote the overall well-being of grad- 
uate students at West Chester Univ- 
ersity. AH graduate students are mem- 
bers of the association by virtue of their 
graduate status. The GSA office is 
located in Sykes Student Union. 

Black Student Union 

The Black Student Union, which was 
formed in 1971, is dedicated to the cre- 
ation of a culturally meaningful atmos- 
phere for black students at West 
Chester University. Black Student 
Union membership is open to all West 
Chester students, faculty, and staff — 
regardless of race, color, or creed — who 
have a concern for black social, political. 



cultural, and economic causes. 
A major purpose of the organization is 
to broaden and enhance the academic 
and social life for black students at the 
University. The union's democratically 
structured constitution provides for an 
executive board, elected by the member- 
ship. The Black Student Union Office is 
located in 234 Sykes Student Union. 

International Education 

The Otfice of International Programs is 
responsible for international student serv- 
ices, visits by foreign scholars, and immi- 
gration services for faculty and staff. In 
addition, the office coordinates study 
abroad opportunities for semester and 
summer programs. Anyone interested in 
receiving information or assistance con- 
cerning immigration regulations and 
services for international students, 
scholars, and faculty is encouraged to 
contact the Office of International 
Programs. While semester-long study 
abroad programs are not generally avail- 
able for graduate students, some sum- 
mer study abroad opportunities may be 
acceptable for credit. Students interested 
in study abroad should contact the 
Office of International Programs at 
610-436-3515. 

Institute for Women 

The Institute for Women was initially 
designed to serve as the parent organi- 
zation to represent the interests of 
women on campus. The institute is an 
independent body headed by a director 
and board of directors. Along with the 
Commission on the Status of Women, 
Women's Center, and Women's Studies 
Program, the Institute for Women 
engages in campus activities for the ben- 
efit of women students, faculty, and 
staff 

The institute sponsors a number of 
activities to enhance the self-esteem and 
career success of women at the 
University: the Woman-in-Residence 
Program, Graduate Grant, and 
Endowed Book Fund. The institute pre- 
pares periodic reports on the status of 
women at the University and also 
secures Charlotte W. Newcombe 
Scholarship Grants for mature second- 
career women. The Institute for Women 
offers an annual grant of $750 to a 
woman graduate student who is accept- 
ed into a master's degree program at 
West Chester University. Application 
and reference forms may be obtained 
from the Office of Graduate Studies in 



McKelvie Hall. For more information 
call 610-436-2940. 

Veterans Affairs 

Under the provisions of Title 38, West 
Chester Universit)' is an accredited uni- 
versity for the education of veterans. 
The University cooperates with the 
Veterans Administration to see that 
honorably separated or discharged veter- 
ans receive every consideration consis- 
tent with either degree or nondegree 
admission standards. 
All veterans, certain dependents of dis- 
abled or deceased veterans, and war 
orphans who wish to obtain educational 
benefits under the appropriate public laws 
must register with the Veterans Affairs 
Office at initial registration. Veterans 
must renew their registration with this 
office at the beginning of each subsequent 
semester and each summer session. The 
Veterans Administration requires students 
who are veterans to schedule at least nine 
credits per semester in order to receive 
ftiU benefits under the G.I. Bill. 
A representative of the Veterans 
Administration is in the office of 
Financial Aid, 138 Elsie O. Bull Center, 
to counsel and act as a Uaison between 
students and the Veterans Affairs Office 
in financial and other matters. 

The Frederick Douglass Society 

Drawing its content from our campus his- 
tory of social consciousness and its struc- 
ture from a variety of models in public life, 
the Frederick Douglass Society of West 
Chester Universit)' is an organization of 
faculty, staff, and students who embrace 
Frederick Douglass' quest for freedom and 
inclusiveness. Named in 1983 for one of 
the 19th century's most distinguished 
advocates of human freedom, the organi- 
zation is oriented toward self-help and 
improvement by offering a coUecrive voice 
in the affairs of the University. Its pro- 
grams also aim to stimulate other groups 
on campus to enrich the climate. The soci- 
ety annually raises money for scholarship 
funds, including the Frederick Douglass 
Junior Ambassador Scholars of West 
Chester University. It also seeks, by the 
example of Douglass, to promote an intel- 
lectual standard that is not only grounded 
in excellence but profoundly rooted in the 
public mission of higher education. 

Honor Societies 

The University participates in sponsor- 
ing an active chapter of Phi Delta 
Kappa, the international graduate honor 



University Services and Student Living 



society in education. Membership in the 
West Chester chapter, which was organ- 
ized in 1956, is by invitation and recog- 
nizes scholarship in all fields ot study. 
Graduate students are eligible to partici- 
pate in the activities ot the undergraduate 
honor societies at West Chester University 
if they are members. These organizations 
are Alpha Epsilon, Alpha Kappa Delta, 
Alpha Lambda Delta, /Vlpha Mu 
Gamma, Alpha Psi Omega, Eta Sigma 
Gamma, Gamma Theta Upsilon, Kappa 
Delta Pi, Pi Gamma Mu, Phi Kappa 
Delta, Pi Kappa Delta, Pi Kappa 1 -ambda, 
Pi Mu EpsUon, Phi Alpha Theta, Phi 
Delta Kappa, Phi Epsilon Kappa, Phi Mu 
Alpha Sinfonia, Phi Sigma Tau, Psi Chi, 
Sigma Alpha Iota, and Sigma Tau Delta. 

The Student Activities Council 

The Student Activities Council (SAC) is 
one of the major programming organiza- 
tions at West Chester Universitv. Totally 
Rinded and voluntarily run by students, 
SAC creates and coordinates many of the 
activities and events on campus. By utiliz- 
ing students' talents and energies, SAC 
strives to present a wide variety of pro- 
grams that meet the needs and interests 
of the West Chester community. SAC is 
composed of six committees and an exec- 
utive board, which presents programs in 
the areas of concerts, comedy, films, off- 
campus trips, and novelties. SAC also 
plays a major role in the planning and 
implementation of special events such as 
Welcome Back Week, Homecoming, and 
Spring Weekend. Membership is open to 
all students at all times. The Student 
Activities Council is located in 218 Sykes 
Student Union, 610-436-2336/3037. 

Recreation and Leisure Programs 

The Office of Recreation and Leisure 
Programs provides a variety of recreational 
opportunities for the Universit)' communi- 
ty. Tlirough participation, individuals are 
afforded an opportunity to improve their 
health and experience recreational activities 
that will enhance their use of leisure time. 
Intramural Sports affords students the 
opportunity' to participate in individual 
or team competitive activities. The 
Intramural Sports program promotes 
health, wellness, and phvsical fitness, as 
well as encourages the worthy use of 
leisure time. Regardless of ability level, 
every individual can experience success- 
ful participation in a variety of individ- 
ual or team athletic events. 
For students who enjoy highlv competi- 
tive, instructional, or recreational sports 



other than varsity athletics, the office pro- 
vides a Sports Club program. Becoming 
a member of a club provides opportuni- 
ties for instruction, socialization, competi- 
tion, and Rin. Currently, West Chester 
University provides 1 1 Sports Clubs: 
equestrian, fencing, ice hockey, shotokan 
karate, men's lacrosse, men's roller hockey, 
men's rugby, skating, skiing, men's volley- 
ball, and women's water polo. 
Outdoor recreational opportunities are 
conducted through the Outdoor Ad- 
venture Program. The Outdoor Adven- 
ture Program provides a variety of differ- 
ent trips and one-day activities including 
canoeing, caving, rock climbing, ski trips, 
backpacking, and camping. Outdoor 
recreation equipment such as backpacks, 
tents, sleeping bags, camping equipment, 
snow boards, cross-country skis, and 
mountain bikes are available to rent. 
For students who do not wish to partici- 
pate in formal programs, Open Recrea- 
tion provides days, times, and facihties 
in which students may participate in 
informal recreational activity utilizing 
the swimming pools, indoor/outdoor 
tracks, outdoor tennis courts, basketball 
gymnasiums, and sand volleyball courts. 
The Fitness Center in Sykes Union is 
designed to give students a professional 
setting for exercise and weight training. 
The Sykes Fitness Center is equipped 
with cardiovascular and pin-selectorized 
equipment, and Olympic free weights. 
The center also includes an aerobics stu- 
dio where sessions are held. A valid stu- 
dent ID is necessary for admission to 
the center and an orientation session is 
also required for all participants. 
The Aerobics program is one of our most 
popular activities, with over 800 students, 
participating in more than 30 different 
aerobic sessions. AH participants must 
register for this program and a $15 
semester fee is charged for participation. 
For more information call the Office of 
Recreation and Leisure Programs, 610- 
436-2131, or stop by Room 133, 
Ehinger Gymnasium. 

Department of Counseling and 
Psychological Services 

The Department of Counseling and 
Psychological Services (the Counseling 
Center) is located on the second floor of 
Lawrence Center, 610-436-2301. 
Services are available to all currently 
enrolled undergraduate and graduate 
students. The Counseling Center 
includes licensed psychologists, consult- 



ing psychiatrists, and graduate-level 
trainees with whom students may dis- 
cuss their concerns in strict confidence. 

COUNSELING SERVICES 

Since the Counseling Center provides 
services for a wide range of concerns, 
each student's experience will be tailored 
to his or her needs. Students may wish 
to improve their interpersonal skills, 
resolve personal conflicts, or clarify their 
educational or vocational choices. Any of 
the following approaches may be imple- 
mented to address a student's concerns: 

1. Individual psychological counseling 

consists of a one-to-one experience 
where the focus is on resolving person- 
al conflicts and conflicts with others, 
and on improving the student's expert- 
ise at making meaningfiil choices. It 
may also help people avoid choosing 
behaviors that restrict personal growth 
and undermine their well-being. 

2. Group counseling consists of a small 
number of peers with one or two 
counselors. Such groups meet once 
each week to help group members 
learn about themselves. Groups may 
or may not have a specific focus. Past 
groups with a focus have included 
students who have experienced the 
death of a parent, bad habits which 
block personal grovrth, eating disor- 
ders, and assertiveness training. 
General counseling groups have 
included those for interpersonal prob- 
lem solving and for female students. 

3. Individual vocational counseling con- 

sists of a one-to-one experience that 
focuses on clarifying the student's 
choice of concentration and vocation. 
Vocational choice is most solid when 
it is the outgrowth of understanding 
oneself Such understanding is 
advanced by the thoughtfiil explo- 
ration of values, interests, and abilities. 

4. Testing may include psychological or 

vocational interest tests which can clari- 
fy educational and vocational planning. 
The student and counselor can deter- 
mine whether such testing might be 
helpfiil. Arrangements also can be 
made at the Counseling Center for tak- 
ing the Miller Analogies Test, a gradu- 
ate school admissions examination. 

5. Consultation services for staff and 
faculty are available on a limited 
basis. Psychologists may be able to 
assist with crises, program planning, 
group and interpersonal communica- 
tions, and referral to other agencies. 



Structure of the University 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 


COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 


Charles D. Hurt, Dean 




Tony W. Johnson, Dean 




Anthropolog)' and Sociology 


History 


Counseling and Educational 


Elementary Education 


Biology 


Holocaust and Genocide 


Psychology 


Literacy 


Chemistry 


Studies 


Early Childhood and Special 


Professional and Secondary 


Communication Studies 


Mathematics 


Education 


Education 


Computer Science 


Philosophy 






English 


Physics 






Foreign Languages 


Psychology 


COLLEGE OF HEALTH SCIENCES 


Geology and Astronomy 




Donald E. Barr, Dean 





COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AND PUBLIC 
AFFAIRS 

Christopher M. Fiorentino, Dean 
Accounting Marketing 

Criminal Justice Political Science 

Economics and Finance Social Work 

Geography and Planning Social Work - Graduate 

Management 



Communicative Disorders Nursing 

Health Sports Medicine 

Kinesiology 

COLLEGE OF VISUAL AND PERFORMING 
ARTS 

Timothy V. Blair, Dean 

Art 

School of Music 

Applied Music 

Music Education 



Music History and 
Literature 
Music Theor}'/ 
Theatre and Dance 



Programs of Study and Course Offerings 



Guide to the Catalog 

The arrangement of course offerings is alphabetical by either 
department or program of study. 

Students may obtain a typical sequence of courses tor any pro- 
gram from the office specified in this catalog. 
Please note that all courses, course descriptions, course 
sequences, and course substitutions are subject to change. 
Current information is available from the appropriate depart- 
ment chair, graduate coordinator, or program adviser. 
For a guide to course prefixes, see page 102. 



Administration 



Accounting — See Business 



Administration 

Graduate Business Center 

1 160 McDermott Drive 

West Chester Universiry 

West Chester, Pennsylvania 19383 

610-436-2438 

Fax: 610-436-3047 

E-mail; msai^'Hvcupa.edu 

Dr. Duane D. Milne, Director, M.SJl. Program 

PROFESSORS 

Douglas McConatha, Ph.D., Anthropology and Sociology (Long- 
Term Care) 
Jack Orr, Ph.D., Communication Studies (Training and Development) 
Joan Welch, Ph.D., Geography and Planning (Regional Planning) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Raytnoiid Zetts, F.d.D., Kinesiology' (Sport and Athletic Administration) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Lisa Millhous, Ph.D., Communication Studies (Leadership for 

Women) 
Duane D. Milne, Ph.D., Political Science (Human Resources 

Management; Individualized; Public Administration) 

Program of Study 

The master of science in administration (M.S.A.) is a multidiscipli- 
nary degree with areas of concentration in leadership for women, 
long-term care, human resource management, individualized, public 
administration, regional planning, sport and athletic administration, 
and training and development. 

The degree is designed for individuals with professional work expe- 
rience who desire to enhance their administrative and management 
skills at the supervisory and mid-management levels. It is highly 
preferred that applicants have a minimum of two years' fliU-time 
work experience prior to beginning their studies. Students who lack 
the requisite work experience and/or plan to change careers must 
incorporate relevant internships and other job experiences into their 
programs, which may require program enrollment bevond the mini- 
mum requirements stipulated in this catalog. 
Undergraduate prerequisite requirements might be necessary for 
applicants without adequate preparation in the intended area of 
concentration. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ADMINISTRATION 

(36-42 semester hours) 

The curriculum consists of 18 semester hours in the administrative 

core plus 18-24 semester hours in a selected concentration area: 



1. Administrative core (required): ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 

2. Areas of concentration* 

a. Human resources management (See page 30.) 

b. Individualized (See page 30.) 

c. Leadership for women (See pages 31, 74—75.) 

d. Long-term care (See pages 31, 32.) 

e. Public administration (Sec pages 31, 91.) 
f Regional planning (See pages 31, 62.) 

g. Sport and athletic administration (See pages 31, 73.) 
h. Training and development (See page 31.) 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
degree program at West Chester University, applicants must submit 
scores from the Miller Analogies Test, Graduate Record Examina- 
tion, or Graduate Management Admissions Test; a personal state- 
ment with a clear focus on career plans; a resume; and two letters of 
reference from professional supervisors that address the applicant's 
management potential. Standardized test scores are not required 
from applicants with earned master's degrees. 
AH application materials are to be submitted to the Office of 
Graduate Studies and labeled: "Attention, M.S.A. Application of 
(student's name)." After these materials have been received by the 
Office of Graduate Studies and Extended Education, the M.S.A. 
director will schedule an admissions interview with the applicant. 

Deadline for Applications 

Normally, the application process must be completed and admission 
granted prior to course enrollment for the fall or spring semesters. 
The deadline for applying for the fall semester is May 15 and for 
spring semester, November 15. 

All applications must be submitted on the approved WCU graduate 
application forms available from the Office of Graduate Studies. 

Comprehensive Examination 

No comprehensive examination is required for the administrative 
core. However, in lieu of an examination, each of the six administra- 
tive core courses must be completed with a grade of at least "B." 
Selected concentrations in the M.S.A. program do require compre- 
hensive examinations. Students are obligated to comply with concen- 
tration comprehensive examination policies in effect on the date of 
their admission to the program. Students must clarify the require- 
ments for their programs with the appropriate concentration adviser. 

'Refer to departmental listings for concentration course descriptions. 



Certificate in Administration 

Dr. Milne, M.S^. Director 

The certificate in administration is designed for persons who desire 
to enhance their management and supervisory skills. To earn the 
certificate, students must complete the 18-semester hour adminis- 
trative core vnth a minimum grade of "B" in each course. Those 
interested in the certificate option must follow and meet the same 
admissions criteria as master's degree students. 



Degree students also may apply for the certificate after completing 
the administrative core requirements with a minimum grade of "B" 
for each course. 



Curriculum 
Administrative Core 

ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 



18 semester hours 



Administration 



COURSK DKSCRIPTIONS 
ADMIMSTR-VnON 
Symbol: ADM 

500 Methods and Materials of Research (3) 

Logic of scientific methodolog^■ and research 
design construction. Emphasizes hypothesis devel- 
opment and testing, data collection, measurement 
problems, and theor\' application. 

501 Administrative Theory and Environment 
(3) Organizational theorj and practice in public 
and private institutions. Legal framework for 
administration, application ot public policy, soci- 
olegal issues, and values ot societ)' considered. 

502 Computers for Managers (3) Quantitative 
applications in administration. Computer as a 
management tool. Computer basics and manage- 
ment information systems. 

503 Accounting and Budgeting (3) A study of 
accounting principles and procedures for both 
profit and not-for-profit organizations. Emphasis 
is on the concepts and effects of policies and pro- 
cedures with which the administrator will normal- 
ly come into contact. 

504 Communications for Administrators (3) 
Development ot communication skills for the 
ctfective writing ot letters, memos, reports, and 
proposals. Structuring and conducting presenta- 
tions and meetings. 

505 Organizing Human Resources (3) 
Administrative models and concepts of human 
behavior in formal organizations and decision 



processes. Personnel administration. Eftcctive 
selection, use, and development of human re- 
sources for the total organization. Affirmative 
action and equal opportunitii'. 
507 Liability for Managers (3) Study of the civil 
and criminal liability' ol managers in the for-profit 
and not-for-profit sectors. Review of the laws of 
defense and liability protection for individuals and 
organizations. Facility safety, liabilit)- issues, and 
personnel law emphasized. 

520 Topics in Administration (3) Intensive study 
ot selected topics in administration or human 
resource management current to the interests and 
needs of professionals. Topics will var)'. 
525 Grant Writing (3) Art of grant writing via 
proposal development processes. Targeting propos- 
als to public and private agencies. 

551 FoundationsofHR Management (3) 
Addresses the tlindamcntal management practices 
performed by HR professionals. Examines various 
HR roles, organizational structures, leadership, 
employee involvement strategies, and ethics. 
Relevant HR research designs and methodologies 
also emphasized. 

552 Staffing and Development (3) Examines all 
legal and regulator)' factors affecting staff selection 
and development. Includes all applicable federal 
laws and practices as well as employee orientation, 
training, and development. 

553 Employee Relations (3) Emphasizes employ- 
ee relationships with management, particularly in 



a nonunion environment. Covers issues such as 
policy formulation, compliant systems, employee 
rights, performance appraisals, employee morale 
and motivation, and factors affecting employee 
health, safen; and security. 

554 Labor Relations (3) Analyzes labor-manage- 
ment relationships, particularly with respect to fed- 
eral laws and regulations, administration of labor 
contracts, mediation, and arbitration processes. 
Incorporates all legal aspects of collective bargain- 
ing as well as related practices, and strategies of 
negotiation, unfair labor practices, and the man- 
agement ot organization - union relations. 

555 Compensation Analysis and Benefits 
Planning (3) Examines the legal and regulatory 
factors affecting compensation and benefits 
administration. Reviews compensation philoso- 
phies and economic factors affecting pay plans, as 
well as the type and characteristics of specific 
compensation and benefits programs. 

556 HR Pro-Seminar (3) The capstone cour« for 
the M.S.A.-HR program. Integrates material 
from all pre\'ious HR courses by having students 
achieve applications ot the common body of 
knowledge required for professional certification. 
Course based on the case study method and team 
management methodologies. 

600 Research Report (3) A capstone research 

project. 

612 Internship (3-6) Intensive field placement in 

an organization through facult>' guidance and 

supervision. Precontracted learning objectives. 



Human Resources Management 

Dr. Milne, M.Sji. Director ind Concentration Adviser 
This concentration is designed for individuals who want to enhance 
their knowledge of personnel administration. It is appropriate both for 
persons interested in human resources management as a career as well 
as for operations managers who want to enhance their supervisory 
skills in employee assessment, placement, evaluation, and development. 

Curriculum 39-42 semester hours 

1. Administrative Core 
ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 

2. Human Resources Management Core 
ADM 551, 552, 553, 554, 555, and 556 

3. Internship 
ADM 612 (3-6) 

Required for students without appropriate HR professional experi- 
ence as determined by concentration adviser. 



18 semester hours 

18 semester hours 

3-6 semester hours 



Certificate in Human Resources Management 

The certificate in human resource management is designed for 
graduate students who want to enhance their skills and knowledge 
in the area of human resources. Students may earn the certificate by 
completing each of the following human resources management 
courses with a minimum grade of B in each: ADM 551, 552, 553, 
554, 555, and 556. 

Degree students in the M.S.A. human resources concentration are 
eligible for the certificate after completing the stated requirements. 
Individuals with a bachelor's degree may pursue the certificate inde- 
pendent of the fiJI M.S.A. degree. Such applicants must apply 
under the professional growth admissions category' and must meet 
ail the admissions requirements required for the M.S.A. degree. 



Individualized Concentration 

Dr. Milne, M.S.A. Director and Concentration Adviser 
This concentration is designed for individuals who have achieved 
career success in their chosen fields. Those admitted to the concen- 
tration will enhance their knowledge base by enrolling in an indi- 
vidually developed set of courses after consultation with and 
approval by the concentration adviser. 



Curriculum 

1. Administrative Core 

ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 

2. Individualized Core 

A. Required (3 credits) 

ADM 600, focused on career goals 



39-42 semester hours 
1 8 semester hours 

18 semester hours 



B. Electives (15 credits) 

Subject to advisement and approval bv concentration adviser. 
Courses to be selected from among 500-600 level WCU grad- 
uate courses designed to fulfill the personal program proposal. 
Internship 3-6 semester hours 

Required for students without sufficient, relevant administrative expe- 
rience. Internships are in addition to the 15 credit hours of electives 
for such students. Internships are not required for students with suffi- 
cient management experience. However, these students may enroll for 
relevant internships as part of the 15-hour elective credits require- 
ment, provided the work requirements of such are different from the 
student's regular work assignments (i.e., students cannot earn intern- 
ship credit by performing their regular work responsibilities). The 
internship arrangement/requirements arc to be confirmed in writing. 



Anthropology and Sociology 



Training and Development 

I )r. Orr, Concentration Adviser 

Ur. Milne, M.SJl. Director 

This concentration prepares training and development supervisors 

who, in turn, develop and coordinate in-house programs and staff 

development services tor line managers. 

Curriculum 39-42 semester hours 

1. Administrative Core 18 semester hours 

ADM SOI, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 

2. Training and Development Core 18 semester hours 

A. Rciiuircd courses 

ADM 552, COM 570 and 571, PSY 567 

B. Cognate courses (six semester hours, three from each category) 



1. Industrial Organization Psychology 

Elective selected under advisement from among 
PSY 560, 562, 563, or 564. 

2. Communication Studies 

Selected with approval of concentration adviser from among 

graduate courses in communication studies. 
Internship 3-6 semester hours 

ADM 612 

Required for those students who do not have appropriate training 
and development experience. 

NOTE: In conjunction with the administrative core of 18 required 
credits, the M.S.A./training and development concentration 
requires a minimum of 36 semester hours, exclusive of internship. 



Leadership for Women 

Dr. Millhous, Concentration /hh'iser 
Dr. Milne, M.S^. Director 

The leadership for women concentration, offered by the women's 
studies program, is designed to enable the student to develop a 
mode of leadership appropriate to workplaces in which access to 
organizational power is inequitable for sexes oi equal training and 
talent. There is both a master's degree program and a certificate 
program. See the "Leadership for Women" section for further infor- 
mation and course descriptions. 

Long-Term Care 

Dr. McConatha, Concentration Adviser 
Dr. Milne, M.S^. Director 

The long-term care concentration meets the needs ot persons inter- 
ested in entering the field of long-term care, and of those persons 
presently in long-term care who are interested in career advance- 
ment. Also offered is a certificate in gerontology. See "Anthropology 
and Sociology" for flirther information and course descriptions. 

Public Administration 

Dr. Milne, M.S.A. Director znd Concentration Adviser 
The concentration in public administration, offered by the Depart- 
ment of Political Science, focuses on public-sector management at the 
local and regional levels. It is appropriate for managers and officials 



fiom local, count)', and regional government bodies who desire to 
enhance their general management skills as well as gain insight into 
public policy issues of particular concern to these officials. See 
"Political Science" for fiirther information and course descriptions. 



Regional Planning 

Dr. Welch, Concentration Adviser 
Dr. Milne, M.S^. Director 

The regional planning concentration, offered by the Department of 
Geography and Planning, focuses on land use development and man- 
agement at the local, county, and regional levels. It is an appropriate 
concentration for those who desire to enhance their knowledge of com- 
prehensive planning, zoning and mapping, and demographic and envi- 
ronmental impacts. See "Geography and Planning" for additional infor- 
mation and course descriptions. 

Sport and Athletic Administration 

Dr. Zetts, Concentration Adviser 
Dr. Milne, M.S^. Director 

The sport and athletic administration degree, offered by the 
Department of Kinesiology, focuses on the development of adminis- 
trators who aspire to leadership roles in athletics, and who must 
adapt to the ever-changing responsibilities of interscholastic and 
intercollegiate athletics. See "Kinesiology" for further information 
and course descriptions. 



Anthropology and Sociology 

lOlC Old Library Building 
West Chester Universirv 
West Chester, PA 19383 
610-436-2556 
Dr. Morales, Chairfierson 

Dr. McConatha, Coordinator of Graduate Studies and M.S^. Long- 
Term Care Concentration Adviser 

PROFESSORS 

Helen A. Berger, Ph.D., New York University 
Harvey C. Greisman, Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Douglas McConatha, Ph.D., University of Utah 



Edmundo Morales, Ph.D., City University of New York 
Leigh Shaffer, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Paul A. Stoller, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Bonita Freeman-Whitthoft, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Susan L. Johnston, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Patrick W. Luck, Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Anthony Zumpetta, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
The Department of Anthropology and Sociology offers, on a limit- 
ed basis, graduate courses in anthropology and sociology to graduate 



Art 



students lirom other areas as well as to advanced undergraduate 
majors and nonmajors. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ADMINISTRATION 
Concentration in Long-Term Care 

The master of science in administration with a concentration in 
long-term care is designed to meet the needs of individuals interest- 
ed in advancing their careers in the growing field of services, pro- 
grams, and facilities focusing on the needs of the elderly. The long- 
term care program is a multidisciplinary program with major course 
components in the colleges of Arts.and Sciences, Business and 
Public Affairs, and Health Sciences. 

Applicants for admission to the M.S.A. program must meet the 
basic requirements for the Universit}' as explained in this catalog. 
Applicants must submit scores from one of the following graduate 
entrance exams: Miller Analogies Test (MAT), Graduate Record 
Exam (GRE), or Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). 



39 semester hours 
18 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Administrative Core Requirements 

ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 

II. Health Studies Requirements 6 ^mester hours 
HF.A520and531 

in. Long-Term Care Requirements 15 semester hours 

HEA 630 and 631, SOC 519 and 522, and 
HEA/SOC Field Placement (taken following course work) 



Gerontology Certificate 

The certiticate in gcrontolog)' is an interdisciplinary program designed 
to serve individuals who are now employed or anticipate working in 
the field of aging. Students will broaden their formal and practical 
knowledge of the elderly while gaining research and service experience 
in gerontology. The certificate program provides students with nadon- 
allv recognized documentation of their academic training in the field. 



18 semester hours 
9 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Certificate Core Courses 

SOC 522, SOC 518, SOC 519 or SOC 590 

II. Electives 9 semester hours 
In addition to the certificate core, three elective courses chosen 
under advisement with the director of the University Gerontology 
Center arc required. Students should check with their current aca- 
demic adviser to determine the availablity ot currently approved 
electives. Electives may be selected firom the following departments: 

Administration Kinesiology 

Communicative Disorders Psychology 

Counselor Education Social Work 

Geography Sociology 
Health 

For fiirther information contact Dr. Douglas McConatha, director of 
the University Gerontology Center, Department of Anthropology 
and Sociology, 610-436-3125. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ANTHROPOLOGY 

Symbol: ANT 

512 Ethnographic Studies (3) Intensive survey of 
a single culture area. Area for study announced in 
advance. 

599 Independent Studies in Anthropology (1-3) 

I'REKEQ; Approval of instructor and department 
chairperson. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Symbol: SOC 

515 Mental Illness in Social Context (3) A soci- 
ological perspective on the cause and treatment of 



mental disorders, including a critical analysis of 
public policy on mental health services. 

518 Applied Gerontology (3) Design and devel- 
opment of programs to provide services for the 
aging population in order to assist them to live as 
independent members of their communities. 

519 Geriatrics (3) A detailed discussion of physi- 
cal and mental disabilities and diseases that often 
accompany the aging process. Methods of treat- 
ment for these disorders will also be presented. 
Opportunities for short-term placement in long- 
term care facilities may be available. 



522 Gerontology (3) Information on past and 
present trends concerning services to the elderly. 
Discussions on contemporary gerontological prob- 
lems and factors affecting the treatment of the 
elderly. This broad-based, introductory course is 
for those interested in the aging population. 
532 History of Sociological Theory (3) 
Development of sociological thought. 
590 Independent Studies in Sociology (1-3) 
PREliEQ^ Approval of instructor and department 
chairperson. 



Art 

MitcheU HaU 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2755 

Mr. Baker, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS 

John Baker, M.F.A., University of Delaware 

Richard E. Blake, B.RA., Tyler School of Art of Temple University 

Gus V. Sermas, M.F.A., University of Wisconsin 

ASSOCL\TE PROFESSORS 

Virginia da Costa, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara 



Belle C. Hollon, M.F.A., University of Wisconsin 

Henry P. Loustau, M.F.A., University of Illinois at Urbana - 

Champaign 
Nancy J. Rumficld, V\i.\i..,Nova Southeastern University 
Donna Usher, M.F.A., University of Delaware 
Linwood J. White, M.F.A., University of Pennsylvania 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Margaret Schiff Hill, M.F.A., Syracuse University 

Cecily Moon, M.F.A., Long Island University 

The Department of Art offers, on a limited basis, graduate courses 

in art to graduate students from other areas. 



Biology 



COURSK DESCRIPTIONS 
ART 

Symbol; ART unless otherwise noted. 

ARH 500 Art Seminar (3) Special topics to be 
iinnounced tor stutlio and art history. Oftercd 
periodically as appropriate. PRKRF.Q^ Permission 
ot instructor. 

516-517 Painting I-ll (3) (3) Extensive experi- 
mentation m studio problems and directions. The 
strategies ot technique and a personal st)'lc arc 
explored. F.acb section of this course varies with 
the instructor. 

520 Painting: Independent Projects (3) Individu- 
alized instruction at an advanced level. Develop- 
ment ot professional, personal, and imaginative 
statements leading to formation of the student's 
pictori;U identity. 

521 Sculpture I (3) Introduction to sculpture via 
the fundamentals of 3-D design. Use of basic 
tools, development ot skills, techniques, and 
processes in creating sculpture. I'rojects in plaster, 
clay, stone, and wood. 

525 Multimedia Workshop in Sculpture III (3) 



I'abrication methods and techniques, using wood, 
plastic, and various metals. 

531 Ceramics I (3) Ceramic techniques and aes- 
thetics ot clay, leading toward development of cre- 
ative expression. Exercises in hand-built and 
wheel-thrown forms. Formulation of clay bodies, 
glaze bodies, and calculations; loading and kiln fir- 
ing techniques. Also, basic exercises for elementary 
and secondary teaching levels. 

532 Ceramics II (3) Further development of 
expression for those who have mastered basic 
ceramic processes. Research in clay bodies, glaze 
chemistry, firing techniques, and kiln construction. 
Creative problems. 

533 Ceramics: Studio Problems (3) Individual 
projects involving the total or specialized areas of 
the ceramic process. Practical experience through 
helping to maintain the ceramic complex. 

534 Ceramics: Independent Projects (3) 

541 Printmaking: Relief, Independent Projects 
(3) Advanced study with individualized instruc- 
tion. Collagraph, lino-cut, and woodcut tech- 
niques. Combining various printing processes with 
relief printmaking. 



546 Drawing: Independent Projects (3) 

Advanced study with individualized instruction. 
Emphasis on professional, personal, and imagina- 
tive statements leading to the student's icono- 
graphic identity. 

551 Art Education in the Elementary School (3) 

Current trends in art education for the elementary 
school. 

552 Basic Photography (3) A course in the 
basics of photography. Includes techniques for 
camera handling, film and print processing, and 
photographic images manipulation. Students must 
supply their own 35mm adjustable camera as well 
as printing and processing materials. 

553 Intermediate Photography (3) An interme- 
diate course for those who have had a basic pho- 
tography course or previous photographic experi- 
ence. Students must supply 35mm adjustable cam- 
era and printing and processing materials. PRE- 
REQ: ART 552. 

554 Advanced Still Photography (3) Lecture and 
laboratory experiences in large format, and electron- 
ic visual production. PREREQi ART 552 and 553. 
590 Independent Studies in Art (1-3) 



Astronomy - See Geology and Astronomy 



Biology 



217 Boucher Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2856 

Dr. Wabcr, Chairperson 

Dr. Casotti, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Sharon E. Began, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale 

John T. Beneski, Jr., Ph.D., Washington State University 

Steven L. Broitman, Ph.D., Princeton University 

G. Winfield Fairchild, Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Frank Eliot Fish, Ph.D., Michigan State University 

Maureen T. Knabb, Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Leslie B. Slusher, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Hart)' M. Tiebout III, Ph.D., University of Florida 

JackWaber, Ph.D., University of Hawaii 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Giovanni Casotti, Ph.D., Murdoch University 
Gustave Mbuy, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Russell H. Vreeland, Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Judith J. Greenamyer, D.V.M., Ohio State University 
Greg Turner, Ph.D., Fordham University 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the general requirements for admission to 
degree study at West Chester University. Applicants must submit 
three letters of recommendation as part of their application to gradu- 
ate study. Applicants must include a one-page written statement that 
outlines their reasons for pursuing graduate study in biologj' and the 
specific area of biology in which they are interested. Applicants must 
fill out a supplemental application for graduate study in biology by 
the end ot their first semester of stud); a\ailablc from the biology 
coordinator, in which they identify their preferred adviser and indicate 
whether they intend to pursue the thesis or nonthesis option, and 



whether they intend to be a fiill-time or part-time student. 
Minimum academic prerequisites for admission include two semes- 
ters of general chemistry, two semesters of organic chemistry, one 
semester of physics, one semester of calculus, and 17 semester cred- 
its of course work in the biological sciences. Because of space and 
personnel limitations, admission of academically qualified applicants 
is contingent upon the availability of laborator)' space, the adviser 
whom they identify, and the appropriateness of the student's back- 
ground to the chosen area of concentration. 
The M.S. in biology may be completed under either the thesis or 
nonthesis option. Switching between the two options is possible 
early in the program, but will require the student to organize a new 
advisory committee, take additional courses, and spend additional 
time completing the program. 

The supplemental application form will not be required to be 
admitted into the graduate program. Instead, students (thesis and 
nonthesis) will have until the end of their fu'st semester to choose 
an adviser and a committee. Continued enrollment in the program 
is contingent upon the student finding a faculty member who is 
willing to act as his or her adviser. 

DEADLINE DATES FOR APPLICATIONS: AprU 15 for all 
students wishing to be considered for graduate assistantships for the 
following September, April 15 for the fall semester; October 15 for 
the spring semester. Students who do not wish an assistantship can 
applv throughout the year to enter the program. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN BIOLOGY 
Curriculum 

Thesis Oprion 30 semester hoars 

I. Required Core 9 semester hours 

BIO 591, 592', 610 



Students cannot enroll in BIO 592 urJess they have (1) obtained a letter 
grade for BIO 591, and (2) been admitted to degree candidacy. 



Hiolo^A' 



II. Electives 21 semester hours 

Group I" (choose from three to seven courses) 
BIO 511, 513, 514, 515, 535, 536, 537 

Group II (choose up to four courses, but no more 

than six semester hours at the 400-level) 

BIO 531, 564, 565, 566, 567, 568, 570, 571, 575, 
576, 580, 584, 421, 428, 429, 435-438, 448, 452. 
454, 456, 457, 472, 473, 474, 485 

See general information for details and restrictions. 
To complete BIO 591 successfiJly, the student must present the 
thesis proposal to his/her thesis advisory committee and demon- 
strate a fiindamcntal understanding of the principles of biology 
underlying the proposed research. At that time, the committee also 
will examine the student on his/her understanding of other related 
areas of biolog)'. Students who demonstrate a poor understanding ot 
their chosen field must correct their deficiencies. 
To complete BIO 610 successfully, the student must present the 
thesis research in an open seminar and also pass a final thesis 
defense before the thesis committee. The degree will not be award- 
ed until the thesis has been accepted by the student's committee and 
signed by the dean of graduate studies. 

Part-Time Students 

Part-time students will be required to take the same group of courses as 
fiill-time students except they must complete BIO 591 (thesis proposal) 
by the end of their third year. As with the fldl-time students, part-time 
students cannot sign up for BIO 592 unless they have obtained a letter 
grade for BIO 591. In addition, they must sign up for BIO 610 (thesis) 
by the start of their sLxth year and complete it by the end ot that year. 



36 semester hours 
24 semester hours 



Nonthesis Option 

I . Required Core 

BIO 511 

Three research techniques courses: BIO 513, 514, 515 
Three different course topics areas: BIO 535, 536, 537 
BIO 591 

II. Electives 12 semester hours 
See general information for details and restrictions. 

To complete BIO 591 successfiilly, the student must present the 
results of the project in an open seminar. In addition, during or 
immediately after the final semester of course work in the nonthesis 
program, the student must pass a written comprehensive examina- 
tion prepared by the student's advisory committee. Students who 
fail this examination will not receive their degree. 

Genera] Information and Restrictions on Electives 

With the prior consent of his or her advising committee, a thesis 
student may take a m;iximum of six semester hours at the graduate 
level in allied disciplines, and a maximum of six biology semester 
hours at the 4(X) level. A nonthesis student may take a maximum of 
nine semester hours at the graduate level in allied disciplines, and a 
maximum of six biology semester hours at the 400 level. All 400- 
levcl courses must be among those listed as acceptable for graduate 
students in the Graduate Catalog. With the consent of his or her 
advising committee, any student also may transfer in six semester 
hours of graduate-level work from another university. 
BIO 593 may not be counted towards the 30 semester hours 
required for graduation in the thesis option. 
BIO 592, 593, and 610 may not be counted towards the 36 semes- 
ter hours required for graduation in the nonthesis option. 



MASTER OF SCIENCE - NATURAL SCIENCETRACK 
(Nonthesis for In-Service Teachers) 

This program is for those holding a B.S. or B.A. and a teaching cer- 
tificate in a science but may be simultaneously pursuing a second cer- 
tification in science. It is designed to enhance and expand the second- 
ary education teacher's academic preparation in the natural sciences. 
Each student's course of study is individually designed based on 
previous academic and pedagogical experiences and to meet the spe- 
cific demands of the contemporary science educator. 



36 semester hours 
9 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Foundation Courses 

BIO 538, 539, 591 

II. Earth Systems 3 semester hours 
Any biology core or experiential course beyond the required 
semester hour complement. 

Suggested selections: ESS 502, 504, 530, 531, 535, 543, 570 
Students should have completed an introductory geology course as 
a prerequisite for all courses on the list except ESS 570. Students 
who have not taken appropriate preparatory course work could 
demonstrate proficiency by successfial completion of an exam. Prior 
to signing up for earth systems courses, students must obtain the 
approval of the graduate coordinator in Geolog}' and Astronomy. 
Other electives may be selected under guidance of the student's 
adviser and approval of the student's committee. 
in. Biology 9 semester hours 

Group I: Core Content 6 semester hours 

Any 500-Ievel biology courses or 400-level courses that are 
acceptable for graduate students, with the addition of BIO 435- 
438, course topics in biology. Courses indicated as Group II 
courses may not be used to fiilfill Group 1 requirements. 
Group II: Experiential Core 3 semester hours 

BIO 513, 514,515,580 
rV. Electives 15 semester hours 

A maximum of six semester hours may be selected from the earth 
systems category. 

A maximum of three semester hours may be selected from School 
of Education offerings. 

As per University policy, a maximum of only six semester hours of 
400-level courses may be counted toward the degree. 

Additional Requirements 

All students are required to produce a professional portfolio that is 
reflective of the student's performance and completed projects 
throughout the duration of his/her program. The candidate will 
present the professional portfolio to his/her major professor as a 
graduation requirement. The student's major professor will approve 
or disapprove the portfolio. 
A comprehensive exam also is required. 

Committee Composition 

The committee will be formed like that of an M.S. biology nonthe- 
sis committee. 



Since the subject matter of BIO 535, 536, and 537 often changes, a 
graduate student may, with the permission of his or her thesis committee, 
take any of these course topics more than once, provided that they are 
taught as different courses. 



•Jioloijv 



COURSK DKSCRIPTIONS 
BIOLOGY 

Symbol: BIO 

Courses are divided into three groupinp;s: graduate 
only, combined graduate and undergraduate, and 
acceptable undergraduate courses. 
Numbers in parentheses at the end of course 
descriptions indicate the number of hours ot lec- 
ture and lab, respectively. Prerequisite for graduate 
course attendance is admission to the degree pro- 
gram or permission of the graduate coordinator 
and the dean of graduate studies. Prerequisites for 
specific courses are given. 

The following arc the graduate-only courses in 
the biology program: 

5 1 1 Kxpcrinicntal Design and Analysis (3) An 
introduction to the design and analysis ot biologi- 
cal research. An independently conducted research 
project is a required part ot the course. Lab BIL 
511 (2, 1) PREREci Basic statistics. 

513 Research Techniques in the Biological 
Sciences 1 (3) An introduction to the theory and 
application of histological techniques, and light 
and electron microscopy. (0, 3) 

514 Research Techniques in the Biological 
Sciences II (3) Introduces students to the theory 
and practical application of selected techniques in 
biological research, such as radioisotope labeling 
techniques, spectrophotometry, and various chro- 
matographic procedures. (0, 3) 

515 Research Techniques in the Biological 
Sciences III: Computer Applications in 
Biological Research (3) Use of computers in bio- 
logical research and data analysis. Topics include 
image analysis, modeling, and database access for 
proposal or presentation preparation. (0, 3) 

530 Muman Genetics (3) Basic genetic theories as 
they apply to the study of humans; chemical basis of 
inheritance; biochemical variation; cytogenetics; 
somatic cell developmental, behavioral, and popula- 
tion genetics ot man; immunogenetics; quantitative 
inheritance, treatment, and prevention of genetic dis- 
orden;; relationships between viruses, genes, and can- 
cer, social, legal, and psychological aspects of human 
genetics. (3, 0) PRLREQi Introductory' genetics. 

♦ 535 Course Topics in Biology I (3) Lecture/ 
seminar course on the latest topics in ecology, evo- 
lution, or organismal biolog)'. Specific content 
varies depending on faculty involved. Offered in 
rotation with BIO 536 and 537. May be repeated 
for credit if a different topic is presented. (3, 0) 

♦ 536 Course Topics in Biology II (3) Lecture/ 
seminar course on the latest topics in microbiology, 
immunolog)', or molecular genetics. Specific con- 
tent varies depending on faculty involved. Offered 
in rotation with BIO 535 and 537. May be repeat- 
ed for credit if a different topic is presented. (3, 0) 

♦ 537 Course Topics in Biology III (3) 
Lectxire/seminar course on the latest topics in cell 
biology, physiology, or development. Specific con- 
tent varies depending on faculty involved. Offered 
in rotation with BIO 535 and 536. May be repeat- 
ed for credit it a ditferent topic is presented. (3, 0) 
538 Design, Analysis, and Adaptation 
Conceptual Science I (3) The pragmatic appli- 
cation of advanced biological content in second- 
ary science lesson design, implementation, and 
assessment with respect to contemporary science 
education curricular standards. PREREQ; 
Minimum of three, 500-level graduate credits in 
biology, Pennsylvania secondary certification (or 
equivalent) in a science discipline, or permission 
of instructor. 



539 Design, Analysis, and Adaptation of Con- 
ceptual Science II (3) The pragmatic application 
through collaboration of advanced biological con- 
tent in secondary science lesson design, implemen- 
tation, and assessment with respect to contemporary 
science education curricular standards. The empha- 
sis is on thematic, integrated, and interdisciplinary 
unit design. PREREQ^ BIO 538, a minimum of six 
500-level graduate credits in biolog)', Pennsylvania 
secondary certification (or equivalent) in a science 
disciphnc, or permission of instructor. 

591 Directed Research I (3) To be taken when the 
student begins his/her thesis research. Includes a 
comprehensive literature search and development 
of specialized techniques. This course should cul- 
minate in the acceptance ot the thesis proposal by 
an appropriate committee of faculty and is 
required for degree candidacy. 

592 Thesis Research (3) A continuation of thesis 
research. Credit is awarded for this course once all 
experimental work for BIO 610 (thesis) has been 
completed and approved at a meeting of the stu- 
dent's thesis committee proposed and initiated in 
BIO 591. 

593 Directed Research III (3) A continuation of 
the research proposed and initiated in BIO 591. 
To be taken for credit ordy with the approval of 
the graduate coordinator. (Does not count towards 
30 credits required for graduation.) 

610 Thesis (3) Completion of the thesis project. 
Includes presentation at an open seminar, and the 
defense of the thesis as presented to the committee. 
The following courses are combined graduate 
and undergraduate courses. Graduate students 
will be expected to complete additional course 
work beyond that required of undergraduate stu- 
dents, as described in the course syllabus provid- 
ed by the instructor. 

531 Molecular Genetics (3) This course exposes 
graduate students interested in gene manipulation 
to up-to-date information in procarv'otlc and 
eukaryotic genetics. (3, 0) PREREQ^ Introductory 
genetics, one year of organic chemistry. 

564 Microbial Physiology (3) Physiologv' and bio- 
chemical variations are studied in the prokaryotes 
and lower eukaryotes. Lab BIL 564. (3, 3) PRE- 
REQ^ MicTobiology, genetics, and organic chemistry. 

565 Immunology (4) Immunoglobin structure and 
function, nature ot antigens, cell-mediated immunit)', 
hypersensitivity, regulation of immunity, and immu- 
nological diseases. Laboratory experience in immu- 
nological techniques. Lab BIL 565. (3, 3) PREREQ; 
Microbiology, one year of organic chemistry. 

566 Plant Physiology and Biochemistry (3) 
Plant-cell physiolog); including respiration, photo- 
synthesis, enzyme catalysis, auxins, and membrane 
phenomena. Lab BIL 566. (2, 3) PREREQ: 
College botany, organic chemistry'. 

567 Endocrinology (3) An integrative look at the 
physiology of the mammalian endocrine system in 
the regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. 
The pathology associated with hormone imbal- 
ance will be included. (3, 0) PREREQi Cell phys- 
iology and mammalian physiology. 

568 General Animal Physiology (4) General the- 
oretical and appUcd principles of the physiology of 
varipus animal cells, tissues, and organs, with an 
emphasis on homeostasis and mammalian physiol- 
ogy. Lab BIL 568. (3, 3) PREREQ; One year of 
organic chemistr)-, statistics. 

570 Population Biology (3) A quantitative second 
course in ecology', emphasizing distributional pat- 
terns and fluctuations in abundance of natural 



populations. Lab BIL 570. (2, 3) PREREQ: 
General ecology, statistics, calculus. 
571 Wetlands (3) A course designed to provide 
practical experience in wetlands classification, 
delineation, regulation, management, and mitiga- 
tion practices. The abiotic and biotic characteris- 
tics of inland and coastal wetlands are emphasized. 
Lab BIL 571. (2, 3) PREREQ: Eight hours of 
biology or permission of instructor. 

575 Plant Communities (3) A survey of ecological, 
morphological, and physiological strategies of 
plants from seed through adult stages. The integra- 
tion of these strategies to explain the major plant 
communities of North America will be covered. 
Lab BIL 575. (2, 3) PREREQ: General biology. 

576 Limnology (3) The measurement and analysis 
of the physical, chemical, and biological properties 
of freshwater environments, with emphasis on lake 
ecosystems. Lab BIL 576. (2, 3) PREREQ: 
General chemistry-. 

580 Lig^t Microscopy and the Living Cell (3) 
Theory and practical techniques of all types of light 
microscopy and their uses in investigating living cells. 
Also includes techniques such as microinjection, cell 
electrophysiology, and others. Strong emphasis on 
"hands-on" work with equipment. (2, 2) 
584 Epidemiology (3) A general study of the epi- 
demiology of both infectious and environmentally 
related health problems. Methods of interviewing 
and data collecting also are included. (3, 0) PRE- 
REQ; Microbiology. 

The following courses are senior-level under- 
graduate courses that are acceptable for graduate 
students. Graduate students should expect to be 
graded bv the same standards as the undergradu- 
ate students. Selection of these courses must be 
done with the approval of the student's adviser. 
421 Cell and Molecular Biology (4) A lecture and 
laboratory course covering the molecular bases of 
cellular life. Eukar)'otic cell structure and function 
wiU be emphasized. Lab BIL 421. (3, 3) PREREQ; 
Cell physiology, one year of organic chemistry. 
428 Animal Histology (3) Structure and fimction 
of animal tissues and organs. Lab BIL 428. (2, 2) 
PREREQ: Zoology. 

435—438 Course Topics in Biology (1-3) Courses 
in this series are of timely interest to the student. 
Topics may include biological terminolog)', labora- 
tory techniques, mycology, among others. 
448 Animal Development (4) Introduction to 
principles of animal development «ith laboratory 
study of selected vertebrate embry'os. Lab BIL 448. 
(3, 3) PREREQ; Cell physiology, genetics, zoology. 
452 Parasitology (3) Morphology and life cycles 
of the important parasites of man and animals. 
Emphasis is on identification of diagnostic forms 
and understanding of diseases associated with par- 
asites. (3, 0) PREREQ; Zoology, microbiology. 
454 Mycology (3) An introductory course, includ- 
ing a general study of the biology of fungi and a 
survey of the field of medical mycology. (3, 0) 
PREREQ; Microbiology. 

456 Virology (3) Molecular biology- of bacterial, 
plant, and animal viruses; virus classification, iJtra- 
structure, mechanisms ot replication, and effects of 
virus infection on host cells. (2, 3) PREREC^ 
Genetics, microbiology; one year of organic chemistry. 

457 Functional Animal Morphology (3) A 
study of the structure, form, and fiinction of 
morphological adaptations in animals as exam- 
med through a mechanical, ecological, and evo- 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Business 



lutionjry perspective. (3, 0) HREREQ; General 
zoology. 

472 Aquatic Biology (3) An introduction to the 
ecology and identit'ication ot aquatic organisms, 
with emphasis on the biota ot streams and wet- 
lands. Lab BIL 472. (2. i) PREREQ; Botany, 
zoology, gencr;d ecology. 

473 Conservation Biology (3) The application of 
basic biological and ecological principles for the 
preservation of biological diversity. Emphasis will be 



oi\ understanding the threats to biodiversity, the val- 
ues ot biodiversity, and preservation strategies 
including ecological risk assessment and the man- 
agement of endangered species, habitats, and ecosys- 
tems. PREREQi Botany or zoology and ecology. 
474 Microbial Ecology (4) Theory and application 
of modem microbial ecology. Lectures vrd] focus 
on topics such as microbial communities, interac- 
tions with other organisms, biogeochemistry, and 
biotechnology. Lab BIL 474. (3, 3) PREREQ: 



.\licn)bioli)g\, ecology, general chcinutrv. 
485 Systematic Botany (3) Principles of taxonomy 
and biosystematics. Selected plant families from 
tropical and temperate zones. Each student devel- 
ops a proficiency in the use of modem flora and 
knowledge ot the common species of the spring 
flora of Chester County. Lab BIL 485. (2. 3) 
PREREQ: Botany. 



Master of Business Administration Program 



Graduate Business Center 
1160 McDermott Drive 
West Chester Universit)' 
West Chester, PA 19383 
610-436-2608 
Fax: 610-436-2439 
E-mail: mba@wcupa.edu 
Dr. Christ, M.B^. Director 

Program of Study 

West Chester University offers an M.B.A. program which is 

• designed for professional growth and career advancement, 

• muitidisciplinar)', 

• relevant for today's changing business climate, and 

• innovative, convenient, and an exceptional educational value. 

The departments of Accounting, Economics/Finance, Management, 

and Marketing jointly offer a program leading to the master of 

business administration (M.B.A.) with areas of concentration in 

economics/finance, general business, management, and technology 

and electronic commerce. 

All courses meet at the off-campus Graduate Business Center. 

Requirements and courses vary by concentration. Students have fiiU 

access to all University resources. 

The University's M.B.A. program seeks motivated individuals wdth 

diverse backgrounds who have demonstrated quality performance as 

an undergraduate. 

Cohort M.B.A. 

The cohort M.B.A. is designed for experienced professionals and mid- to 
upper-level managers who seek to pursue their degree within an execu- 
tive-style learning format. The cohort M.B.A. is an accelerated learning 
approach that allows qualified students to cam their degree in as little as 
20 months while continuing to work tlill time. To be eligible for the 
cohort M.B.A., students must have satisfied most or all of their founda- 
tion-level course requirements (grade of B or betcr if taken at the gradu- 
ate level) and must possess a minimum of five years' work experience. 

Evening 

The evening M.B.A. program is designed for a wide range of par- 
ticipants who share a desire for professional growth and career 
advancement. Students have diverse backgrounds representing a 
wide variety ol baccalaureate degrees, work experiences, and career 
goals. Students can choose concentrations in economics/finance, 
management, or an individualized course of study. 

Technology M.B.A. 

The tcchnolog)' and electronic commerce M.B.A. (TEC M.B.A.) is 
designed for technical and nontechnical managers and other who seek 
a level of awareness, knowledge, and strategic understanding of the 



technologies and technological issues that are necessary to compete 
and succeed in today's complex and quickly changing economy. 

Off-Campus M.B.A. Programs 

This program is tailored to various corporate locations and time 
commitments. 

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
PROGRAM 

Recommended courses for all programs are as follows. (See course 
tides and descriptions under Accounting, Economics and Finance, 
Management, and Marketing.) 

Curriculum 33-51 semester hours 

I. Foundation Courses (maximum 18 semester hours) 
Prerequisites are not applied to degree credit. 

M.B^. students are assumed to have a working knowledge of algebra. 
ACC 500, ECO 500 and 501, HN 500, MOT 504. and MKT 501 
M.B.A. candidates may have satisfied these required courses if 
they received a C or better in an undergraduate equivalent as well 
as their undergraduate degree in the six years prior to acceptance. 
Before M.B.A. acceptance, applicants may take comparable under- 
graduate courses to meet the foundation requirements at any 
accredited two-year or four-year college. 

Once accepted into West Chester University's M.B.A. program, 
students must take foundation courses at the graduate level either 
at West Chester University or another approved institution. 
Departments will offer waiver exams for foundation courses upon 
request. Applicants taking a waiver exam must earn a C grade or 
better to receive exemption from a foundation course. 

II. Core Courses 24 semester hours 
ACC 501; FIN 501; MOT 511, 514, 560, 599; 

MKT 505; and TEC 501 OR MIS 501 
(Students choosing the technology and electronic 
commerce concentration must take TEC 501 
within the M.B.A. core.) 
III. Concentration Courses 

A. Economics/Finance 9 semester hours 
ECO 547 and FIN 544 

One economics/finance elective* 

B. Management 9 semester hours 
MGT 531 and 552 

One management elective* 

C. General Business (Individualized) 9 semester hours 
Required: 

Three M.B.A. elective courses' 
E. Technology' and Electronic Commerce 9 semester hours 

TEC 502 and 505 
One technology and electronic commerce elective* 



Requires prior written consent of the M.B.A. director. 



Business; Ki.onomics and Finance 



Admission Requirements 

Admission decisions are based on a number of factors, including aca- 
demic records, professional performance, and for cohort-based pro- 
grams, a personal inter\'iew. In addition to meeting the general 
requirements for admission to a graduate program at West Chester 
Univcrsit\', each applicant must submit an essay on career plans, a cur- 
rent resume, and three letters of recommendation. Test scores from the 
Graduate Management Admission Test also are required unless a 
waiver is obtained from the M.BA. director. Applicants to the cohort- 
based programs also arc rctiuired to attend an information session and 
have a personal interview with the M.B.A. director. An applicant with 
academic deficiencies may be granted provisional status if the applicant 
has a demonstrated record of significant work experiences. 
InternationiJ students also must obtain a minimum of 550 on the 
Test of English as a Foreign Language and, upon acceptance and 



arrival on campus, be interviewed by a representative of the English 
as a Second Language program for a review of their English-speaking 
skills. For those requiring additional study, a remedial program will be 
recommended and required as part of their initial M.B.A. studies. 

Degree Candidacy 

For degree candidacy approval, students must maintain a minimum 
cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 in all M.B.A. courses 
and a 3.0 GPA in concentration courses, be fiilly matriculated, and 
have completed all foundation courses. 

Graduation Requirement 

Students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in all 
M.B.A. courses and a 3.0 GPA in concentration courses. 



Accounting 



Mr. Galbraith, Chairperson (610-436-2236) 

PROFESSOR 

Ali Naggar, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Randall E. LaSaUe, C.RA., Ph.D., Drexel University 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Kevin E. Flynn, C.P.A., M.S., Drexel University 
Clyde J. Galbraith, M.B.A., Drexel University 
Peter Oehlers, C.P.A., D.B.A., Louisiana Tech University 
Beatrice Rolland, C.P.A., D.^ A., Argosy University 
Carl M. Smith, M.B.A., Temple University 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ACCOUNTING 

Symbol: ACC 

500 Financial Reporting and Analysis (3) A 

study of financial recording for describing tfie 
fiduciary status of an organization, including the 
reporting of assets, liabilities, stockholders' equity. 



revenues, and expenses. Tfie course also includes 
analysis of financial information as the basis for 
management decisions. This course is designed for 
students admitted to the M.B.A. program without 
recent course work in accounting and is equivalent 
to two undergraduate courses. 
501 Strategic Cost Management (3) Cost man- 
agement across the supply chain is integrated with 



strategic analysis to understand the role of financial 
and nonfinancial information in operational and 
strategic decision making. Topics include value- 
chain analysis, cost-driver analysis, activit)'-based 
management, line of business evaluation, technolo- 
gy costing, qualit>' cost management, and the bal- 
anced scorecard. The importance of ethical conduct 
also is covered. PREREQi ACC 500 or equivalent. 



Economics and Finance 

Dr. Benzing, Chairperson (610-738-0433) 

PROFESSORS 

Cynthia D. Benzing, Ph.D., Drexel University 
Philip DeMoss, Ph.D., Kansas State University 
Tahany Naggar, Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Roger E. Bove, Ph.D., Harvard University 

Daniel Mohan, Ph.D., Rutgers - The State University 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Thomas P. Andrews, Ph.D., Temple University 

Sheree Buchenroth, Ph.D., Indiana University 

Kevin Dunleavy, Ph.D., Duke University 

Orhan Kara, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee 

Jongdoo Lee, Ph.D., George Washington University 

Huimin Li, Ph.D., Drexel University 

Denis Raihall, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Roberta Schini, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, The Wharton School 

Thomas W. Tolin, Ph.D., University of Houston 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ECONOMICS 

Symbol: ECO 

500 Data Analysis for Decision Making (3) Tlus 
course covers the basic concepts of business statis- 
tics, data analysis, and management science in a 
spreadsheet environment. Topics include probabili- 
ty distributions, hjpothesis testing, regression, fore- 
casting, simulation, and optimization. This course 
gives students hands-on experience in analyzing 
data for practical decision making. It is designed 
for students admitted to the M.B.A. program 
without recent course work in business statistics 



and is equi\'alent to two undergraduate courses. 
501 Business and the Economic Environment (3) 

This course covers macroeconomic and microeco- 
nomic principles by discussing their applications to 
modern business problems. It discusses firm supply 
and demand, cost and pricing, market structure 
and competition, monctar)' and fiscal policy, and 
aggregate demand and supply. This course is 
designed for students admitted to the M.B.A. pro- 
gram without recent course work in economics and 
is cquiv-alent to two undergraduate courses. 
510 Applied Econometrics (3) Analysis of multi- 
\'ariate models, determination of trends, oscillation. 



and periodic movements. Topics include remedies 
for auto-correlation and multicollinearit)'; dummy 
variables; distributed lags, forecasting and simula- 
tion; and alternative estimation techniques, such as 
two-stage least squares, three-stage least squares, and 
maximum likelihood estimators. PREREQ^ ECO 
500 and ECO 501 , or undergraduate equivalents. 
511 International Trade and Finance (3) This 
course is designed to e-xpose students to the inter- 
national business emironment and enable them to 
increase their business presence abroad whether it is 
in manufacturing, finance, or other services. Topics 
include diversity and cultural differences, foreign 
exchange markets and exchange rate determination. 



Business: Management 



cxport/imfK»rt ■.t^atcglc^, lorcign direct invc>lnicni, 
and multinational accountini; and financing. PRE- 
REQ: ACC 501 and HN 501. 
525 Contemporary Monetary Theory and 
Financial Institutions (3) This course enhances 
the student's capabilin,' to analj^e the interrela- 
tionships between aggregate economic activity, 
fmancial markets, and central banking instru- 
ments, objectives, and policT. Topics relate to 
demand for financial assets.' PREREQ: ECO 501. 
530 Economics and Public Policy (3) The princi- 
ples and methods ot economic anal\'sis are used to 
cv-aluate the American economic system. Inflation, 
recession, and economic growth; problems of public 
finance and ta.xation; public policy regarding the con- 
centration ot economic power. PREREQ^ ECO 501. 
547 Managerial Economics (3) Developrnent and 
application ot a set of advanced micro-macro eco- 
nomic concepts to serve both as a source of theo- 
retical structure and unification of other business 
sciences. Emphasis will be given to topics such as 
risk analysis, linear programming, and capital 
budgeting. PREREQ: ECO 500 and ECO 501. 



♦ 590 Special Topics (3) .X seminar or independent 
study course on selected economic topics. Includes a 
research paper or project which treats a contempo- 
rary- economic issue ftom an interdisciplinary, poli- 
c)-'lcvel perspective. PREREQ: ECO 500, ECO 
501, and written permission of program director. 

FINANCE 

Symbol: FIN 

500 Principles of Corporate Finance (3) This 
course covers the basic principles underlying all 
fmancial decision making. The time value of 
money principle is applied to stock valuation, 
bond valuation, and capital budgeting. The course 
also discusses the capital asset pricing model, mar- 
ket efficiency, capital procurement, short-term 
capital management, and financial leveraging. It is 
designed for students admitted to the M.B.A. pro- 
gram without recent course work in finance and is 
equivalent to one undergraduate course. PRE- 
REQ: ACC 500 and ECO 501. 

501 Financial Management (3) Theory and prac- 
tice ot managerial finance, with emphasis on 



analysis and understanding ul the liiuiicial conse- 
quences of managerial decisions. Topics include 
financial statements, capital budgeting, working 
capital, and special contemporary concerns, such 
as small business finance. Required core course. 
PRi':REQ: ECO 500 and FIN 500. 
544 Investment Analysis and Portfolio 
.Management (3) Introduction to investments, 
including examination ot why and how individuals 
invest. This course provides an overview of the 
process by which an indi\'idual seeks out and syn- 
thesizes information about investment opportunities 
in order to make decisions to add to, maintain, or 
delete assets fiom an investment portfolio. Special 
attenfion is directed to the risk and return ot assets. 
PREREQ: nN 501. 

♦ 590 Special Topics (3) A seminar or independ- 
ent study course on a selected finance topic. 
Course includes a research paper or a project that 
applies fmancial knowledge to a real world prob- 
lem. PREREQ;^ FIN 501 and written permission 
of course director. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Management 

Dr. McGee, Chairperson (610-436-2363) 

PROFESSORS 

Hung M. Chu, Ph.D., Louisiana State University 
Roberta Snow, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Wesley W. Thomas, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Gerard Callanan, Ph.D., Drexel University 



Evan Leach, Ph.D., Yale University 

Charles H. McGec, Ph.D., Northwestern University 

Rani G. Selvanathan, Ph.D., University of Delhi, University of Paris 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

David Perri, M.A., Pennsylvania State University 
Ralph Rodriguez, Ph.D., Temple University 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MANAGEMENT 

Symbol: MGT 

504 Operations Management (3) This course 
uses various interactive learning methodologies to 
create and promote awareness of the critical oper- 
ations management application to both service and 
manufacturing companies. Through the case 
approach st\idcnts will learn how an operation 
strategy that is both cross-functional and global 
influences competitiveness. Topics covered include 
project management, product design, and process 
analysis, supply chain management, electronic 
commerce, and enterprise resource planning sys- 
tems. PREREQ^ ECO 500 or written permission 
of the program director 

511 Managing and Leading Organizations (3) 
An examination ot management functions and 
managerial processes trom a systems perspective. 
This course traces the development of man- 
agement and organization principles and theories, 
with emphasis on analyzing managerial problems 
and opportunities in both private and public sec- 
tors. The course explores the relationship between 
the individual and the organization, and topics 
such as leadership, communications, motivation, 
and decision making. 

513 Business and Society (3) The context and 
environment in which business organizations 
operate with specific attention to the social, ethi- 
cal, political, and legal dimensions of an organiza- 
tion's external environment. Value assumptions. 



means-ends relationships, and policy ramifications 
of the constraints and opportunities inherent in 
the environment will be examined in depth. A 
managerial perspective will be developed to build a 
framework for macro-level tradc-otfs among and 
between competing economic, social, ethical, 
political, and legal forces and goals. 
514 Environments of Business (3) This course 
provides an overview ot how major trends in the 
world economy, social Issues, and political systems 
affect business. Students will enhance their ability 
to understand the implications ot major social, 
economic, and political trends in the U.S. and the 
world; critically examine their own position and 
analyze popular writings on these issues; and 
appreciate the perspective of others whose circum- 
stances differ from theirs. 
521 Organizational Development (3) Inter- 
pcrsf)nal relations. Intra- and intergroup relations, 
and the leadership role and fiinction in the man- 
agement of organizational development, change, 
conflict, and productivity. Primary focus will be on 
organizational development as an Intervention 
strategy aimed at changing and Improving organi- 
zational climate and performance. Organizations 
will be viewed as soclotcchnical systems interact- 
ing with both internal and environmental ftjrces. 
PRKRE(iMGT5n. 

531 Human Resources Management (3) The 
managerial implications of the human resources 
management and personnel administration func- 
tions. Topics Include forecasting and planning of 
staffing requirements, recruitment, selection, allo- 



cation, evaluation, and development of the human 
resources ot an organization. Lectures, class dis- 
cussions, and case materials will be used. 
552 Managing an Enterprise (3) This course 
attempts to provide students with some knowl- 
edge, tools, and methods neccssar)' for planning, 
establishing, expanding, and operating an enter- 
prise. Theories and techniques learned in this class 
and pre^ous courses In the business curriculum 
will be used to develop an Individual, comprehen- 
sive project, and it will be treated as the primary 
mode of learning. Depending on experiences and 
individual background, students may require elec- 
tronic communication and outside classroom 
interactions in addition to regular classroom meet- 
ings. PREREQ: ACC 501, FIN 501, MKT 501, 
and TEC 501 or MIS 501. 

560 Managerial Communications and 
Negotiations (3) This course provides an ovcn-iew 
of managerial communication and ncgotiarion in 
organizations. This course will use a multidlscipli- 
nar)' approach to the field utilizing relevant material 
from psychology, sociology, economics, and political 
science to address the parctice of communication 
and negotiation in organizational settings. This 
course will examine cognitive socl;J, behavioral, and 
political factors that affect managers' ability to com- 
municate and provide a framework to enhance stu- 
dents' ability to communicate and negotiate more 
effectively in organizational settings. 

561 Globalization and Management (3) 
Examination of the problems of management, 
marketing, and finance when developing and 



Businc■^s: Marketinj; 



engaging in nucrnutiunol but>incsb. Attention to 
the formulation ot ;iltcrnative strategies for devel- 
oping international business enterprises, the 
impact and conseijuences ot implementing various 
alternative strategies for traditional business func- 
tions, problems of the multinational firm, and the 
special challenges ot doing business with or in 
underdeveloped countries. PREREQiMGT 514 
andMKT SOI. 

♦ 587 Special Topics in Management (3) A sem- 
inar or independent study course providing expo- 
sure to current literature and discourse on selected 



issues in management. PREREQ^ Written permis- 
sion of program director. 

599 Strategic Management (3) An in-deplh exam- 
ination ot the processes by which business strategies 
are conceived, formulated, cxcc-uted, and changed. 
Specific topics include strategic planning, endoge- 
nous and exogenous influences affecting strategic 
feasibility, analyses, and choices. Comprehensive 
strategy-oriented cases from a variety of business 
contexts are used. Should be taken in student's final 
semester. Required core course. PREREQ^ 
Completion of all other M.B.A. core courses. 



MANAGEMENT INFORMATION 
SYSTEMS 

Symbol: MIS 

501 Business Information Systems (3) A blend- 
ing of theor)-, case studies, and personal computer 
applications to the solution of business informa- 
tion problems. Students will gain insight into 
fijnctional and strategic implications of informa- 
tion resources, technology, and systems. 

♦ This course may he taken again for credit. 



Marketing 



Dr. Rcdington, Chairperson (610-436-2259) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Paul Arsenault, Ph.D., Temple University 
Paul E Christ, Ph.D., Drexel University 
John E. Gault, Ph.D., Drexel University 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
LAW 

Symbol: BLA 

501 Legal Environment of Business (3) An in- 
depth examination of legal issues for business 
organizations, including constraints and opportu- 
nities. Primary attention will be given to an inten- 
sive exploration of the law as it affects business 
contracts, sales, commercial paper, and the forma- 
tion and operation of a business entity from the 
perspective of the manager. This course is 
designed to meet the professional needs of man- 
agers who have minimal exposure to the law and 
to enhance their knowledge of the legal ramifica- 
tions of business operations. 

MARKETING 

Symbol: MKT 

500 Principlesof Marketing (3) An introduction 
to marketing. Selection of target markets, develop- 
ing marketing mixes, decision making, planning, 
implementation, and monitoring of marketing 
programs. Intended for students with no previous 
course work in marketing. 

501 Marketing Management (3) An anal)tical 
approach to the study of marketing, focusing on 
the total environment in which marketing deci- 
sions are made. Emphasis is on planning the mar- 
keting effort and integrating it into the total oper- 
ation of an organization; i.e., managing the mar- 
keting function. This course is designed for stu- 
dents admitted to the M.B.A. program without 
recent course work in marketing and is equivalent 
to one undergraduate course. PREREQl ACC 
500, ECO 500, and ECO 501. 

505 Marketing Strategy and Customer Value (3) 
This course examines the strategic issues facing 
organizations as they strive to satisfy' customer 
needs and create customer value. Additional 
emphasis is placed on identifying and explaining 
technology's contribution to this process. Coverage 
includes the processes and strategies for develop- 
ing and maintaining customer \'alue, techniques 
and technologies used to gather and anal^■ze mar- 
ket information, inno\'ative approaches to manag- 
ing customer relationships, and other contempo- 
rary issues affecting today's marketing decision 



Michelle Patrick, Ph.D., Kent State University 

John T. Redington, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Sandra M.Tomkowicz, J.D., University of Pennsylvania 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Jason Phillips, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 



makers. Topics are investigated using a number of 
methods including case study, analytical and 
hands-on exercises, and real-world discussion. 
PREREQ: MGT 500 and MKT 501. 
♦ 590 Special Topics in Marketing (3) A seminar or 
independent study course on selected marketing top- 
ics. Includes research papers or project, which exam- 
ines one or more contemporary marketing issues not 
available in the existiing curriculum. PREREQl 
MKT 501 and permission of program director. 

TECHNOLOGY AND ELECTRONIC 
COMMERCE 

Symbol: TEC 

501 Technology and E-Business (3) This course 

introduces students to the basics of technology and 
how it impacts today's business environment. The 
course offers a fum foundation for understanding 
what technology means to the economy, the com- 
pany, and the people within the company by merg- 
ing classroom discussions of current issues, theories, 
and trends. Different technologies are explored, 
with a focus on information technologies important 
for establishing an electronic business environment. 

502 Technology, Innovation, and the Organiza- 
tion (3) Tliis course is designed to help students in 
both technology-based and nontechnology-based 
organizations understand how technology can 
affect the company. The core concept delineated 
here is that technology, and the closely related idea 
of innovation, can be organized into a managed, 
multidisciplinary process. All members of the 
organization, including technical, administrative, 
marketing, operations, and financial, must under- 
stand this process. Technology's impact on all func- 
tional areas is discussed. PREREQ: MGT 511. 

503 Marketing and Technology (3) This course 
focuses on identifying and explaining new tech- 
nologies and how they fit within the competitive 
strategy of the organization. Where possible, a 
hands-on approach will be used to better acquaint 
students with technology. Additional emphasis is 
placed on discussing the role the Internet now 
serves for marketers and that marketing high- 
technology product and services is often viewed as 
different from marketing other types of products 
and services. PREREQ^TEC 501 or MIS 501, 



and MKT 501. 

SOS Value Chain and Business Processes (3) This 
course focuses on technology's role in the creation 
and maintenance of an organization's value chain - 
the entries and activities that create and deliver 
value to customers - and examines necessary busi- 
ness processes. It shows how an organization's 
value chain makes it possible to change the way 
organizations conduct business, including how it 
manufactures, markets, transacts, and manages its 
product and service; communicates with and man- 
ages its employees; and deals with its stakeholders. 
The course will strive for balance bervvecn techni- 
cal knowledge and strategic understanding. PRE- 
REQ: TEC 501 or MIS 501. 
510 Issues in Technology and Business (3) This 
course provides a forum to examine current issues 
not covered in other courses. Since the scope of 
material may be vvide, this course is offered on an 
open-ended basis, and its format may vary depend- 
ing on its course content. For example, one course 
may use a seminar format while another may use a 
computer laboratorj-based format, allowing for flex- 
ibility in covering the dvTiamic nature of technologi- 
cal change. PREREQiTEC 501 or .\US 501. 

♦ 590 Special Topics in Technology and Elec- 
tronic Commerce (3) A seminar or independent 
study course on selected TEC topics. Includes 
research paper or project, which examines a con- 
temporary TEC issue not available in the existing 
curriculum. PREREQ; Written permission of pro- 
gram director 

600 Technology and Business Planning /Vnalysis 

(3) This capstone course is divided into two major 
learning areas: the first draws on the student's pre- 
vious course work by integrating both functional 
and specialty courses to show how each is related, 
primarily through casework. The second area 
requires students to take the integrated knowledge 
and apply it to a real world business or strategic 
plan specifically from a general or upper manage- 
ment perspective for a technology-based company 
or a company facing important decisions in which 
technology will play an important role. PREREQ^ 
Fmal semester Completion of all core courses and 
TEC 501, 502, and 505. 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Chemistrv 



Chemistry 



Room 119 Schmucker Science Center II 

West Chester Universit}' 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2631 

Dr. Falcone, Chairperson 

Dr. Ahmad, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSOR 

Michael Moran, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Naseer Ahmad, Ph.D., D.ScAligarh Muslim University 

Roger Barth, ?\\X)., Johns Hopkins University 

Melissa Betz Cichowicz, Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Blaise Frost, Ph.D., University of South Dakota 

Felix Goodson, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Helen G. Reid, Ph.D., University of New Orleans 

Joel Ressner, Ph.D., Lehigh University 

John Townsend, Ph.D., Cornell University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Mahrukh Azam, Ph.D., Seton Hall University 
Albert Caffo, Ph.D., Ohio State University 
James Falcone, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Timothy Starn, Ph.D., Indiana University 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the mas- 
ter of science in chemistr)', master of science in clinical chemistry, 
and a program for professional growth. Until further notice, no 
new students will be admitted into these programs. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
graduate degree program at West Chester, applicants must present 
an undergraduate background that includes mathematics through 
calculus, one semester of anal)tical chemistr)', and full-year courses 
in organic chemistry and physical chemistry. 

Degree Requirements 

1. Before admission to degree candidacy, each student is required to 
pass three qualifying examinations in the five major areas of 
chemistry (inorganic, analytical, physical, organic, and biochem- 
istry). The student may select up to four areas. If necessary, the 
examinations in each area may be retaken once. The student may 
be required to enroll in appropriate undergraduate courses for no 
credit in order to prepare for a re-examination. These examina- 
tions must be passed before admission to degree candidacy, i.e., 
prior to the attainment of 15 graduate credits. 

2. At the discretion of the department chairperson. Graduate Record 
Examination scores may be required for purposes of evaluation 
and guidance. 

3. Reading proficiency is required in any one of the following mod- 
ern languages: German, French, or Russian. The reading test is 
administered by the Department of Foreign Languages. In place 
of the modern-language proficiency, a demonstrated proficiency 
in a computer language may be substituted.* 

4. The candidate must perform successfiilly on an oral examination, 
which is required for Options A, B, and C listed below. The oral 
examination will include general chemistry knowledge but will 
place emphasis on the area represented by independent study or 
the research report. The members of the examination committee 
include the research supervisor, the departmental graduate coor- 
dinator, and two other professors. 



Curriculum for the Master of Science in Chemistry 

The M.S. in chemistry program consists ot a required core of 15 
semester hours and a chemistry elective area for which there are three 
options. (See the description of each option for the total semester 
hours required.) All students must complete the core, composed of 
CHE 511, 531, 540, or 543, and any two of the topics courses (CHE 
515, 525, 533, 544, or 575). One semester of CHE 591 must be taken. 

Option A (30 semester hours) 

This is the thesis program. Beyond the core, the candidate takes 
thesis (CHE 610) for three credits, research in chemistry (CHE 
580) for three credits, and seven semester hours of electives. 

Option B (33 semester hours) 

Beyond the core, this option requires research in chemistry (CHE 
580) for six credits and 10 semester hours of electives. 

Option C (36 semester hours) 

Under this plan, the student completes core requirements and an 
elective area of 19 semester hours that must include three credits in 
research in chemistry (CHE 580). 

Under all options, the elective area is developed under advisement 
from chemistr)' offerings but may include three semester hours from 
another science area or mathematics.* Until admitted to degree can- 
didacy, students may not undertake research (CHI"' 580). 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CLINICAL CHEMISTRY 

Admission Requirements 

An applicant must meet the general requirements for a degree pro- 
gram at West Chester University and must hold a bachelor's degree 
in chemistry, medical technology, or a closely related field. 
Course prerequisites for admission include one semester each of 
analytical chemistry, biochemistry, physics, clinical chemistry, clini- 
cal chemistry laboratory, and physical chemistr)'. Two semesters of 
organic chemistry and mathematics through calculus also are 
required. Several of the above courses may be waived if the appli- 
cant has graduated from a four-year nationally certified medical 
technology program. Students who do not meet program prerequi- 
sites may take required courses upon enrollment. Graduate Record 
Examination scores may be required prior to acceptance. 

Degree Requirements 

1. Before admission to candidacy, each student must pass a com- 
prehensive examination covering the areas of biochemistr)', clini- 
cal chemistry, and analytical chemistry. This examination is usu- 
ally administered after one-half of the student's course work is 
completed. If necessary, this examination may be retaken once. 

2. The candidate must perform successfully on an oral exiunination, 
which is required for all program options. TTie oral examination will 
include general chemistr)' knowledge but will place emphasis on the 
area represented by independent study or the research report. The 
members of the examination committee include the research supervi- 
sor, the dcparmientd graduate coordinator, and xwo other professors. 

Curriculum for the Master of Science in Clinical Chemistry 

The program consists of a required core of 20 semester hours. Addi- 
tional credits needed for the degree may be pursued under three 
options. 

Core courses: ADM 505, CHE 524, 548, 555, 579, 582, 591 (CHE 
550, clinical chemistry internship, is also required of students who 
lack previous clinical laboratory training.) 



* A computer science ccnirse taken to satisfy the foreign language requirement 
will not be counted as an elective toward the degree. 



Chemistry 



Option A (36 semester hours) 

Core, plus CI IK 580 (research in chemistry), plus 13 semester hours 
of electivcs from chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, computer 
science, or administration. 

Option B (30 semester hours) 

Core, plus four semester hours of electives, plus three credits of thesis 
(CHE 610) and three credits of research in chemistry (CHE 580). 



Option C — Master of Science in Clinical Chemistry and 
Certificate in Administration (38 semester hours) 

Chemistry core, plus CHE 580, plus the certificate in administra- 
tion core requirements. The student receives both the M.S. clinical 
chemistry degree and the certificate in administration. 

* A computer science course taken to satisfy the foreign language requirement 
will not be counted as an elective toward the degree. 



COURSE DKSCRIPTIONS 
CHEMISTRY 

Symbol: CI IE unless otherwfise shown. CRL 
indicates laboratory'. 

500 Fundamentals of Radioisotope Techniques 

(3) Biologic;iI, cheniiciU, environmental, and physi- 
cal effects of nuclear radiation. Radiation detection 
instrumentation and radio tracer methodology. 
503 Chemistry of the Environment (3) The 
chemistr)' ot the atmosphere, hydrosphere, and 
biosphere; man's impact on these areas. (Not for 
M.S. in chemistry.) 

♦ 505 Fundamental Topics in Chemistry (2-6) 
Basic level elective courses in chemistry tor protes- 
sional growth. (Not for M.S. in chemistry.) PRE- 
REQ; General chemistn,-. 

509 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry (3) The 
emphasis of this course is on periodic properties of 
the representative elements, the structure of inor- 
ganic solids, the chemistr)' of aqueous and non- 
aqueous solutions, and the study of some transi- 
tion metals. Lathanides and actinides also are 
studied. (Not for M.S. in chemistry.) PREREQi 
CHE 103/104. 

511 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I (3) 

Structure and properties ot the elements and their 
compounds from a theoreticiU point of view; the 
periodic law, acids and bases, structure and reactiv- 
ity of metal compounds and main group com- 
pounds. PREREQ: CHE 341. 

♦ 515 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3) Topics 
of current interest in inorganic chemistry. Topic to 
be announced prior to registration. 

517 History of Chemistry (1) The histor)' of 
chcmistrj' and its predecessors from ancient times 
to the present. 

518 Literature of Chemistry (1) Instruction in 
the use of a modern chemical library, reference 
and data acquisition, synthetic procedures, and 
computer data bases. PREREQ: CHE 231. 

519 Ethics and Human Values in Science (1) A 
one-semester course for science majors to acquaint 
students with potential ethical problems in their 
professional careers. 

524 Analytical Chemistry II (3) Basic principles 
ot applied instrumental analysis. Special emphasis 
on the use ot spectrophotometric, electroanalytical, 
and chromatographic instrumentation. PREREQ^ 
CHE 321 and CHE 341. 
CRL 524 Analytical Chemistry II Laboratory 
(2) Practical experience in the choice and applica- 
tion ot instnimcntal methods to chemical systems. 
CONCURRENT or PREREQ: CHE 524. 

♦ 525 Topics in Analytical Chemistry (3) In- 
depth examination of current topics in instrumen- 
tal or wet chemical analysis. Special emphasis on 
state-ot-thc-art development and applications. 



Topic announced prior to registration. 
531 Organic Reaction Mechanisms (3) Theo- 
retical treatment of selected organic reactions. 
Emphasis on bonding theory, stmctural relation- 
ship, equilibria, and tree-energy relationships. 

♦ 533 Topics in Organic Chemistry (3) Topics 
of current interest in organic chemistry. Topic an- 
nounced prior to registration. 

536 Polymer Chemistry (3) Polymerization 
kinetics, theology of polymer melts, crystallization 
parameters, and monomer reactivity in copolvmer- 
ization. 

CRL 536 Polymer Chemistry Laboratory (2) A 
course designed to introduce the advanced student 
to the synthesis of polymers and the study of the 
molecular, physical, and thermal properties of 
these compounds. PREREQ: CHE 232/CRL 
232. COREQ:CHE536. 
540 Chemical Thermodynamics (3) Laws and 
functions ot thermod\'namics and their applica- 
tions: introduction to statistical thermodynamics. 
543 Quantum Chemistry (3) Basic quantum 
chemistry, including the hydrogen atom problem, 
chemical bonding, spectroscopic concepts, and 
group theory. 

♦ 544 Topics in Physical Chemistry (3) Topics 
of current interest in physical chemistry. Topic 
announced prior to registration. 

548 Clinical Biochemistry (3) A one-semester 
course on the biochemical basis of disease. Case 
histories are discussed with emphasis on the clini- 
cal interpretation of laboratory data. PREREQ^ 
CHE 581. 

550 Internship in Chemistry (3-6) A full- or part- 
time work/study appointment in a hospital, com- 
mercial, governmental, or industrial laboratory 
supervised joindv by an on-site supervisor and a 
chemistry department faculty member. PREREQ^ 
Permission of the department internship committee. 
555 Quantitative Clinical Methods (3) A course 
on the mathematical aspects of clinical laboratory 
science. Statistics and laboratory uses for comput- 
ers are stressed. PREREQ. CHE 581. 

560 Advanced Organic Spectroscopy (3) An ad- 
vanced course in organic spectroscopy dealing with 
IR, NMR, and MS techniques. PREREQ: CHE 
531. 

571 Fundamentals of Biochemistry (3) Structure 
and chemistry ot proteins and nucleic acids; mo- 
lecular biology, physio-chemical methods for bio- 
macromolccules, enzj'mes, and the molecular basis 
for some physiological phenomena. Lab: CRL 
571. PREREQ: Physical chemistry. 
CRL 571 Experimental Biochetnistry (2) Labo- 
ratorA- exercises in the ftindamentals of biochem- 
istry.CONCURRENT or PREREQ: CHE 571. 
CRL 572 Experimental Biochemistry II (2) A 
second-semester laborator)- course in biochemistry 



that stresses the use of advanced analytical instru- 
ments to characterize biologically important mole- 
cules and to eludicate their mechanism of action. 

575 Topics in Biochemistry (3) Topics of current 
interest in biochemistry. Topic announced prior to 
registration. 

576 Biochemistry I (3) A two-semester course in 
biochemistry. The first part shows how the chem- 
istry of amino acids, proteins, enzymes, carbohy- 
drates, lipids, and membranes enables living or- 
ganisms to perform biological functions. PRE- 
REQ^CHE 232 and physical chemistry. 

577 Biochemistry II (3) The second part of bio- 
chemistry covers the biosynthesis of diverse mole- 
cules, DNA structure and function, and molecular 
physiology, including immunoglobulins, hor- 
mones, nutrition, and nerve action. Chemistry will 
be related to normal and pathological biological 
functions. PREREQ: CHE 576. 

579 Chemical Toxicology (3) A one-semester 
course in the basic principles of toxicological analy- 
sis. Special emphasis will be placed on documenta- 
tion, sampling, and verification of laboratory mate- 
rials and results. The ennronmental and physiologi- 
cal aspects of chemical toxicitj' will be explored. 
CRL 579 Chemical Toxicology Laboratory (2) 
A one-semester course in the basic principles of 
toxicological analysis. CONCURRENT or PRE- 
RE(iCHE579.' 

♦ 580 Research in Chemistry (3-6) Independent 
research in chemistry, under the direction of a 
member of the chemistry faculty. 

581 Clinical Chemistry (3) Analysis of biological 
fluids. Clinical significance of enzyme, electrolyte, 
protein, carbohydrate, and hormone analysis. Re- 
quires permission of instructor or undergraduate 
preparation in organic chemistry and quantitative 
analysis. CONCURRENT or PREREQ: CHE 
571; PREREQ: CHE .321. 

582 Advanced Clinical Chemistry (3) .'\ one- 
semester course with emphasis on new clinical 
tests, instrumentation, and methodologies in clini- 
cal chemistr)'. PREREQ: CHE 571 and 581. 

583 Clinical Chemistry Seminar (2) A course 
emphasizing the recent literature in clinical chem- 
istry. Student lecture presentations and round table 
discussions are used. PREREQ: CHE 581. 

591 Seminar (2) Topics of current interest in 

chemistr)-. 

•610 Thesis (3) 

sec 570 Science and Human Values (3) Not 

for M.S. in chemistry. 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 

♦ Graduate students beginning their research pro- 
gram should enroll in CHE 580, which may be 
repeated. Students should enroll in CHE 610 dur- 
ing their last semester. Only under rare c'u^cum- 
stances may CHE 610 be repeated. 



Communication Studies 



Communication Studies 

512 Main Hdl 

West Chester Universit)' 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2500 

Dr. Klinzing, Chairpenon 

Dr. Levasseur, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Kevin W. Dean, Ph.D., University of Mary/and 
Anita K. Focman, Ph.D., Temple University 
Elaine B. Jenks, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Dennis R. Klinzing, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
C.Jack Orr, Ph.D., Temple University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Tim J. Brown, Ph.D., Ohio University 
David G. Levasseur, Ph.D., University of Kansas 
Michael V. Pearson, Ph.D., Temple University 
Martin S. Remland, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
Philip A. Thompsen, Ph.D., University of Utah 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Edward Lordan, Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Lisa Millhous, Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Programs of Study 

The master of arts in communication studies is a comprehensive 
program that focuses on communication and leadership. Specifically, 
the program develops students' knowledge and skills in these areas; 
all program courses explore some connection between communica- 
tion and effective leadership. While focusing on leadership, the pro- 
gram also offers students a comprehensive overview of communica- 
tion context. Since leaders must be able to communicate effectively 
in many different settings, the program seeks to build students' 
understanding and abilities across a broad array of communication 
contexts (including organizational communication, interpersonal 
communication, small group communication, mass media commu- 
nication, and public relations communication). 
The M.A. in communication studies also is designed as both an 
academic and a professional development degree. All courses, taught 
by University professors, are built on communication theory and 
research. With this firm academic foundation, many students com- 
plete the program and pursue additional graduate work at the Ph.D. 
level. The program also offers a thesis option for students interested 
in pursuing a large-scale research project in preparation for fiiture 
Ph.D. work. In terms of professional development, all courses 
explore pragmatic issues of communication. With an emphasis on 
enhancing their abilities as communicators and leaders, students can 
further their chosen career goals, and perhaps future success, by 
exploring up to 15 credits outside the Department of 
Communication Studies. For example, students interested in admin- 
istrative work can take elective courses in the M.S. in administration 
program. The department faculty also are ideally suited to help with 
students' professional development goals because they serve as com- 
munication consultants to groups and organizations outside the 
University. 

Since the program is designed to enhance students' communication 
skills, courses within the program require extensive speaking and 
writing. Courses are generally taught as small discussion-oriented 
seminars, and most course grading centers on students' presenta- 
tions and papers. 



MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

Admission Requirements 

Admission to the program is contingent on satisfactory review of 
the following data. No single deficit will preclude a student from 
gaining admission. Analysis and consideration of all the material to 
document the following will be evaluated: 

• The undergraduate GPA should be at least a 2.75 overall, and a 
minimum of 3.0 in the student's declared major. 

• The Graduate Record Exam or Miller Analogies Test should 
show a verbal score ranking in the 50th percentile or above. No 
test scores are required for students with an undergraduate GPA 
of 3.5 or above. Test scores may also be waived (by discretion of 
the graduate coordinator) for students who have successfully 
completed graduate-level courses. 

• Undergraduate major preparation. Students in majors other than 
communication or its related areas (e.g., English, psychology, 
sociology, political science) may need to complete remedial 
undergraduate course work prior to starting in the program. 

• Writing sample of work submitted by the student in response to 
past assignments, job activity, or creative endeavors 

• Three letters of recommendation 

• A goals statement written on the topic, "How Does 
Communication Knowledge Bridge My Past Experience With 
My Future Plans?" 

Three additional items may be used to support an application for 
admission: 

1. Work experience that indicates communication skill 

2. Extra or co-curricular activities 

3. Interview with the graduate coordinator and/or the graduate 
committee 

Maintenance in Good Standing 

To remain in good standing, a student must maintain a minimum, 
overall graduate GPA ot 3.0 or above. 

Admission to Degree Candidacy 

At the completion ot 12 semester hours (at least nine ot which are 
within the department), a minimum graduate GPA ot 3.0 or better 
must be earned for candidacy to be achieved. At candidacy, a major 
adviser is selected. 



Curriculum 

Nonthesis 

I . Required core 

COM 500 and 502 

15 semester hours selected from 

II. Elective courses 
These courses are to be selected 
communication studies courses. 
(COM 598) may be elected upo: 
required core. 

Thesis 

I. Required core 
COM 500, 502, and 600 
15 semester hours selected from 

II. Elective courses 
These courses are to be selected 
communication studies courses. 



36 semester hours 

21 semester hours 

departmental offerings 

15 semester hours 
from other departments or from 
A six-credit graduate internship 
n successfijl completion of the 

27 semester hours 

departmental offerings 

9 semester hours 
from other departments or from 



Comprehensive Elxaminations 

After the completion of all course work, nonthesis and thesis stu- 
dents will take a comprehensive written examination. Thesis stu- 
dents will defend their theses orally. 



Communicative Disorders 



COURSE DKSCRIPTIONS 
COMMUNICATION STUDIES 

Symbol: COM 

500 Cummunication and Leadership (3) 

Exploration ot the interconnections between com- 
munication principles and the theorv' and practice 
of leadership. 

501 Theoretical Perspectives on I luman 
Communication (3) A comprehensive examination 
of major theoretical perspectives on human com- 
munication ranging from classical to contemporary. 

502 Communication Research Methods (3) An 
examination ot the major issues pertaining to 
inquiry in human communicatit)n, mcluding the 
nature of inquiri", qualitative and quantitative 
methodological approaches to communication 
research; monil and ethical standards for human 
reseiirch; the role ot the rcsc;u'cher; and comparisons 
of academic research. Students will be required to 
design and execute a research project. 

503 Communication and Persuasive Influence 
(3) An analysis of major conceptual approaches to 
persuasion and their implications for understand- 
ing influence contexts and designing pragmatic 
strategies. 

504 The Symbol Systems of Communication (3) 
Students will explore the verbal and nonverbal 
components of message creation in communica- 
tion using primar)' theories to analyze language 
variables in different settings. 

505 Rhetoric and Leadership (3) The criticism and 
histon' ot influence will he explored to focus on 
examples of persuasion through public discourse. 

506 Communication in Small Groups (3) An 
examination of traditional and contemporary 
research which pertains to various dimensions of 
small group communication including, but not 



limited to, the following topics: structure, size, 
tasks, goals, roles, systems, and leadership. 

507 Issues in Mass Communication (3) An over- 
view of the mass communication systems, includ- 
ing an analysis of the elements and processes of 
these media, their functions, and the major issues 
attending their use in our culture. 

508 Special Topic Seminar (3) An intensive ex- 
amination of a selected area within communica- 
tion study. Topics will vary and will be announced 
in advance of each semester. 

509 Communication and Conflict Resolution 
(3) Using both theoretical and activity-centered 
learning, the student will explore the options avail- 
abje to resolve conflict through communication. 
520 PoUtical Communication (3) Examines the 
role communication plays in the political system 
with a specific focus on campaign communication, 
political advertising, and media coverage of politics. 
525 American Public Address (3) Critical and the- 
oretical examination of significant speeches in 
American history (from early American history to 
contemporary times). 

530 Advances in Nonverbal Communicarion (3) 
This course investigates recent advances and con- 
troversies in nonverbal communication theor)' and 
research. 

550 Public Relations Research and Writing (3) 
Familiarizes students with the skills needed to work 
as a public relations writer and editor. Explores 
applicable media theories as well as ethical and legal 
issues. 

570 Conceptual Foundations for Communica- 
tion, Training, and Development (3) This course 
examines major schools of thought in organiza- 
tional training and development. Each viewpoint 
is explored for its diagnostic guidance, learning 
implications, and training technologies. 



571 Practicum in Communication, Training, and 
Development (3) Participants will review and prac- 
tice the leading training technologies in communi- 
cation and organizational development. Each par- 
ticipant will design and deliver a training workshop. 
575 Seminar on Speech Pedagogy (3) An exami- 
nation of pedagogical research on the development 
of effective public speakers. Provides opportunities 
for both training speakers and critiquing public 
presentations. 

598 Graduate Internship in Communication 
Studies (3-6) Supervised professional training in 
approved communication placements. PREREQ; 
Approval of department chairperson. 

599 Directed Graduate Studies (3) Research proj- 
ects, reports, readings in speech communication. 
PREREQ;^ Approval of department chairperson. 

600 Communication Studies Thesis (3-6) 
Original research, super\'ised through topic selec- 
tion, investigation, and oral defense. 

Symbol: THA 

506 Theatre Theory and Production (3) A survey 
of theatre history and practice. Students select 
specific areas of production and st)'le for class- 
room, presentation, analysis, and research. 
516 Theory and Application of Creative 
Dramatics (3) The use of creative dramatics as a 
teaching method. Research and application of the- 
ories and techniques. 

550 Summer Drama Workshop (1-6) An inten- 
sive combination ot instruction and applied pro- 
duction experiences. Graduate students will 
research production theories and submit scholarly 
papers at the end of the session. Offered in sum- 
mer only. 



Communicative Disorders 

Speech and Hearing Clinic 

201 Carter Drive 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-3401 

Dr. Weiss, Chairperson and Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Cher)! D. Gunter, Ph.D., University of Texas -Austin 
Michael S. Weiss, Ph.D., Purdue University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Mareile Koenig, Ph.D., University of Illinois 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Jennifer W. Means, SLP.D., Nova Southeastern University 

INSTRUCTOR 

Judith A. Curtin, M.S., Marquette University 

Program of Study 

The department offers the master of arts degree in communicative 
disorders. The student may choose a thesis or nonthesis program. 
Both programs are designed to strengthen the knowledge and skill of 
the practicing speech clinician, to provide the foundation for fiirther 



graduate study, and to afford an opportunity to complete require- 
ments toward professional certification by the American Speech- 
Language-Hearing Association. Attainment of the master's degree 
does not necessarily guarantee recommendation for certification. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN COMMUNICATIVE 
DISORDERS 

(60-66 semester hours) 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
degree program at West Chester University, applicants must: 

1. Present an undergraduate background of at least 30 semester 
hours distributed among the following areas of study: psycholo- 
gy, human development, linguistics, statistics, speech and lan- 
guage development, phonetics, speech disorders, language disor- 
ders, hearing disorders, basic speech and hearing science, and 25 
hours of super\'ised clinical obser\'ation. 

2. Present undergraduate transcripts showing at least a 3.0 overall 
grade point average (GPA) in their undergraduate degree pro- 
gram. Demonstrate at least a 3.0 GPA in courses in speech-lan- 
guage pathology and audiology. 



Communicative Disorders 



3. Demonstrate a reasonable degree of speech and language profi- 
ciencv which mav be measured by a written essay and a personal 
interview. 

4. Submit Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination 
scores for purposes of evaluation and guidance. 

5. Submit a log of undergraduate clinical practicum, when available. 

6. Submit three letters of recommendation. 

7. Submit a 750-word essay describing future goals, aspirations, and 
reasons for wanting to attend West Chester University. 

Admission to Degree Candidacy 

1. The applicant may iipply for degree candidacy after having com- 
pleted SPP 501, 502, and 508. Application must be made before 
the student has completed 15 semester hours of graduate work 
required for the degree. 

2. During the precandidacy -period, the applicant must maintain an 
overall GPA of 3.0. 

Degree Requirements 

1. The candidate must meet the general University requirements 
for the master's degree, including completion of all required 
courses, with an overall GPA of 3.0. 

2. The nonthesis candidate must perform satisfactorily on a com- 
prehensive written and oral examination, which may not be 



taken before the student's fmal semester ot course work. Those 
who fail the examination aiay repeat it once. The interval 
between the two examinations may not exceed one year. 

3. The thesis candidate does not take the comprehensive examina- 
tion but is required to participate in an oral defense and provide 
documentation that she/he has taken the ASHA certification 
examination. 

4. The candidate must satisfactorily complete SPP 501, 502, 508, 
511, 512, 514, 515, 523, 524, 526, 543, and 582; 18-24 semester 
hours of graduate clinical practicum; and six semester hours of 
elective course work chosen under advisement. 

5. The student must be in continuous enrollment. Exceptions may be 
granted by submitting a written request to the graduate coordinator. 

6. The M.A. requires the completion of at least 375 hours of clini- 
cal practicum, with a minimum of 325 hours with a grade of B 
or better required at the graduate level. 

Certification Programs 

Candidates for the master of arts in communicative disorders may be 
recommended for the Certificate ot Clinical Competence in Speech 
Language Patholog\' issued by the American Speech-Language- 
Hearing Association. They also may be recommended tor the 
Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate upon satisfactory completion 
of additional, required course work and cUnical practicum. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COMMUNICATIVE DISORDERS 

Symbol; SPP 

501 Foundations of Research in Speech 
Pathology (3) Introduction to the scientific 
process and to the interpretation and application 
of research in the speech sciences. A research proj- 
ect prospectus required. 

502 Experimental Phonetics (3) Study of acoustic 
and physiological mechanisms underlying speech 
production and perception. Current theoretical 
models are reviewed and analytical instrumentation 
demonstrated. Students are provided with lahora- 
tor\' experiences to complement lecture materials. 
508 Neurology of the Speech and Hearing 
Mechanism (3) This course provides the student 
with information concerning the neuroanatomical 
and neurophysiological mechanisms underlying 
the speech and hearing process. 

511 Child Language Disorders 1: - 5 years (3) 
Explores disorders ot early language acquisition 
and factors that may place infants and toddlers at 
risk for normal communication development. 
Assessment and intervention are examined from 
the perspective of developmental, behavioral, 
team-based, and tamilv-centcred trameworlcs. 

512 Child Language Disorders II: School Age 
Children and Adolescents (3) Explores disorders of 
later language acquisition and the interaction of lan- 
guage disorders with academic achievement, espe- 
cially in the acquisition of literacy skills. Diagnostic 
assessment and treatment approaches arc developed 
using the framework proposed by ASHA. 

514 Adult Neurogenic Language Disorders (3) 
Examines the vaious causes, classifications, diag- 
noses, and treatments of language disorders in 
adults who have sustained brain damage. 



515 Adult Neuromotor Speech Disorders (3) 

Examines the various causes, classifications, diag- 
noses, and treatments of speech disorders in adults 
who have sustained neurological damage. 

523 Voice Disorders (3) Examination of classifi- 
cation, etiology, diagnosis, and therapy for tiinc- 
tional, organic, and psychological voice disorders. 

524 Fluency Disorders (3) Consideration of the 
nature, causes, diagnosis, and treatment ot stutter- 
ing and related disorders of speech flow. Critical 
review of pertinent research. 

526 Articulatory Phonology (3) Theoretical con- 
siderations, research findings, and clinical practices 
concerning disordered speech sound production. 
543 Therapy for the Hearing Impaired (3) 
Evaluative and therapeutic materials and methods 
applicable to the improvement ot communication 
in hard-of-hearing individuals. 
550 Advanced Diagnostic and Therapeutic 
Methods in Speech Pathology (3) Current and 
advanced evaluative methods and materials appli- 
cable to the diagnosis and remediation of commu- 
nication disorders. 

♦ 551 Graduate Clinical Practicum (1.5-3) 
Super\'ised practice in the Speech and Hearing 
Clinic. Designed to increase diagnostic and thera- 
peutic skills with children and adults who have 
communication problems. I'REREQ; Permission 
of department. Must be completed with a GPA 
of at least .'^.O in all SPP 551 practicums. 

♦ 552 Affiliation Practicum (3, 6, 9) Supervised 
practice in an alTiliated clinic or school. Designed 
to increase diagnostic and therapeutic skills with 
children and adults who have communication dis- 
orders. PREREQ: Permission of department and 
GPA of at least 3.0 in all SPP 551 practicums. 

♦ 560 Seminar in Speech Pathology (1-3) 
Selected theoretical and clinical areas of speech 



pathology and related disciplines. Topics vary each 
semester according to research developments and 
student needs. 

561 Seminar in Audiology (3) Selected areas in 
audiology and related disciplines. Topics vary each 
semester according to developments in research 
and student needs. 

570 School Language, Speech and Hearing 
Programs (3) Orientation to and observation of 
the organization, administration, and operation ot 
school speech-language and hearing programs 
(preschool through grade 12). 
573 Administration and Supervision of Speech 
and Hearing Programs (3) Nature and scope of 
supervisory positions in speech and hearing pro- 
grams. Emphasis on administrative problems. 
580 Orofacial Anomalies (3) Comprehensive 
consideration of the nature, causes, diagnosis, and 
treatment of communication disorders associated 
with orofacial anomalies, particularly cleft lip and 
cleft palate. 

582 Dysphagia (3) This course prepares students 
to identify' anatomical and neurological structures 
in swallowing, as well as assess, treat, and modify 
diets for patients with normal and abnormal swal- 
lowing patterns, 

589 Neuromuscular Disorders (3) Nature, causes, 
diagnosis, and treatment ot communication disor- 
ders associated with neuromuscular dysfunction, 
with particular attention to the cerebral palsies. 

590 Independent Study (1-3) Individualized 
research projects, reports, and/or readings in speech 
pathology or audiology under faculty supervision. 
PRERF.Qi Approval of department chairperson. 
598 Workshop in Communicative Disorders (3) 
610 Thesis (1-6) 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Computer Science 



Computer Science 

404 Aiulcrson i l.ill 

West Chester L'niversity 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2204 

Dr. Fabrey, Chairperson 

Dr. Milito, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

610-436-2690 

PROFESSORS 

Richard Epstein, Pli.D., Temple University 

James D. I\ihrey, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute ofTechnology 

Elaine R. Milito, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Robert Kline, Ph.D., Washington University 
Richard Wyatt, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 
Cheer-Sun D. Yang, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Zhen Jiang, Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University 

Programs of Study 

The department offers a certificate program for students whose 
undergraduate degree is not in computer science, and a master of sci- 
ence degree for students who possess an undergraduate degree in com- 
puter science or a closely related discipline. Students who complete the 
certificate program will be awarded a certificate in computer science. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE 

The purpose of this program is to provide its graduates with the 
intellectual and practical tools that they will need either to pursue 
careers as professional computer scientists in industry or to pursue a 
doctor's degree in computer science at a doctoral-granting institu- 
tion. The curriculum is designed with three goals in mind: 

1. A solid foundation in the fundamental principles of computer 
science (the core). 

2. Exposure to a variety of subject areas (the 500-level electives). 

3. Exposure to research topics of current interest and to provide in- 
depth knowledge of several areas (the 600-leveI courses). 

The computing platform is UNIX-based workstations, and the pro- 
gramming paradigm is mairJy object oriented. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants for the master of science program in computer science must 
satisfy the general graduate admission requirements of the University. 
Further, applicants should possess an undergraduate degree in comput- 
er science or an equivalent degree. An applicant who does not have an 
undergraduate degree in computer science or the equivalent may, how- 
ever, apply for admission into the certificate program, wliich is an 18- 
credit progrvun designed to give students a broad knowledge of stan- 
dard topics in computer science. See "Certificate Program" below. 
Applicants also must submit scores for the general section of the 
Graduate Record Examination, unless they have an earned masters 
degree. Other circumstances may apply. 

A TOEFL score of 550 is required for non-native speakers only. 
Three letters of recommendation also are required of all appHcants. 

Degree Requirements 

A student must take a total of 33 semester hours from the following 
courses (subject to the stipulations listed below): 



33 semester hours 
12 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I . ■\11 four core courses 

CSC 520, 5.»0, 540, and 560 

II. At least four 500-level electives 

Chosen from the following: 

CSC 525, 535, 545, 555, 565, 570, 573, 575, and 581 



at least 12 semester hours 



IBL At least two 600-Icvel courses at least 6 semester hours 

Chosen from the following: 

CSC 600 (see stipulation #3 below), 610, 620 

Stipulations: 

1. A student must complete the four core courses within the first 
six courses taken. 

2. All core courses must be completed before a student can take a 
600-level course. 

3. The advanced seminar course offers a variety of advanced topics 
in computer science. Different topics will be listed as different 
sections of this course. A student must take at least one section 
and not more than two of these. 

4. A student who elects to do a master's thesis must take CSC 610 
(independent research) and CSC 620 (thesis). CSC 610 may 
count for credit towards the degree only once. 

Thesis Options 

Independent Research (CSC 610) 

The student may work in one of three directions for this course: 

1. Master's thesis preparation: After consulting with a faculty advis- 
er, the student will conduct a comprehensive literature search in 

a research area, write a detailed report on the current state of the 
art in that area, and develop a thesis proposal. 

2. Individual project: The student will work on a substantial pro- 
gramming project throughout the semester. The student will be 
expected to do sufficient background research and then design, 
as needed, all the data structures, flow of control, and so forth, 
required for implementation. 

3. Team project: The student will be involved in an ambitious soft- 
ware development project with at least one other student under 
the guidance of the adviser. This course emphasizes the develop- 
ment of those capabilities that are considered especially impor- 
tant in the practical world of computing, such as written and oral 
communications skills and the ability to work as part of a team. 

Thesis (CSC 620) 

The student is to carry out the research proposal developed in CSC 
610. At the completion of the project, the student must submit a 
bound manuscript that meets the approval of the graduate committee. 

Certificate Program 

This program is designed for students whose undergraduate degree 
is not in computer science. The certificate program in computer sci- 
ence has two fimdamental purposes: 

1. To serve as a "bridge" between an undergraduate degree in some 
field other than the discipline of computing and the regular mas- 
ter's degree program in computer science. 

2. To allow those who wish to study computing at the graduate 
level, without pursuing a master's degree, to do so. 

The program consists of six, three-credit courses offered over two 
semesters. These graduate-level courses are specifically designed to 
give students broad knowledge of those topics in computer science 
that would be known by a college graduate in the field. Students 
who complete the prerequisite program with a 3.0 GPA or better 
will receive a certificate in computer science. They also \vill be enti- 
tled to enter the computer science master's degree program. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant is expected to have a bachelor's degree fi^om an accred- 
ited institution including four semesters of mathematics including 
Calculus I and discrete math. Non-native speakers are expected to 



C'lniiTiflinn and KduLatitmal I'sycholop- 



have a TOEFL score of 550. Three leners of recommendation are 
required of all applicants. 

Curriculum 18 semester hours 

Fall Semester: 

CSC 512,514,220 
Spring Semester: 

CSC 513, 516. 517 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COMPUTER SCIENCE 

Symbol: CSC 

CSC 512 - CSC 517 may not be used for credit 
in the master's degree program. 

512 Computer Programming I (3) The principles 
ot algorithmic problem sohing is introduced using 
the C*+ language. This course teaches program- 
ming techniques which involve elementary data 
and control structures. 

513 Computer Programming II (3) This course 
further develops the topics started in Computer 
Programming I with a strong emphasis on soft- 
ware issues and object-oriented program design. 
PREREQ:CSC512. 

514 Computer Organization (3) This course 
introduces students to the basics of computer 
hardware design, including digital logic and hard- 
ware components. Assembly-level programming is 
taught as a tool for understanding how it is used 
bv compilers of high-level languages. 

516 Introduction to Data Structures and Algo- 
rithms (3) This course introduces the definitions, 
implementations, and applications of the most 
basic data structures used in computer science. 
The concept of abstract data type is introduced 
and reinforced bv the object concept of C++. 
PRF.REQ:CSC'512, 

517 Programming Paradigms (3) This course is 
designed to develop students' understanding of 
the nature of programming languages and to 
enhance their programming skills. The approach 
is more formal than in a beginning course and 
emphasizes both the general features of languages 
and sound problem-solving methods. PREREQ^ 
CSC 512. 

520 Foundations of Computer Science (3) This 
course offers an advanced treatment of many of 
the theoretical areas underlying other computer 
science subjects. 

525 Operating Systems (3) This course covers 
the basic features of operating systems. Examples 
will be drawn from UNIX and other operating 
systems. This course includes an intensive study of 



the UNIX operating system by way of the UNIX 
kernel commands and utilities. 
530 Data Structures (3) This course builds on 
rudimentary understanding of linked structures 
and develops complex data structures such as trees, 
hash tables, graphs, etc. It also introduces the 
basics of asymptotic analysis of running time and 
space in order to provide the justification for vari- 
ous data structures. 

535 Networks and Data Commurucations (3) This 
course provides in-depth studies ot various aspects of 
modem telecommunication sv'stems such as network 
design, network implementation, serial port commu- 
nicanons, and user interfaces. 
540 Programming Languages (3) This course 
introduces the theoretical ;md practical foundations 
of programming languages from the point of view ot 
design and implementation. 
545 Database System Concepts (3) This course 
emphasizes recent technological advances in data- 
base management systems. The course centers 
around data models and languages for those data 
models. Special attention is paid to relational and 
object-oriented data models and systems which 
implement these. PREREQ^CSC 520. 
555 Software Engineering (3) TTiis course 
emphasizes important topics in software engineer- 
ing from an object-oriented point of view (as 
opposed to the older ftinctional, or structural 
analysis approach). 

560 Analysis of vVlgorithms (3) This course intro- 
duces the methods to ana!)'ze the efBcienc")' of com- 
puter algorithms in terms of their use of both space 
and time. Algorithmic design techniques, such as di- 
vide and conquer, greedy methods, and dynamic pro- 
gramming are illustrated throughout the course. The 
theory of NP-completeness and tractibility is intro- 
duced. PREREQ: CSC 520. 
565 Compiler Design (3) An in-depth study of 
the principles and design aspects of programming 
language translation. Students will design and 
implement a compiler using standard UNIX-based 
compiler tools for a small but representative lan- 
gu.igc. PREREQ: CSC 520. 
570 Computer Architecture (3) This course will 



study the methodology for design of components 
and interfaces in a uniprocessor computer. Various 
architectures/machine languages are compared, 
and one is studied in depth. 
573 Graphics and User Interfaces (3) This course 
covers the basic aspects of generating and trans- 
forming computer graphical images. PREREQ; 
Linear algebra background. 

575 Artificial Intelligence (3) Artificial Intelligence 
(AI) aims to reproduce or simulate the intelligent 
capacities of human beings such as forming plans of 
action and conversing in English. This course will 
combine theoretical, practical, and programming 
aspects of Al. Common Lisp will be used for pro- 
gramming projects. PREREQ; CSC 520. 
581 Topics in Computer Science (3) This course 
will allow instructors to teach a 500-level (not 
research-oriented) course in a computer science 
topic not specified in the current course list. 
Different topics will be taught as different sections 
of this course. PREREQ^To be determined by 
topic. 

600 Advanced Seminar (3) This is a research-ori- 
ented course which will involve an investigation 
into an advanced and spcciahzed topic determined 
according to faculty and smdent interest. PRE- 
REQ; Completion of 18 graduate credits includ- 
ing the core courses. 

605 Internship in Computer Science (3) Provides 
the student with professional development and 
work experiences in the computer science field. 
PREREQ; Successftd completion of the four core 
courses in the M.S. computer science program: 
CSC 520, 530, 540, 560. 

610 Independent Research (3) The smdent may 
work in one of three directions: thesis, individual 
project, or team project. (See "Thesis Options" 
above.) PREREQ; The agreement of the faculty 
member to act as an adviser. 
620 Thesis (3) A continuation of Independent 
Research. (See "Thesis Options" above.) PRE- 
REQ; The permission of the thesis adviser, and 
approval of the thesis proposal by the computer 
science graduate committee. 



Counseling and Educational Psychology 



201 Recitation Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2559 

Dr. Spradlin, Chairperson 

Dr. Hinson, Assistant Chairperson 



PROFESSORS 

Deborah S. Brown, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Angelo F. Gadaleto, Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Wallace]. Kahn, Ph.D., University of Maryland 
Richard D. Parsons, Ph.D., Temple University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Patricia Broderick, Ph.D., Temple University 



Counseling and Educational Psychology 



Stephanie L. llinson, Kd.U., Urnvcnily oj Vtr^tma 
Carol M. Napicrkovvski, Ph.D., Univenity of Connecticut 
Lynn Kell Spradlin, Ed.D., University of Louisville 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Naijian Zhang, Ph.D., Ball State University 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Counseling and Educational Psychology offers 
two master of education degree programs, one in elementary school 
counseling and another in Secondary school counseling. Completion 
of the M.Ed, school counseling programs academically qualifies 
candidates for the Pennsylvania Educational Specialist I Certificate 
which is required for employment as an elementary or secondary 
school guidance counselor. Individuals who have earned a master's 
degree in counseling or a counseling-rclated area may pursue a non- 
(.iegree program of study (certification only) leading to the 
I'.ducational Specialist I Certificate. The department also offers a 
master of science degree for individu;ils who will seek employment 
as student service professionals in higher education settings, or as 
counselors in community service agencies/programs and business 
employee assistance programs. A post-master's certificate program is 
offered for individuals who have completed a master's degree in 
counseling or a closelv related area and would like to build their 
clinical mental health skills while completing the educational 
requirements for licensure as a professional counselor. 
The department's Web page, which describes programs ot study in 
more detail, can be reached through the University's home page: 
w\\^v. wcupa.edu. 

Admission Requirements 

When admitting an applicant to the counselor education programs, 
the department makes a commitment to the student's development 
and fiiture success. The department evaluates each candidate through 
the use of multiple criteria. Admission requires an undergraduate 
degree from an accredited college or universirv. The normal, expected 
standard tor students applying to counselor education programs is a 
3.0 grade point average (GPA) on a 4.0 scale. Candidates with less 
than a 2.8 undergraduate GPA must submit scores from cither the 
Miller Analogies Test or Graduate Record Examination. In addition 
to undergraduate grades, all candidates must submit three letters of 
reference. Candidates may also be assessed by way ot an interview. 

Degree Requirements 

After completion of 15 credit hours but prior to enrolling for 25 
credit hours of counselor education course work, students are eligi- 
ble and must apply tor degree candidacy. 
Degree Candidacy Requirements: 

1. Students must achieve a grade of B (83 percent) or better in all 
Competency Area I courses taken at the point the application is 
submitted. 

2. Students must successtiilly complete the Level One (multiple . 
choice) Degree Candidacy Competency Exam. 

3. Faculty will be asked to share any concerns with the student's 
interpersonal skills and/or overall mental health. If concerns are 
expressed, a formal assessment may be required prior to granting 
degree candidacy. 

4. Students seeking certification as a school counselor must already 
be certified by the PennsyK-ania Department of Education (PDE) 
in another subject area or must successtiilly complete the PDE 
required Praxis PPST and Listening Skills Test. 

Following completion of the prescribed course work and the advis- 
er's recommendation, candidates must pass the Level Two Com- 
prehensive Exam that is based on client case scenarios. The degree 
or certification being pursued will be granted only when the student 



has met the department's standards. Students desiring the M.Ed, 
degree without PDE certification may take six credits of electives 
under advisement in lieu of the practicum requirements. 

Educational Specialist I Certificate 

In order to obtain the Educational Specialist 1 Certificate, the stu- 
dent must successfully complete the required practicum in an 
approved secondary or elementan- school. This course provides an 
opportunity for the student, under West Chester University faculty 
supervision, to work closely with a professional counselor in a public 
school. The certificate is issued on the basis of the program approval 
status of the counselor education program at the University as 
granted by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 
COUNSELING OPTION 

Dr. Spradlin, Program Coordinator 

Curriculum 48 semester hours 

I. Common Core Requirements 27 semester hours 
(Common core requirements do not have prerequisites.) 
Competency Area I: EDC 503, 567, 570, 571, and EDF 502 
Competency Area II: EDC 520, 521, 540, 556 

II. Speciality Requirements 15 semester hours 
EDC 572, 574, 576, 585, and EDF 510 or 589 

ID. Field Experience . 6 semester hours 

EDC 590 and 593 (may not be taken concurrently) 

MASTER OF EDUCATION: SECONDARY SCHOOL 
COUNSELING OPTION 

Dr. Napierkowski, Program Coordinator 

Curriculum 48 semester hours 

I. Common Core Requirements 27 semester hours 
(Common core requirements do not have prerequisites.) 
Competency Area I: EDC 503, 567, 570, 571, and EDF 502 
Competency Area II: EDC 520, 521, 540, 556 

II. Speciality Requirements 15 semester hours 
EDC 573, 575, 576, 585, and EDF 510 or 589 

in. Field Experience 6 semester hours 

EDC 591 and 593 (may not be taken concurrently) 

MASTER OF SCIENCE: HIGHER EDUCATION/ 
POST SECONDARY COUNSELING OPTION 

Dr. Zhang, Program Coordinator 

Curriculum 48 semester hours 

I. Common Core Requirements 27 semester hours 
(Common core requirements do not have prerequisites.) 
Competency Area I: EDC 503, 567, 570, 571, and EDF 502 
Competency Area II: EDC 520, 521, 540, 556 

II. Speciality Requirements 15 semester hours 
EDC 530, 573, 575 

Six credits of electives (must have approval of adviser) 

III. Field Experience 6 semester hours 
EDC 592 and 593 (may not be taken concurrendy) 

Post-Master's Certificate in Professional Counselor 
Licensure Preparation 

Dr. Parsons, Program Coordinator 

The post-master's certificate in professional counselor licensure prepara- 
tion is designed to meet the education and internship requirements of 
counselors who aspire to obtain licensure in the state of Pennsylvania. The 
program has been designed \vith a commitment to education and training 
that will provide the skills and confidence needed for holders of the certifi- 
cate to pro\ide competent and ethical professional counseling services. 

Curriculum 15 semester hours 

1. Required 12 semester hours 

EDC 610, 620, and 650 



L'dunsclinj!; and Educational Psychology 



II. Electives* minimum 3 semester hours 

Course selection with permission of adviser. 
EDC 594-598, EDC 630, PSY 517/519 
Other counselor education courses 

• Only courses taken post master's at WCU will be counted toward certificate 
required credits. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

Symbol: EDC 

503 Professional Orientation to Counseling (3) 

An introductorj- course designed to examine the 
philosophical and educational antecedents of the 
counseling movement in the United States and 
current trends as well as contemporar)' issues relat- 
ing to the deliver)' of counseling services. Work 
environments and fiinctions of master-level coun- 
selors will be explored. 

520 Counseling for Human Differences (3) This 
course explores ditYercnt racial, social class, gender, 
and ethnic group orientations to counseling and 
examines exceptionality implications in applying 
traditional counseling approaches for use with 
diverse client populations. 

521 Human DevelopmentThrough the Life 
Span for Counselors (3) Exploration of cognitive, 
social, emotional, and physical development over 
the life span. This course examines both theor)' 
and research in human development and applies 
this knowledge to the practice of counseling. 

530 The College Student (3) The course will 
include an over\icw of the student services profes- 
sion. Theories of student development and their 
application to student services will be examined. 
Issues of contemporary students will be explored. 
540 Assessment Methods in Guidance (3) 
Emphasis is on the test and nontest assessment of 
intelligence, achievement, special abilities, and 
aptitudes, including concepts such as reliability, 
validity, and standardization. 
545 Psychometric Interpretation (3) A survey 
course involving the u.se ot psychometrics as the 
vehicle for the diagnosis of learning problems. Test 
interpretation and reporting are emphasized. 
556 Career Development Theories and 
Practices (3) Theories and techniques relating to 
career development in children, adolescents, and 
adults. Career development programming within 
the context of a systems approach is stressed. 

567 Group Dynamics (3) This course in group 
processes focuses on the identification of the 
imphcit and explicit role fijnctions of the group 
member and the group leader. The recognition 
and awareness of one's behavior with multiple 
feedback sources is of primary concern. The major 
objective of this course is to initiate, develop, and 
master relationships in a group setting. 

568 The Professional Counselor in the Elemen- 
tary School (3) Role, responsibilities, and practices 
of the contemporary elementar)' school counselor 
Development of the guidance program; relationship 
to curricula; position of the counselor with respect 
to administration, parents, children, and teachers. 

569 The Professional Counselor in the Secondary 
School (2) Role, res()<)nsibilitics, and practice ot the 
contemporary secondary school counselor. Referral 
resources, parental conference techniques, relation- 
ship with administration and staff, curricula, and 
administrative aspects of the guidance program. 

570 Fundamentals of the Helping Relationship 
(3) The course will introduce students to the 



counseUng process. Communications skills essen- 
tial to the helping relationship will be taught and 
practiced in a counseling lab. 

571 Theories of Counseling (3) The basic theo- 
ries of counseling, with emphasis on historical and 
philosophical origins. Historical antecedents of 
each theory, and evaluation of the potential of 
each theory as a viable approach for counselors. 

572 CounselingTechniques in Elementary 
School (3) Practical application of basic theories 
and techniques of individual counseling with chil- 
dren in elementary school settings. The preprac- 
ticum course includes actual counseling experience 
with chUdren. PREREQ: EDC 570 and EDC 571. 

573 CounselingTechniques with Adolescents and 
Adults (3) Practical application of the basic theories 
and techniques of individual counseling with adoles- 
cents and adults. This prepracticum counse includes 
actual counseling experience with adolescents and 
adults. PREREQ: EDC 570 and EDC 571. 

574 Group Procedures in the Elementary 
School (3) Emphasis is on mastering the basic 
theories and techniques appropriate to group pro- 
cedures in the elementary school. Exposure to 
planning, implementing, and evaluating group 
activities. PREREQ: EDC 567. 

575 Group Procedures with Adolescents and 
Adults (3) Techniques for planning and imple- 
menting group procedures applicable to adoles- 
cents and adults. Topics include group counseling, 
group guidance, group process and outcome evalu- 
ation, and the legaL/ethical implications of group 
work. Each student is required to conduct a group 
counseling experience. PREREQ^ EDC 567. 

576 Consultation and Coordination in 
Guidance and Counseling (3) This prepracticum 
course focuses on models, mechanisms, and strate- 
gies of employing consultation and coordination in 
remedial and preventive interventions in educa- 
tional settings. Systems analysis and program 
development and evaluation will be addressed rela- 
tive to consultation and coordination. 

585 Contemporary Issues and Trends in 
Guidance (3) Contemporary issues and current 
trends in school guidance. The student evaluates 
basic positions and integrates them into the 
prospective role of a school counselor. 

590 Practicum in Elementary Guidance (3) Super- 
vised practice in an approved elcmcntan' school. In 
addition to work under the direction of a professional 
counselor in the school setting, the student meets on 
campus with the practicum supervisor for intensive 
seminar activities. PREREQ: EDC 572, 574, and 
576. EDC 540 and EDC 556 must be taken before 
or concurrently. Permission of adviser 

591 Practicum in Secondary Guidance (3) 
Supervised practice in an approved secondary 
school. The student works under the direction ot a 
professional counselor in the school setting and 
meets on campus with the practicum supervisor for 
intensive seminar activities. PREREQ;^ EDC 573, 
575, and 576. EDC 540 and EDC 556 must be 
taken before or concurrendy. Permission of adviser 

592 Practicum in Higher Education Guidance (3) 
Supervised counseling experiences within the high- 



er education system or another approved setting. A 
related on-campus seminar is included. PREREQ^ 
EDC 540 and 556 must be taken before or con- 
currently. Permission of ad\iser 
593 Counseling Internship (3) Intensive super- 
vised counseling experience in an approved setting. 
The practicum consists of on- and off-campus 
experiences. PREREQ: EDC 590 or 591 or 592. 
594-597 Workshop in Counselor Education (1-6) 

598 Workshop in Counselor Education (1-6) 

599 Independent Study (1-3) Independent 
research and study under the direction of a faculty 
member PREREQ; Permission of department 
chairperson and instructor 

610 The Diagnostic Intervention Connection 
for Professional Counselors (3) This seminar tar- 
gets the professional counselors' need to employ 
vahd diagnostic paradigms as the necessary step to 
effective intervention planning. The focus of this 
seminar is on application with students required to 
engage in client contact employing the diagnostic- 
treatment model presented in class. PRERECi; 
Graduate psychopathology course. Enrollment 
limited to counseling post-master's certificate stu- 
dents or with permission of instructor 
620 Advanced Counseling Intervention (3) This 
seminar will stress the application of clinical skills 
and will include a field component as well as a 
case conferencing format. Emphasis will be 
placed on treatment planning using mulriaxial 
diagnosis, implementation, and evaluation. PRE- 
REQi EDC 610 or permission of instructor. 
630 Systems Concepts and Skills for Profession- 
al Counselors (3) The course will pro\ide an 
introduction to systemic thinking, assist students 
in the development of skills necessary for systems 
assessment, and require students to employ sys- 
temic treatment, planning, and referral. 
650 Advanced Counselor Internship (3) This 
post-master's certificate course will provide sm- 
dents with supervised experience in the application 
of counseling and evaluation techniques in profes- 
sional settings appropriate to their career interests, 
skills, and program of study. Adviser must approve 
site selection. PREREQ; EDC 610 and EDC 620. 

EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATIONS 

Symbol: EDF 

502 Methods and Materials of Research for 
Counselor Education (3) Designed to enable the 
counselor to read experimcnhil, quasi-experimental, 
descriptive, and correlational research reported in the 
professional journals. Both univariate and multivari- 
ate designs are emphasized. PREREQ: EDC 540. 
583 The American School as Social Narrative (3) 
An integrated exploration of the philosophical cul- 
ture, social, and physical foundations of schooling 
and education in the United States. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Symbol: EDP 

550 Advanced Educational Psychology (3) 

Processes by which skills, understanding, concepts, 
and ideals are acquired; teaching practices in rela- 
tion to basic research concerning learning; similar- 



Criminal Justice 



itics and dittcrciucs in theories ot learning. 
557 Ksscntials of Learning (3) Study of the 
applications ot learning theory to classroom teach- 
ing, with emphasis on those principles derived 
from classical and operant conditioning. Retention 
and transfer ot learning also considered. 



560 Behavior Modification (3) Study of princi- 
ples of classical and operant conditioning as they 
relate to the modification of student behavior in 
residential and educational settings. Emphasis on 
such areas as classroom discipline, student values, 
and student study habits. 



569 Adolescent Development and Learning (3) 

Mental, physical, emotional, and social develop- 
ment and behavior of the adolescent with emphasis 
on various r\ pes of learning. Case studies are used. 
598 Workshop in Educational Psychology (3) 



Criminal Justice 



200 Ruby Jones Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2647 

Prof. Nestlerode, Chairperson 

Dr. Brewster, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Mary P. Brewster, Ph.D., Rutgers - The State University 
Jana L. Nestlerode, J. D., Widener University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Brian O'Neill, Ph.D., Citv University of New York 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Randolph T. McVey, Ph.D., Sam Houston State University 
Reginald Nealy, M.H.S., Lincoln University 
Dian Williams, Ph.D., Walden University 

Program of Study 

The master of science degree in criminal justice is multidisciplinary, 
flexible, and career oriented; staffed by experienced professionals; and 
the basis for pursuit of fiirther graduate study. While the department 
does not require a thesis, students may choose to write a thesis by 
enrolling in CRJ 610 and receiving six semester hours toward the M.S. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
graduate degree program at West Chester University, applicants 



must submit scores from the MAT. The department places special 
emphasis on the academic and professional goals statement found 
within the application. 

Degree Requirements 

Prior to receiving the master of science degree in criminal justice, all 
candidates must: 

1. file an application for admission to candidacy with the Office of 
Graduate Studies and Extended Education after completion of 
12 - 15 graduate credits, 

2. complete a minimum of 36 semester hours of course work with a 
minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 (based on a 4.0 system), and 

3. pass a comprehensi^'e examination or write a thesis. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Curriculum 36 semester hours 

A. Required 15 semester hours 
CRJ 505, 507, 508, and 509 

B. Optional Thesis 6 semester hours 

C. Electives 18-24 semester hours 
Chosen from among the following: 

CRJ 500, 503, 504, 506, 520, 522, 524, 526, « 

530, 535, 555, 560, 566, 570, 582, 590, 599, 

610 (six semester hours), and 999 

(All courses listed are three semester hours 

unless otherwise noted.) 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

Symbol: CRJ 

500 Evolutionary and Comparative Justice (3) 

This course is Intended to aid the graduate student 
in understanding the evolutionary influences on 
the American criminal justice system. Comparisons 
with simpler, more peacefiil societies will be used 
to analj-ze the advancement of law and justice. 

503 Criminal Behavior and the Law (3) This 
course is designed to help the student understand 
behavior by comparing criminal with normal 
behanor. A survey course, it re\iews types of abnor- 
mal behavior and mental disorders, methods ot 
diagnosis, and treatment and resolution of interper- 
sonal conflicts. Also included is an understanding of 
criminal beha\'ior as it applies to abnormality. 

504 Resolution of Interpersonal Conflicts (3) 
This course assists students in developing personal 
effectiveness in group situations. Emphasis will be 
on the development of competence in group lead- 
ership, abilit)- to translate the group experience into 
positive decisions about self and environment, and 
the ability to recognize changes that have affected 



one's life. The knowledge gained from this course 
will help students in relating to other persons in 
their personal, social, and vocational life. 

505 Nature of Crime and Delinquency (3) This 
course is a survey of the historical and contempo- 
rary attempts to explain the phenomena ot crime 
and criminal behavior from the perspectives of 
sociology, psychology, economics, biology, and law. 
Emphasis will be placed on contemporary theories 
and the analysis of evidence supportive of various 
theoretical positions. 

506 Criminal Justice Management (3) This 
course is intended to aid in the instruction of 
graduate students who are potential candidates for 
administrative positions. It brings together the 
most appropriate concepts from the various 
approaches and problems to management, e.g., 
staffing, decision making, motivation, leadership, 
communications, and control. 

507 Justice and Professional Ethics (3) Tliis 
course is designed to identiiy' and examine ethical 
issues among practitioners and students in the 
criminal justice field. Such issues include the dis- 
cretionary power of arrest, the use of deadly force, 
the decision to prosecute, participation in plea bar- 



gaining, representation of the guilty, and the 
imposition of punishment. 

508 Research Design and Analysis (3) This course 
is intended to introduce the graduate student to the 
process of social research. It discusses research con- 
cepts such as problem identification, data collection, 
data analysis, h)'pothesis testing, and the develop- 
ment of conclusions and recommendations. 

509 Criminal Jurisprudence (3) This course 
examines the complex concepts and principles of 
criminal law and procedure. The foundations of 
these disciplines will be initially reviewed, fol- 
lowed by a more comprehensive and incisive 
analysis and investigation of the difficult issues 
which have evolved through decisions of the 
United States Supreme Court. Supreme Court 
jurisprudence is examined and contrasted with the 
jurisprudence ot the Penns\'lvania courts. 

522 Occupational Crime (3) This course analyzes 
the usually nonviolent criminal conduct variously 
described as white-collar crime, official corruption, 
s\^temaric crime, corporate crime, or violations of 
trust that are characterized by calculation, deceit, 
and personal enrichment in one's job or profession. 
The influence of organized crime also is explored. 



Early Childhood and Special Education 



524 Juvenile Law (3) ITus course will bnng together 
the leading cases that have reached the Supreme 
Court, as well as other important federal and state 
court decisions relating to the juvenile justice process. 
526 Policing in America (3) This course is designed 
to examine current policing strategies and political 
issues that have developed as a result of those strate- 
gies. It also will explore the ftiture of policing in 
America and will present several interdisciplinar)- 
approaches to new theoretical perspectives. 
530 Interviewing and Counseling Techniques in 
Criminal Justice (3) In this course, techniques of 
counseling applicable to law enforcement and cor- 
rections officers are explored. Areas of study 
include the initial interview, interrogation, han- 
dling the informer, manipulative behavior of 
offenders, report writing, and the exit interview. 
Role playing and sociodrama arc used. 
535 Assessment Methods in Criminal Justice (3) 
This course will develop one's abihty to under- 
stand, recognize, describe, and interpret psychome- 
tric measures associated with juvenile and adult 
offenders. The student will develop an understand- 
ing of the use of tests in the criminal justice field. 



555 Topical Seminar in Criminaljustice(3) This 

course will proN-ide an intensive examination of a 
selected area of study in the field of criminal jus- 
tice. Topics will be announced at the time of offer- 
ing. This course may be taken more than once 
when different topics arc presented. 
560 Applied Legal Studies (3) This course pre- 
sumes a sophisticated working knowledge of crim- 
inal law and procedure (successful completion of 
CRJ 509). The course will examine selected factual 
accounts of criminal law and process. Through 
critical examination and analysis of these cases, the 
student will be able to understand the practical 
realities of the criminal justice system, and to 
compare theory and philosophy with practice. 
566 Contemporary Issues in Correcrions (3) 
This course is designed to analyze contemporary 
issues in the area of corrections. Such issues will 
include flat-time sentencing, private corrections, 
diversion, prison industries, inmate unions, and 
the elimination of parole. 

570 Women, Elderly, and Crime (3) This course 
is intended to introduce graduate students to the 
specific problems and conditions associated with 



female and elderU crime and victunization. The 
course will focus on the criminology, the law, and 
the response of the criminal justice system to the 
uniqueness of women and the elderly. 
582 Controversial Criminal Jurisprudence (3) 
This course presumes a sophisticated working 
knowledge of criminal law and procedure (success- 
fiJ completion of CRJ 509). It provides an in-depth 
analysis of the Supreme Court's historical and con- 
temporary approach to the most controversial issues 
of criminal law and procedure. The perspectives and 
arguments will be examined through the study and 
analysis of U.S. Supreme Court cases. 
590 Pracricum (1-6) A field experience (intern- 
ship) program tor preservicc students only. 
599 Independent Studies in Criminal Justice (1- 
3) This course will entail research projects, reports, 
and readings in criminal justice. Approval of the 
department chairperson is required. 
610 Thesis (6) Bound and shelved in the library, 
the thesis represents the student's ability to plan, 
organize, and direct a research effort designed to 
discover, develop, or verify' knowledge. 
999 Transfer Credits (1-6) 



Early Childhood and Special Education 

309 Recitation Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2579 

Dr. Finkel, Chairperson 

Dr. McGinley, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Judith S. Finkel, Ph.D., Union Graduate School 
Mary Ann O. Maggitti, Ph.D., Temple University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

George P. Drake, Jr., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Vitki A. McGinlcy, Ph.D., Temple University 
Catherine M. Prudhoc, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Donna Wandry, Ph.D., University of Florida 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Michael Bell, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Jennifer Bradley, M.Ed., Loyola College 

Cheryl DeLuca, Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 

Dana Henning, Ed.D., Temple University 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Early Childhood and Special Education offers 
programs leading to the master of education in special education 
and the master ot education in early childhood education. The 
department also offers a program leading to certification in special 
education and early childhood education. 
THE MASTER OF EDUCATION PROGRAM ALONE DOES NOT 
LEAD TO LEVEL I CERTIFICATION IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN EARLY CHILDHOOD 
EDUCATION 

Admission Requirements for Certified Teachers Seeking the 
M.Ed, in Early Childhood Education 

1. Undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university 



An undergraduate GPA of at least 2.8 on a 4.0 scale (If appli- 
cant possesses a master's degree, the GPA requirement applies to 
that degree.) 

3. Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate or its equivalent 

4. Evidence of course work in special education/inclusion. Students 
without this evidence will be required to complete an additional 
course during their M.Ed, program. 

Admission Requirements for Individuals Seeking the M.Ed, 
in Early Childhood Education But Not Certification 

These requirements apply to those individuals who do not hold a 
current teacher certification/license and do not wish to become cer- 
tified in early childhood education. These individuals are pursuing 
the master's degree only. 

1. Undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university 

2. An undergraduate GPA of at least 2.8 on a 4.0 scale (If appli- 
cant possesses a master's degree, the GPA requirement applies to 
that degree.) 

3. Evidence of course work in special education/inclusion. Students 
without this evidence will be required to complete an additional 
course during their M.Kd. program. 

Deg[ree Candidacy 

Students must apply for candidacy after the completion of 15 cred- 
its. Courses required during precandidacy are ECE 502 and ECE 
503. Students must maintain an overall GPA of at least 3.0 during 
candidacy. Admission to degree candidacy does not guarantee the 
automatic awarding of a degree upon completion. Only students in 
this category are eligible to take the comprehensive examination. 

Comprehensive Examination 

All students enrolled in the M.Ed, program are required to pass a 
comprehensive examination. A minimum of 24 credits of work 
(m-.Lximum of 30) must be completed by the end of the semester 
during which the student is planning to take the exam. Students 



Early Childhood and Special Education 



must tile a written request witli their adviser and the graduate coor- 
dinator to take the exam. This request should be filed no later than 
six weeks prior to the date of the exam. Students who fail one or 
more sections of the exam will receive a failing grade and will be 
required to retake the section(s) failed. A semester's interval is 
required between failure and re-examination. Students failing the 
exam should consult with an adviser for recommendations concern- 
ing hjrther preparation. Those who fail the exam twice must obtain 
approval of the graduate coordinator to take it a third and final time. 

Curriculum 36 semester hours 

I. Early Childhood Education Core 24 semester hours 

ECE 502, 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 508, and 509 

I I . Supporting Courses 6 semester hours 
EOT 500 and EDR 526 

in. Elective Courses 6 semester hours 

Selected under advisement 

POST-BACCAIv\UREATE CERTIFICATION IN 
IL\RLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant must have the following: 

1. A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or 
university 

2. An undergraduate GPA of at least 2.8 on a 3.0 scale (If appli- 
cant possesses a master's degree, the GPA requirement applies to 
that degree.) 

3. Passing scores, as established by the Penns\lvania Department of 
Education, on PPST reading, mathematics, and writing examina- 
tions. (Students may be admitted provisionally without these tests, 
but they must be completed within the fu'st semester of study.) 

4. Six credits of college-level mathematics, three credits of coUege- 
level English composition, and three credits of literature taught 
in English. If students do not meet these requirements, they 
must take these courses as additions to their programs of study. 

Formal Admission to Teacher Certification Program 

Students must do the following: 

1. Meet the above program entry requirements 

2. File a form in the Certification Office 

Certification Requirements 

For certification, students must have the following: 

1. Successfiil completion of the program of study 

2. AnoveraUGPAof3.0 

3. Six credits of college-level mathematics 

4. Three credits in college-level English and three credits in col- 
lege-level literature 

5. Passing scores on all pertinent Praxis examinations 

Curriculum 45 semester hours 

I. Professional Education Core 21 semester hours 
EDF 589, EDT 500, EDP 550, and 12 credits of 

student teaching (ECE 410/411) 

II. Early Childhood Education Core 12 semester hours 
ECE 502, 503. 505, and 506 

HI. Supporting Courses 12 semester hours 

EDA 511, EDR 510 and 526, MAT 553 

CERTIFICATION AND M.ED. IN EARLY 
CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Curriculum 57 semester hours 

Requires all 45 semester hours listed above plus ECE 504, 507, 508, 
and 509 (12 semester hours) 



MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SPECL\L EDUCATION 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
graduate degree program at West Chester University, all applicants 
seeking initial (Pennsylvania Level 1) certification through this mas- 
ter's degree are subject to the GPA admission requirements specified 
by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. 
In addition, certain specific criteria must be met: 

1. An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale calculated on the 
last 48 credits earned and minimum GPA of 2.5 for all under- 
graduate courses. (If applicant possesses a master's degree, the 
GPA requirement applies to that degree.) 

2. If undergraduate GPA (on last 48 credits) is less than 3.0, candi- 
date may submit satisfactory GRE or MAT scores (at or above 
the 50th percentile) to demonstrate academic competences. 

3. Pennsylvania Instructional I Certificate. A copy of this certificate 
must be submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies for admission. 

4. A statement of goals 

5. Three letters of reference 

6. Approval by the Department of Special Education 

7. Approval by the dean of graduate studies 

Degree Candidacy 

Students must apply to be admitted to candidacy after the comple- 
tion of 12 semester hours of work at West Chester University, 
including EDF 510 and two courses from the special education pro- 
gram, one of which must be EDA 541. Grade point averages must 
be consistent with standards required in graduate studies at West 
Chester University (minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0). 

Comprehensive Examination 

All students enrolled in the degree program are required to pass a 
comprehensive examination successfuDy. A minimum of 24 semester 
hours of work (maximum 30) must be completed by the end of the 
semester during which the student is planning to take the examina- 
tion. The student must file a written request with the graduate 
coordinator to take the examination. The request should be filed no 
later than six weeks prior to the date of the examination. 
Candidates who fail the comprehensive examination are permitted 
one re-examination within a two-year period. Candidates who fail 
the re-examination are dropped from the degree program. 

Curriculum 33 semester hours 

I. Professional Education Courses 6 semester hours 
Selected with adviser from EDF 500 or 501, 

EDF 510, EDP 550, and EDT 500 

II. Special Education Core 21 semester hours 
EDA 503, 505, 506, 507, 541, 580, and 591 

HL Areas of Concentration/Tracks 6 semester hours 

Student will select an area of concentration/track under advise- 
ment (two courses in each track). 

Behavior management Kinesiology 

Communication disorders Literac)' 

Counselor education Low-incidence disability 

Educational research Math 

Elementary education Music 

High-incidence disability Psychology 

Inclusion Secondat}' education 

Instructional technology Transition 

POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATION IN 
SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant must have the following: 



Earlv Childhood and Special Education 



1 . A baccalaureate degree from a regionally accredited college or 
universit)' 

2. A minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale calculated on the most 
recent 48 credits of college/university course work and 2.5 total 
undergraduate cumulative GPA. (If the applicant possesses a 
master's degree, the GPA requirement applies to that degree.) 

3. Evidence of having taken courses in mathematics and English 
(Students may be admitted provisionally without these courses; 
however, they must take them within the first two semesters of 
graduate work.) 

Formal Admission to Teacher Certification Program 

Students must do the following: 

1. Meet the above program entry requirements 

2. File a form in the certification office 

3. Receive a passing score on Praxis Skills examinations 

4. Receive department approval 



Certification Requirements 

For certification, students must have the following: 

1. Successfully completion of the course of study 

2. An overall GPA of 3.0 in certification area 

3. Six earned credits in college-level English composition and liter- 
ature 

4. Six earned credits in college-level mathematics 

5. Passing scores on the Praxis examinations 

Curriculum 39-54 semester hours 

I. Professional Education Core 0-15 semester hours 
Students must take 0-15 semester hours depending on their previ- 
ous area of study. 

EDC 521, EDF 500 or EDF 501, EDF 510, EDP 550, EDT 500 
Students must take 12 credits of student teaching if not previously 
certified. 

II. Special Education Core 30 semester hours 
EDA 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 541, 544, 573, 580, 581 

nL Supporting Courses 9 semester hours 

EDR 505 and 507, MTE 551 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

Symbol: ECE 

502 Advanced Child Development: Prebirth - 
Eight Years (3) Covers covers development of 
children prebirth through age eight. A review ot 
historical and contemporary theories of develop- 
ment as well as emerging research is included. 

503 Foundationsof Early Childhood Education 
(3) The content of this graduate course focuses on 
critically examining the historical, philosophical, and 
sociocultural foundations of early childhood educa- 
tion as well as contemporary issues in the field. 

504 Play su a Learning Medium (3) This course 
focuses on the significance of play in human 
development and learning, analysis ot play envi- 
ronments, and their contexts. 

505 Families, Communities, and Education in a 
Multicultural Society (3) This graduate course 
focuses on important contexts in which young 
children develop. The educator's role in relation to 
family cultures and communities will be analyzed. 

506 Curriculum and Assessment I: Birth 
Through Age Eight (3) This course focuses on 
curriculum development and assessment in early 
childhood education from historical, national, and 
cultural perspectives. 

507 Curriculum and Assessment II: Birth 
Through Age Eight (3) This coure builds on and 
expands curriculum and assessment knowledge in 
early childhood education. The course covers 
learning contexts, unit planning, family involve- 
ment, and classroom management. PREREQ; 
EDC 506. 

508 Advocacy and Leadership in Early 
Childhood Education (3) Personal service, leader- 
ship, and advocacy on behalf of children, families, 
and communities will be highlighted. Students 
will develop and action research proposal as a 
requirement of this course. 

509 The Early Childhood Professional as 
Researcher (3) Students in this course will con- 
duct "teacher as researcher" activities focused on 
early childhood education contexts. This course 
serves as the capstone for the master's degree in 
early childhood education. PREREQ: EDC 508. 



EARLY CHILDHOOD 

Symbol: EDE 

502 Introduction to Early Childhood Education 

(3) A basic course in early childhood education. 
Emphasis is on the historical and theoretical bases 
influencing education of young children. 

503 Contemporary Influences in Early Child- 
hood Education (3) Current factors that affect the 
educational needs of young children and classroom 
practices reflecting those influences. 

504 Early Childhood Programs (3) Model pro- 
grams in early childhood education, focusing on 
curriculum design and implementation in the pre- 
school and primary years. 

505 Seminar in Early Childhood Education (3) 
Selected problems in early childhood education. 
PREREQ: Permission of instructor. 

506 Infant and Toddler Development and 
Environment (3) Physical, social, emotional, and 
Intcllccmal development of the child newborn to 
two years is studied. The use of developmental 
tests for the diagnosis of infant and toddler needs 
is related to the structuring of an appropriate 
learning environment. 

507 Preschooling Learning Environment (3) 
Methods and materials, developmentally appropri- 
ate for children 2-5, arc presented. Readiness 
assessments, curricular discussions, and teaching 
approaches arc addressed across the full spectnim 
of child development. 

ECE 598 Workshop in Early Childhood 
Education (3) 

SPECIAL EDUCATION 

Symbol: EDA 

The following courses may he taken as electives by 
anyone in a graduate program, subject to approval 
from the department and the student 's adviser. 
500 Inclusive Classrooms (3) Designed to ac- 
quaint classroom teachers with special education 
students who will be integrated in a regular set- 
ting. Current regulations and ways of meeting 
educational needs will be reviewed. 
503 Family Systems in Special Education (3) 
This course bases its objectives on the knowledge 
of families of children with disabilities as essential 
for the child's education. The family is studied so 
that the teacher can best know how to work with 



diverse families and family s\'stems. 

504 Systematic Instruction of Life Skills (3) The 

purpose of this course is to introduce students to 
the essentials of the systematic instruction of func- 
tional life skills for learners with severe disabilities 
across the domains of a functional curriculum. A 
field component is required in the class. 

505 Advanced Methods for High-Incidence 
Disabilities (3) This course is designed to prepare 
teachers to work with children with high-inci- 
dence disabilities. It proxides an overNnew of cur- 
riculum and instructional methods. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding and analysis of learning 
problems and academic interventions. 

505 Advanced Methods for High-Incidence 
Disabilities (3) This course is designed to prepare 
teachers to work with children with high-inci- 
dence disabilities. It provides an overview of cur- 
riculum and instructional methods. Emphasis is 
placed on understanding and analysis of learning 
problems and academic interventions. 
507 Diversity Within the Context of Disability 
(3) Required for the post baccalaureate and 
M.Ed, programs in special education, this course 
gives students an opportunity to explore different 
race, social class, gender and ethnic group orienta- 
tions in relation to disability' staws in order to 
educate all children effectively. The course will 
cover desirable changes in attitude perceptions, 
understanding, and practices when working with 
exceptional children, )outh, and families. 

509 Single-Subject Research (3) This course 
addresses the application ot research methods 
commonly referred to as single-subject design to 
problems in education. 

510 Collaboration (3) This course will prepare 
teachers in inclusive strategies and effective skills 
for collaboration. Students will learn practic;il 
methods to support the needs of all st\idcnts in the 
K-12 classroom. Teachers will understand the 
importance of collaboration in the planning and 
evaluation of educational programs of children with 
disabilities in the general education classroom. 

511 Inclusion and Collaboration (3) The pur- 
pose of this course is to prepare teachers to cultur- 
al changes evident in American public education 
with respect to inclusion and the education of stu- 
dents with disabilities. Students will examine their 
beliefs about inclusion and collaboration, hear new 



Elementary Education 



perspectives on tliesc pliilusophies, learn how lo 
work collaboratively with other professionals, and 
learn practical methods to support all students in 
the classroom. 

512 Career Development and Transition in the 
Schools (3) This course will address lite-span 
issues for people with disabilities stressing assess- 
ment, planning, and instructional strategies that 
promote career development and transition educa- 
tion at the secondary age levels. Attention will be 
given to curricular benchmarks and standards, and 
how functional outcomes interact with those 
benchmarks and standards. 

513 Career Development and Transition Systems 
Structures (3) This course will address post-school 
support structures that serve students with disabili- 
ties as they transition into adult life, stressing leg- 
islative foundations, interagency linkages, school- 
business partnerships, referral processes, and seam- 
less systems of" service delivery. The teacher practi- 
tioner as change agent will be an underlying theme. 



541 Foundations of Special Education (3) Die 

study of children whose intellectual, physical, social, 
and/or emotional characteristics arc significantly dif- 
ferent from those of children whose needs are met 
through regular educational routes. 
544 Classroom Management (3) Exploration of 
current practices in the management and modifica- 
tion of hehavior The professional's role in achiev- 
ing a better basis for meaningfiil communication 
with the special child. Problems that may Interfere 
with teacher effectiveness arf discussed. PREREQi 
EDA 541 or equivalent. 

550 Special Topics (1-3) An in-depth study of 
selected special education topics relevant for pro- 
fessionals' academic growth. 
573 Assessment in Special Education (3) 
Diagnostic procedures and subsequent educational 
prescriptions useful with students experiencing learn- 
ing difficulties. PREREQ^ EDA 541 or equivalent. 

580 Contemporary Issues and Trends (3) 

Current trends, problems, and issues in special 



education, teacher education, research, and admin- 
istration will be explored. Emerging concepts 
relating to special education will be emphasized. 
PREREQ: EDA 541 or equivalent. 
581 Practicum: Special Education (3) Offers stu- 
dents an opportunity to put skills gained through 
course work into practice under supervision from 
the department. Weekly seminar required. PRE- 
REQ: EDA 541 or equivalent. 

590 Independent Study (1-3) 

591 Final Project (3) Ibis course will provide the 
student the opportunity to learn how to evaluate 
and interpret published research, to conduct a crit- 
ical research review, and to develop and produce 
an original research paper. Offered on a two- 
semester basis with each part carrying three cred- 
its. PREREQ; EDF 500. 

592-595 Workshops in Special Education (1-3) 
A number of these workshops will be focused on 
inclusive instruction and strategies. 



Earth Science — See Geology and Astronomy 
Economics — See Business 



Elementary Education 

106B Recitation Hall 
West Chester University 
West Chester, PA 19383 
610-436-2944 

Dr. DiLuccio, Graduate Coordinator for Elementary Education 
Programs 

PROFESSORS 

Lynda Baloche, Ed.D., Temple University 
Gail Bollin, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Da\'id F. Brown, Ed.D., University of Tennessee 
Martha Drobnak, Ed.D., Nova University 
Carol A. Radich, Ph.D., University of Maryland 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Wei Wei Cai, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 
Frances Slostad, Ed.D., Immaculata College 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Connie DiLucchio, Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Sara Lamb Kistler, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Donna Sanderson, Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Sally Winterton, Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Elementary Education oflfers graduate pro- 
grams in the following: a post-baccalaureate certification program in 
elementary' education; a master of education degree in elementarj- 
education with an emphasis in applied studies in teaching and 
learning; and a certificate of advanced graduate studv. Courses are 
available to teachers desiring permanent Pennsylvania elementary 
certification. Act 48 credits, or professional growth. 
On June 1, 1987, the Pennsylvania State Board of Education imple- 
mented revisions to the Pennsylvania School Code. These revisions 
require all students who apply for Pennsylvania teaching certificates 
to pass competency tests in basic skills, general knowledge, profes- 
sional knowledge, and specific knowledge of the subjects in which 
they seek teacher certification. Students also must demonstrate that 



they have met the requirement for computer literacv. 

As changes are made in requirements for elementary certification, 

it is the student's responsibility to satisfy the new requirements. 

After the student's application has been submitted to West Chester 
University's Office of Graduate Studies and Extended Education 
and appropriate transcripts have been received, the student will be 
mailed information regarding the program and advisement. 

POST-BACCALAUREATE CERTIFICATION 
PROGRAM 

The elementary education post-baccalaureate certification program 
is designed for candidates who did not major in elementary educa- 
tion as an undergraduate. The curriculum consists of a coherent 
group of courses and field experiences that are designed to help can- 
didates acquire the competencies required by the Pennsylvania 
Department of Education for the K-6 Instructional I Certificate. 

Admission Requirements 

1 . Applicants are expected to have an undergraduate degree from 
an accredited college or university. 

2. A minimum undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is 
required. If an applicant possesses a master's degree, the GPA 
requirement applies to that degree. 

3. Applicants must have earned six credits in college-level English 
composition and literature and six earned credits in college-level 
mathematics. 

4. Applicants must submit passing scores on the Praxis I Exam: 
Pre-Professional Skills Test. 

5. Applicants must submit a completed and signed "Formal 
Program of Study" to be filed in the Teacher Certification Office. 

6. Students applying for the certification program should be aware 
that a limited number of spaces are available in the program. 
Some students who meet the minimum requirements may not be 
admitted due to this space limitation. 

7. To maintain active graduate status, students enrolled in the ini- 
tial elementarv' education teaching certification program are 



I'.IciiH-ntarv F.ducition 



required to maintain continuous enrollment in the graduate pro- 
gram by registering for GSR 799 during any semesters they do 
not register for courses. If students register for undergraduate 
courses only during any semester, they must also register for 
GSR 799 to maintain active graduate status. GSR 799 is not a 
course and, therefore, does not incur any cost to students. 
Refer also to "Formal Admission to Teacher Education for 
Certification" under "Academic Information and Requirements." 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN ELEMENTARY 
EDUCATION 

The clementiu^' education master's degree with an emphasis in applied 
studies in teaching and learning gives experienced educators an oppor- 
tunity to advance the knowledge and skills needed to be practitioner- 
leaders within their profession. This program recognizes the value of 
experience; it has been developed to strengthen and deepen the prac- 
tice of educators through course work designed to emphasize reflec- 
tion, collaboration, and classroom-base inquiry. 
This 36-credit program includes an 18-credit core requirement, a 12- 
credit area of focused inquiry, the development of a professional port- 
folio, and a six-credit, classroom-based inquiry project. 

Admission Requirements 

1. Applicants for the degree program are expected to have an under- 
graduate degree from an accredited college or university, 
Pennsylvania Level 1 Teaching Certification or its equivalent, and 
evidence of study in special education and/or inclusion (students 
without this evidence will be required to complete such a course 
during their M.Ed.). 

2. Applicants must have one year of flill-time, satisfactory K-12 teach- 
ing experience in public or private schools. (All other cases will be 
considered by the department on an individual basis.) 

3. An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is also required. (If an 
applicant possesses a master's degree, the GPA requirement applies 
to that degree.) 

Degree Requirements 

1. Satisfactory completion of the curriculum as given below. Both 
the selection and the sequence of courses should be determined 
in consultation with an appointed adviser. Workshop credits 
(EDE 580-589) are not permitted. Up to sk credits of "Special 
Topics" courses (EDE 591-593), within an area of focused 
inquiry, may be counted towards the degree. 

2. A cumulative GPA ofat least 3.0. 

3. Development of a professional portfolio. (The portfolio will be for- 
mally evaluated during EDE 571.) 

4. Completion of a classroom-based inquiry project in EDE 611. 

Curriculum 36 semester hours 

I. Initial Courses 6 semester hours 
To be taken during first 15 hours of study 

EDE 532 and 554 

II. Intermediate Courses 9 semester hours 
EDE 556, EDE 583, and EDR 535 

III. Area of Focused Inquiry 12 semester hours 
Students are to complete a 12-credit area of focused inquiry, stu- 
dents should confer with the assigned adviser to determine an 
appropriate and desirable area of focused inquiry. 

Areas currently include the following: 

• Culturally responsive education 

• Inclusion/special education 

• Literacy 

• Technology 

• Teaching English as a second language 

• Open area: Students are encouraged to propose their own focus 



areas based on personal interests and needs and available grad- 
uate-level offerings at West Chester Universit)'. These areas 
would be developed with faculty in the student's area of interest 
and approved by the elementar\' education graduate coordina- 
tor. Workshop credits may not be used to satisfy requirements 
for the area of focused inquiry. 
IV. Culminating Courses 9 semester hours 

EDE 571 and 611 

Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study 

The certificate of advanced graduate study (C AGS) is designed for 
students who already possess a master's degree and who want to 
expand their knowledge in a given area, or to broaden it to include 
other areas. Such students normally do not wish to undertake a doc- 
toral program but, at the same time, prefer the guidance and struc- 
ture offered bv a program such as the CAGS. 

Adnussion Requirements 

A student who wishes to pursue the CAGS must: 

1. Possess a master's degree from an accredited institution. 

2. Have attained a minimum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 in a 
master's degree program. 

3. Present three professional letters of recommendation. 
Acceptance for study toward the CAGS will be determined by the 
faculty of the Department of Elementary Education. However, prior 
to formal admission to the program, the student is required to 
develop a proposed plan of study with the supervising committee 
(consisting of the major adviser and one additional member) that 
has been appointed by the department chairperson or a designee. 

Program of Study 

A minimum of 30 semester hours earned beyond the master's 
degree is required. Students accepted into the program will pursue a 
plan of study to meet their individual needs. Plans will be developed 
with the major adviser and be approved by the student's supervising 
committee. Previous course work taken wiU be considered in the 
development of the student's program. Also, the suggested program 
will be presented to the departmental graduate committee for 
approval. Course work may be arranged as follows: 

I. Area of Specialization 18-24 semester hours 
(Examples: early childhood education, elementary education — 
general, language arts, mathematics, reading, science, social studies, 
gifted education) 

Programs will be individually tailored for each student by an adviser. 

II. Course Work in Complementary Areas 0-6 semester hours 
m Seminar in Research 3 semester hours 
IV. Research Report 3 semester hours 

Transfer Credits 

A maximum of six hours of approved transfer credit earned after the 
master's degree may be applied to the proposed program if the 
courses complement the area of specialization and it the credits were 
earned within a period of three years before entering this program. 

Certificate of Approval 

Successful completion of the program requires that the student: 

1 . Achieves a minimum GPA of 3.25 in all course work in the area 
of speci;Jization and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in all course work 
taken outside the College of Education. 

2. Successfully passes an oral examination in the area ot specializa- 
tion, as well as completes a research report. All requirements, 
including the research report, must be completed before the stu- 
dent will he allowed to take the oral examination. 

3. Meets all program requirements. 

4. Completes the program within six years following the date of 
the first enrollment. 



I''ii>;lisl) 



COURSK DI.SCRIPriONS 
IXKMKN lAKY KOUCAIION 

Symbol: KDK 

520 Writing Development and Instruction (3) 

Strategics tor tciichin^ the hui^agc arts. 
Methods, materials, and resources for organizing 
creative programs in school settings. This course is 
crosslisted as F.DR 520. 

526 Professional Dimensions of Teaching and 
Learning (3) An introduction to the dimensions 
ot teaching and learning in the context of the cul- 
turally responsive, elementary classroom. 
Observations and supervised experiences in field- 
based settings are required. 

530 Social Studies in Elementary Education (3) 
Interdisciplinary and niulticulniral strategies for 
developing concepts, skills, and values in the social 
studies prograin. 

532 Teaching and Learning: Linking Theory to 
Practice (3) This course is intended to help teach- 
ers connect knowledge ot curriculum design and 
learning theor)' with the development of culturally 
responsive curriculum and effective classroom 
practice. 

533 Social Studies and Health Education in the 
Elementary School (3) An interdisciplinary 
overviev^■ ot the content, context, purpose, and 
strategies for teaching history, geography, the 
social sciences, and health education in the ele- 
mentary classroom. National, state, and local stan- 
dards are used as frameworks for exploration. 

543 Creative Expression in the Elementary 
School (3) Theories and techniques to promote 
creative thinking and enhance children's creative 
potential in all areas of the school curriculum. 

544 Integrating Creativity and the Arts Across 
the Curriculum (3) .'\n examination of creativity 
theor\' and the arts disciplines, with emphases on 
the purposes and processes of integrating arts 
skills and knowledge across the elementary cur- 
riculum. 

548 Curriculum Theory and Trends in Elemen- 
tary Education (3) Theoretic^il frameworks of ele- 
mentary school curricula; curriculum development 
and change. To be taken after 15 hours of work. 

549 Theory and Trends in the Language Arts (3) 
Analysis and evaluation ot language arts programs, 
including reading in the modern elementary 



scliool. l'Rt:ilEQ: EDE 548. This course is 
crosslisted as EDR 549. 

551 Child and Adolescent Behavior 1 (3) Social, 
intellectual, emotion;d, physical, and moral aspects 
ot child and adolescent behavior Emphasis on per- 
sonal development of the teacher as a prerequisite 
to understanding children in the elementary school. 

552 The Middle School Child (3) Development, 
behavior, and specific needs during late childhood 
and early adolescence (10-15 years); applies to 
working with children in the middle school. PRE- 
REQ;^ Recent course in child/human development. 

553 Child and Adolescent Behavior 11 (3) 
Review of principles of growth and development. 
Theories of personality development; clues to 
identifying children with problems; therapies 
applicable to elementary and adolescent school 
children. Case study may be required. PREREQ; 
A recent course in child development and comple- 
tion ot 15 hours of course work. 

554 The Reflective Teacher: Examining Cultural 
Paradigms in the Contemporary Classroom (3) 
An investigation ot the origins of popular, person- 
al, and theoretical constructions of teaching and 
learning processes and how these constructions 
influence contemporary practice. 

555 The Classroom as Content and Context for 
Learning (3) Exploration and application of mod- 
els and theories to facilitate analysis of the class- 
room with emphases on the complex intra- and 
interpersonal processes that determine the person- 
al, social, and ecological contexts for learning. 

556 Human Development (3) Study of cross-cul- 
turally evolving perspectives on healthy develop- 
mental processes in children and adults. 
Application of findings to interaction between 
teachers and learners within the contexts of family, 
school, and community. PREREQ: EDE 554. 

557 The Foundations of Cooperative Learning 
(3) Exploration of various theories, models, and . 
strategies for cooperative learning, with the goal of 
systematic implementation into all areas of the 
school curriculum. 

560 Cultxu^y Responsive Education (3) This 
course is designed to help educators address issues 
related to diversity in the classroom. Students will 
explore their own cultural self idenrity and the 
importance of valuing multiple perspectives in 



preparing and implementing instruction. 

562 IntegratingThinldng Skills into the 
Curriculum (3) Provides the rationale and theory 
base for including thinking skills in instructional 
strategies. Opportunities to apply thinking strategies 
to curricula are provided through models of teaching. 
565 Effective Classroom Management (3) 
Dynamics of interpersonal relations in planning 
and facilitating cla.ssroom instruction. 

570 Supervision in the Elementary School (3) 
Concepts and practices in supervision of teachers, 
student teachers, and aides. PREREQ^ Course work 
in elementary education and child development. 

571 Educational Change: A Systemic View (3) 
Exploration ot theories and models of educational 
change, with emphases on systems thinking and 
the central role of the teacher in the change 
process. PREREQ: EDE 532, 554, 556; EDF 
583; EDR 5.35. 

580-589 Workshops in Elementary Education 
(1-6) Additional course numbers will be assigned 
as new areas of study are announced. Credits vary. 
The series presently includes: 
580 Workshop in Elementary Education 
583 Workshop in Creativity 

585 Workshop in Language Arts 

586 Workshop in Curriculum Enrichment 

588 Workshop in Gifted and Talented 

589 Workshop in Humanizing Teaching and 
Learning 

590 Independent Study (1) Enrollment by per- 
mission only; number of credits determined bv 
instructor. 

591-593 Special Topics (1-3) 

598 Workshop in Elementary Education (3) 

600 Research Report (1-2) 

610 Thesis (4-6) 

611 Teacher as Classroom Researcher (6) This 
course explores the role of classroom research in 
the professional life of the teacher. With the goal 
of informing personal practice and coUegial dis- 
course, participants review existing literature, 
design and carry out an investigation in their own 
setting, and report results to professional col- 
leagues. PREREQ: EDE 532, 535, 554, 556, 571; 
EDF 583. 



English 



541/531 Main HaU 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2745/436-2822 

Dr. Wanko, Chairperson 

Dr. Fletcher, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Michael W. Brooks, Ph.D., University of Toronto 

T. Obinkaram Echewa, Ph.D., Syracuse University 

Andrea Fishman, Ph.D.. University of Pennsylvania 

Paul D. Green, Ph.D., Harvard University 

Elizabeth Liirsen, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

Paul L. Maltby, Ph.D., Sussex University 



Garrett Molholt, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Kostas MyTsiades, Ph.D., Indiana University 
Linda M)Tsiades, Ph.D., Indiana University 
Michael A. Peich, M.A., University of Pennsylvania 
Geetha Ramanathan, Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Judith Scheffler, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
C.James Trotman, Ed.D., Columbia University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Christian K. Awuyah, Ph.D., University of Alberta 

Robert P. Fletcher, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

Dennis Godfrey, Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Anne F. Herzog, Ph.D., Rutgers University 

Jane E.Jeffrey, Ph.D., Iowa University 



English 



Deidrt A. Johnson, Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

William Lalicker, Ph.D., University of Washington 

Cheryl L. Micheau, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

JohnT. Newcomb, Ph.D., Duke University 

Katherine Northrop, M.F.A., University of Iowa 

Luanne Smith, M.F.A., Pennsylvania State University 

Christopher J. Teutsch, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

Victoria Tischio, Ph.D., State University of New York -Albany 

Carla Vcrderame, Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Cherv'l L. Wanko, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

John W. Ward, Ph.D., University of Delaware 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Hannah Ashley, Ph.D., Temple University 

Jen Bacon, Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Charles Bauerlein, M.A., Pennsylvania State University 

Mar)' Buckelew, Ph.D., University of New Mexico 

Juanita R. Comfort, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

Margaret Ervin, Ph.D., University of Albany, State University of 

New York 
Karen Fitts, Ph.D., Texas Christian University 
John Hanson, Ph.D., Florida State University 
Linda Huff, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Seth Kahn, Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Rodney Mader, Ph.D., Temple University 
Merr)' Perry, Ph.D., University of South Florida 
Patricia A. Pflieger, Ph.D., University of Minnesota 
Cherise Pollard, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Timothy Ray, Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 
Eleanor Shevlin, Ph.D., University of Maryland 
Carolyn Sorisio, Ph.D., Temple University 
K. Hyoejin Yoon, Ph.D., State University of New York- Albany 

INSTRUCTOR 

Elizabeth Nollen, Ph.D., Indiana University 

Program of Study 

The Department of English offers the master of arts in English. 
The master of arts permits the student to attain a number of goals. 
It furthers scholarship and learning in literature, language, and writ- 
ing, providing the student with experience in critical reading and 
writing skills; the M.A. may be a preface to doctoral study or pro- 
vide a foundation for teaching in high schools, community, or junior 
colleges. The Department of English also participates in an inter- 
disciplinary program leading to the master of arts in teaching 
English as a second language. (See the section "Teaching English as 
a Second Language," pages 100-101.) 

In addition, the Department of English welcomes students who 
wish to take courses for professional growth and provides assistance 
and advice to post-baccalaureate students wishing to acquire sec- 
ondary teaching certification in English. 

Admission Requirements 

The applicant to the M.A. program in English must (1) meet the 
general requirements for admission to degree study at West Chester 
University, (2) submit a 5-6 page writing sample discussing a piece 
of literature (not creative works, news releases, or journalistic 
reports); (3) satisfy other departmental admission requirements 
established in consultation with the graduate coordinator; (4) take 
additional graduate and/or undergraduate courses when considered 
necessary. Normally, applicants who do not have a strong under- 
graduate record in English literature may be expected to take addi- 
tional courses for fiall admission into the M.A. program in English. 
The applicant seeking secondary English certification only must apply 
through the Office of Graduate Studies and Extended Education to 
the Department of Professional and Secondary Education and must 



ha\e the transcripts e\aluated by both the School ot Education and 
the Department of English. The general requirements for admission 
include items (1) and (2) listed under "Admission Requirements for 
Degree Students" found at the beginning of the Graduate Catalog. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN ENGLISH 

Both a thesis and a nonthesis option are available. 

Thesis Option Literature Track 33-36 semester hours 

I. Required 9-12 semester hours 
ENG 500 and ENG 501 (or ENG 501 and ENG 504 for the cre- 
ative writing concentration) are to be taken before the completion 
of 12 semester hours of graduate credit. (6) 

ENG 620 M.A. Essay (about 40 pages) to be completed at the 
end of course work under the direction of an adviser selected in con- 
sultation with the graduate coordinator. An oral defense of this essay 
also will be required. (3-6) 

II. Course Selection 24 semester hours 

In addition to ENG 500 or 504, 501, and 620, all students will take 
eight courses selected in consultation with the graduate coordinator 
according to the following plan: 

1. At least one course in British literature before 1660 (3) 

2. At least one course in British or American literature (including 
African- American) between 1660 and 1900 (3) 

3. At least one course in British or American literature (including 
African-American) between 1900 and 2000 (3) 

4. At least one course in noncanonical literatures, including com- 
parative literature, women's literature, African-American litera- 
ture. Native- American literature, and other literatures repre- 
senting cultural diversity (3) 

5. Four electives (12) 

Creative Writing Concentration 33-36 semester hours 

(within thesis option) 

I. Required 9-12 semester hours 
ENG 501 and ENG 504 (6) 

ENG 620 M.A. Essay is a portfolio of original fiction or poetry. (3-6) 

II. Course Selection 24 semester hours 

1. Four literature courses chosen from four different areas (12) 

2. Four courses chosen from among poetry and fiction 
workshops (12) 

Nonthesis Option 36 semester hours 

I. Required 6 semester hours 

ENG 500 and ENG 501 are to be taken before the completion 
of 12 semester hours of graduate credit. (6) 

II. Course Selection 30 semester hours 
In addition to ENG 500 and 501, all students will select ten courses 
in consultation with the graduate coordinator according to the fol- 
lowing plan: 

1. At least one course in literature before 1500 (3) 

2. At least one course in literature between 1500 and 1660 (3) 

3. At least one course in literature between 1660 and 1800 (3) 

4. At least one course in British or American literature between 
1800 and 1900(3) 

5. At least one course in British or American literature berween 
1900 and 2000 (3) 

6. Five electives (15) 
Additional requirements 

1 . At least one course must be taken in American literature 
(including African-American and Native-American). 

2. At least two courses must be in noncanonical topics (that is, 
material, literature, and culture not traditionally regarded as 
representing mainstream or "high" culture). 

Writing, Teaching, and Criticism Track 36 semester hours 
I. Writing: Composition and Rhetoric 6 semester hours 

Required: 

ENG 506 (3) 



Ilgilsll 



One course from the following composition 
and rhetoric electives (3) 
KNG 506, 508, 594, 596, 600, 617, 618, 619 
11. Teaching: Pennsylvania Writing and 6 semester hours 

Literature Project 
Required: 

FWP 502 (3) 

One course from the list of three-credit PAWLP 
courses at tlic end of the departmental course 
listings 
m. Criticism: Literature 6 semester hours 

Required: 

ENG 501 (3) 

One course from any literature electives from 
ENG 501 through 573, and 592, 593, and 615 
rV. Capstone Course 3 semester hours 

KNG 616 
V. Free Electives 15 semester hours 

These 15 credits may be taken in any ot the three main categories, 
above (I - III), or a student may substitute EDR 505 or EDR 
507 (offered bv the Department of Literacy) for one of the 
three-credit elective classes. No more than 12 semester hours 
(including the six in category II above) may be taken from a list 
of courses taught by PAWLP master teachers. 
VL "Noncanonical" Requirement 

One course in the program must be selected from the following 
"noncanonical" courses. This is not an additional course; it must 
occur within the program requirements listed above. 

In each M.A. option/track, one course may be a compatible course 
taken in another department. For more information concerning gradu- 
ate work in English, including course listings, see the Handbook for 
Graduate English Studies and Guidelines for Completing the MjI. Essay, 
available from the English graduate coordinator. 

Secondary English Certification Option 

Some students pursue certification for Pennsylvania teaching after 
they graduate with bachelor's degrees from West Chester or other 
universities. The Department ot English normally accepts equiva- 
lent courses from colleges or universities accredited in the United 
States or their equivalent from schools in other countries. Students 
seeking post-baccalaureate certification should consult with the 
graduate coordinator ot the Department of Enghsh to see which 
requirements they have already fulfilled in their undergraduate pro- 
gram and which they need to fulfill to get their teaching certificate. 
These students should also meet with the graduate coordinator of 
the Department of Enghsh to plan their academic progress and to 
ensure they arc keeping up with requirements, and they should meet 
with an ad\'iser in the Department of Professional and Secondary 
Education for information on required education courses. Students 
pursuing post-baccalaureate certification must meet all requirements 
for tormal admission and student teaching. 



Required 

Two linguistics courses: 

1 . ENG 230 (or ENG 230, LIN/LEN 501 , 503, 512) 

2. ENG 331 (or ENG 575, LIN/LEN 504, 505) 

Two advnced methods courses: 

3. ENG 390 

4. ENG 392 

Nine advanced English courses ("advanced" means courses determined 
to be upper-level undergraduate or graduate courses. At West Chester, 
the courses that qualify' ore numbered in the 300s, 400s, 500s, or 600s.) 

5. A literary theory course 

6. A course in Enghsh hterature before 1660 

7. A course in Enghsh literature between 1660 and 1900 

8. A course in English literature after 1900 

9. A pre-20th century American literature course 

10. A 20th-century American literature course 

11. A course in hterature for young adults 

12. A course in world literature 

13. A Department of Enghsh elective 

Notes: 

• Students must attain a GPA of 2.8 to student teach and 
have a GPA of 3.0 at the conclusion of their program. 

• Students should be formally admitted to the teacher certifi- 
cation program and should have taken ENG 230, ENG 331, 
EDM 300, EDP 351, and EDS 306 before taking the 
advanced methods courses (ENG 390, ENG 392). "Formal 
admission" means that students have met the requirements 
to do advanced study in a teacher education program. To be 
formally admitted, students must pass all their Pra.xis I 
(PPST) tests, earned at least 48 college credits (including 
three in writing, three in literature, and six in math), attained 
the required GPA (usually 2.8), and passed the Department 
of English's test of writing competency. Then they need to 
apply for formal admission at the College of Education. 

• The Department of English's test of writing competency is 
offered once in the fall and once in the spring. It is the stu- 
dent's responsibility to find out when the test is given and 
to make arrangements for attendance. 

• Students must submit a successful writing portfolio before 
student teaching. 

• Many of these classes are offered during the day and during 
the fall and spring semesters only, especially the advanced 
methods courses. 

• Students should contact the Department of Professional 
and Secondary Education to be properly advised about edu- 
cation courses. 

For more information concerning secondary English certification 
for post-baccalaureate students, contact the Department of English 
graduate coordinator. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ENGLISH 

Symbol: ENG 

GENERAL TOPICS AND THEORY 

500 Introduction to the Profession (.3) .■\n intro- 
duction to the methods ;ind materi;ils ot research 
used by scholars ot" English and American literature. 
An introduction to current issues and debates in the 
profession and to the history of the profession. 

501 Literary Theory (3) Study of various meth- 
ods of literan.- theory and analysis; the application 
of these methods to specific works of literature. 



502 History of Critjcism (3) A historical study of 
literary criticism and aesthetic theory from Plato 
and Aristotle to the present. 
505 Queer Theory (3) Participants in this course 
will read some of the major texts in the emergent 
fields of cultural criticism kno>vn as Queer Theory, 
which draws from various strains of post-struc- 
turalism, such as feminism, deconstruction, race 
studies, and post -colonial and psychoanalytic the- 
ory, in order to examine ideas about gender and 
scxualitT.' as they are represented in many t>pes ot 
cultural products. 

507 Literature Seminar (3) Variable topics 
announced each time the course is offered. 



ENGLISH LITERATURE 

517 Beowulf (3) .\n analysis ot the fiill poem in 
Old English. Emphasis on the artistic, linguistic, and 
historic values. PREREQ;^ ENG 584 or equivalent 

518 Chaucer (3) A study of the Canterbury Tales 
and Troilus and Criseyde. 

519 16th-century Poetry and Prose (3) A survey of 
the major poetry and prose written in England dur- 
ing the Tudor period from Skelton to Shakespeare. 

520 Spenser and Milton (3) The major works of 
Spenser and Milton studied in relation to the 
intellectual cUmate of the Renaissance. Emphasis 
on The Faerie Queene and Paradise Lost. 



English 



521 Major Renaissance Writers (3) An in-dcpih 
study ot" major figures in the Renaissance. Intellectual 
background and literarT,- influences. Variable topics. 

522 English Drama to 1642 (3) A survey of English 
drama (exclusive of Shakespeare) from its medieval 
beginnings to the closing of the theatres in 1642. 

523 Shakespeare's Sisters (3) Poetry, prose, and 
drama hv Renaissance women writers. Includes 
EUizaheth 1, Mar)- Wroth, Elizabeth Cary, Amelia 
Lanier, Kathcrine Philips, Bathsua Makin, and others. 
Topics addressed Include women's education, attacks 
on and defenses ot womankind, love poctr)' by men 
and women, heroic women, and "a woman's place." 

525 Shakespeare's Tragedies and Histories (3) 
Histories and tragedies read with analysis ot dra- 
matic and poetic ctTects. 

526 Shakespeare's Comedies and Poems (3) Tlie 
comedies analyzed. The poems read in relation to 
Shakespeare's developing dramatic and poetic power. 

527 17th-century Poetry and Prose (3) An in- 
depth study of the major poets and prose writers 
from Donne to Milton. 

529 18th-century Poetry and Prose (3) A study 
of the literature of the era, with emphasis on the 
cultural context, aesthetic theory, and the evolu- 
tion of poetic techniques. 

530 Restoration and ISth-Century Drama (3) 
Critical history of the British drama from the re- 
opening of the theatres to Sheridan. Major play- 
wrights and study of theatre history. 

531 ISth-Century British Novel (3) A study of 
the rise of the novel and its development in the 
18th century Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, 
Smollett, and Sterne. 

533 Romantic Poetry and Prose (3) The poetr)- 
and prose ot the early 19th centur)' with emphasis 
on the five major poets (Wordsworth, Coleridge, 
Byron, Shelley, and Keats) and three major essay- 
ists (Lamb, Hazlitt, and De Quincey). 

534 Victorian Poetry (3) A study of Tennyson, 
Browning, .'Vrnold, I lopkins, Swinburne, and Mardy. 

535 Culture and Society in the 19th Century (3) 
A study of Victorian literature against its social 
and intellectual background. 

536 19th-century British Novel (3) The British 
novel trom Scott to Hardy. 

537 20th-century British Novel (3) A study of 
the British novel trom 1914 to the present. 

538 20th-century British Poetry (3) A compre- 
hensive study of the major British poets from 
1890 to the present. 

539 Major 20th-century Irish Writers (3) A 
comprehensive study of significant Irish writers of 
the 20th century: Yeats, Joyce, O'Casey, Synge, 
O'Connor, O'Faolain, Beckett, and Shaw. 

540 Joyce and Beckett (3) Detailed critical analysis 
of Joyce's Duhlinm, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young 
Man, Exiles, and Ulysses; Beckett's drama and novels. 

541 20th-century Drama (3) Principal British 
and American playwrights. 

^ 544 Seminar in English Literature (3) Topic 
announced when otfef-cd. 

545 Medieval Women's Culture (3) This course 
studies writings by medieval women and their con- 
tribution to the development of medieval culture. 

AMERICAN LITERATURE 

♦ 547 American Literary Movements (3) Major 
movements in the development of American liter- 
ature. Influence of leading writers on literary con- 
cepts, trends, and critical dicta. Topics announced 
when offered. 



548 Early ^Vmerican Literature (3) Studies in 
earl)' American literature and culture. For exam- 
ple, "contact zones," spiritual narratives, belle-let- 
trism, the revolutionary public sphere. 

549 19th-century American Literature (3) An 
investigation of 19th-century literature and its cul- 
tural context. For example, Romantic writers and 
reform movements, realism and reconstruction. 

551 Literature and Culture in 20th-century 
America (3) Variable topics. For example. Natural- 
ism, Realism, Modernism, Post-Modernism, 
Subaltern Writing. 

552 Twentieth Century Native American 
Literature (3) This course investigates the Native 
American novel and the struggle ot Native 
Americans for self-representation. 

557 Major 20th-century American Poets (3) A 
close study of several major, modem American poets. 

558 20th-century American Writers (3) One or 
more major prose writers and literary movements 
from 1900 to the present. 

562 Modern African-American Literature (3) 
An intensive study in themes and trends in mod- 
ern African- American literature. 

563 African-American Women Writers in America 
(3) Writings fi-om the ColoniiJ period to the present. 
A survey ot the forms of expression used by these 
writers and the themes of gender, race, and class that 
challenge and redefine the image of women in an 
American and Afi-ican- American context. 

♦ 564 Seminar in American Literature (3) 
Variable topics announced when offered. 

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE 

♦ 565 Comparative Literature Seminar (3) 

Studies in international, literary, and/or culwral 
relations; the characteristics and relationships of 
literary themes, types, and genres. Topics 
announced when offered. 

566 Comparative Literature: The Greek Myths 
(3) The role of Greek myths and their treatment 
in Western literature. 

568 20th-century Women Poets (3) The study 
of a significant number of modern women poets 
from Amy Lowell to Diane Wakoski. Discussion 
of commentary by women poets about the experi- 
ence of writing poetry. Although the emphasis is 
on English and American poets, representatives 
from other culwres will be included. 
571 Colonialism and the 20th-century Novel (3) 
An examination of the relationship of the coloniitlist 
theme and modernist tccbniijues in the novel. 
573 Literature of the Holocaust (3) Phe central 
goals of this course are to help students under- 
stand, in some small way, the unimaginable hor- 
rors of the Holocaust, and by focusing on a limit- 
ed number of 1 lolocaust and post- Holocaust texts 
for critical discussion, to provide a voice for the 
millions silenced by the Nazis. 

LANGUAGE 

575 Structure of Modern English (3) A detailed 
analysis of the modern descriptive approach to the 
study of I'.nglish grammar and how it compares 
with the tradirional approach. 

576 Curriculum and Materials forTESL (3) 
Application of second language learning principles 
for the analysis, development, and implementation 
of ESL materials, learner assessment instruments, 
and curriculum. 

577 History of the English Language (3) Review 
of the major influences on the development ot the 
English language. PREREQ; LIN 501 or LIN 503. 



578 Modern English (3) A study of the develop- 
ment ot the EngUsh language from 1450 to the 
present (exclusive ot American Enghsh). 

579 Studies in American English (3) Historical 
processes in the development of American and 
British English. Regional and social dialects of 
American EngUsh. Usage and sociolinguistics. 

580 English Language Workshop (1-4) Work- 
shop to survey recent developments and newer 
concepts in English linguistics for teachers. 
Variahle structure and credit by arrangement with 
individual school districts. 

582 Sodolinguistic Issues in ESL/Second 
Language Education (3) Introduction to social, his- 
torical, legal, and cultural issues influencing minority 
communities, schools, and homes. Introduction to 
issues in bilingual education and language programs 
for immigrants around the world. Crosslisted as 
LAN 582. PREREQ: UN 501. 

583 Second Language Acquisition (SLA) (3) 
Introduction to key issues in SLA research and 
theory-. Analysis of SLA smdies in connection to 
second language teaching. Design of original 
mini-studv of second language learning. 
Crosshsted as LIN 583. PREREQ: LIN 501. 

584 Old En^sh Language and Literature (3) An 
introductory study of the language through a reading 
of selected religious and secular poetry and prose. 

585 Middle English Language and Literature 
(3) An introductory study of the language (1150- 
1450) through a reading of selected texts (exclu- 
sive of Chaucer). 

♦ 589 Language Seminar (3) Studies in English 
language and linguistics. Topics announced when 
offered. PREREQ: LIN 501 or the equivalent. 

♦ 590 Independent Study (1-3) Research proj- 
ects, reports, and specialized readings. PREREQ; 
Approval of instructor and coordinator of English 
graduate studies. 

612 Assessment of ESL/Second Language 
Students (3) Selection, evaluation, adaptation, and 
creation of assessment instruments for ESL/sec- 
ond language students. Practice administering 
tests and interpreting results. Overview of issues in 
assessing second language students. Crosslisted as 
LAN 612. PREREQ: LIN 501. 

TEACHING SKILLS 

506 Critical Pedagogies and Literacies (3) This 
course introduces students to two complementary 
bodies of literature: critical literacy and critical 
pedagogy. Students will analyze the educational 
system's role in maintaining or challenging diverse 
values, policies, and interests. To do so, students 
will ask questions about what we teach, how we 
teach, who we teach, and who we are as teachers: 
questions designed to frame the educational sys- 
tem socially, politically, and institutionally. 

591 Modern Techniques for the Teaching of 
English (3) Techniques of teaching language arts, 
composition, and literature in the secondary 
school. Practice in planning and designing units 
and courses of study. Exploration into the latest 
research in teaching English. 

592 Literature for the Elementary School (3) 
The content and approach of the literature pro- 
gram in the elementary school. 

593 Literature for the Secondary School (3) An 
examination of the literary interests ot the second- 
ary school student. A discussion of the works of 
major writers who appeal to the teenage student. 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Kn^lisli 



COMPOSITION AND RHKTORIC 

Please note tliat tlic composition ami rhetoric 
concentration is not currently available. 

♦ 508 Writing Seminar (3) Kxperience in non- 
fiction prose writing; discussion and development 
of major projects. 

594 Directed Studies in Composition and Rheto- 
ric (3) Ofters students systematic guidance and 
instruction in a specially formulated project involv- 
ing scholarly or empirical research in composition. 

595 Teaching Composition (3) A survey of devel- 
opments and research in composition. Focus on the 
writing process, grading and c\".Juation, case 
approaches to writing assignments, writing across the 
curriculum, and remedial and developmental writing. 

596 Composition and Rhetoric (3) Survey of 
rhetoric and composition theory. Frequent practice 
in writing. 

600 Tutoring Composition (3) llieory and practice 
of teaching basic v\Titing in the tutoring environment. 

617 Writing Diverse Discourses in the 
Classroom (3) This course will take up theories 
and practices of cultural diversities in written class- 
room discourses. Reading assignments cover theo- 
ries of representation and examples of classroom 
pedagogies and research, all of which offer various 
ways to think about diversity in the classroom and 
the rich, varied discourses that develop from it. 
lndividu;il research and writing projects will utilize 
ethnographic and teacher research methods to look 
at issues of diversin,- in the written discourses of 
the classroom in which we piu'ticipatc as either 
teachers or students. Other writing assignments 
will include memoir and journal writing. 

618 The Autobiographical Presence: Discussing 
the Writer and the Genre (3) This course exam- 
ines the genre of autobiography and its role as 
contemporary literature. It locates autobiographies 
and their uses in the writer's own times and lives. 

619 Cultural Studies: Pedagogy and Politics in 
English (3) Cultur.il studies ask us to consider 
carefully the relationships among people interpret- 
ing te.xts, people producing texts, and the cultural 
contexts in which we find texts. This course will 
introduce students to cultural studies as a frame- 
work for the critical interpretation ot cultural 
texts, as a philosophical basis for teaching, and as 
an object of study in its own right. 

CREATIVE WRITING 

504 Methods and Materials of Publishing (3) 

This course is designed to familiarize graduate 
students with the history of the book and to pro- 
vide them with the opportunity to gain practical 
experience in book production. 

♦ 509 Writing Seminar in the Novel I (3) A 
course in the writing and preparing of book- 
length manuscripts (novels, novellas, and "nonfic- 
tional" novels) with the intention of submission 
for publication. I'Mso includes coverage of fictional 
aspects and techniques used in writing memoirs, 
biography, and current histon'. 

♦ 510 Writing Seminar in the Novel II (3) A 
continuation of F,NG 509. 

♦ 601 Creative Writing Seminar (3) A specialized 
writing seminar. Topics announced when offered. 
Longer prose works, short story, fantasy/science fic- 
tion, narrative verse, Ijtic/meditative verse, etc. A 
portfolio is required at the end of the course. 

♦ 602 Creative Writing: Directed Studies (3) A 
course of individual stud\" for students who have 
completed two workshops in a single genre. 
Concentrated work in a special poetry or prose topic. 



♦ 605 Poetry Workshop I (3) Experience in writ- 
ing various types of poetry: traditional forms, nar- 
rative, lyric/meditative, etc. Readings in traditional 
and contemporary poetry and poetics. A final 
portfolio required. 

♦ 606 Poetry Workshop II (3) Extended work in 
pocfic forms with additional emphasis on contem- 
porary poetry in translation. A critical paper on 
contemporary poetry and poetics and a completed 
portfolio are required. 

♦ 608 Short Story Workshop I (3) Techniques of 
composing the short story with emphasis on its 
elements of form: point of view, diction, character- 
ization, and dialogue. Readings in traditional and 
contemporary criticism and short stories. 
Completed portfolio of revised works is required. 

♦ 609 Short Story Workshop II (3) Extended 
work in the short story form with opportunities 
for exploring more experimental forms of short 
fiction. Additional readings in short fiction and 
criticism. A critical paper on a contemporary short 
story writer is required. 

RESEARCH AND SPECIAL TOPICS 

♦ 615 Special Topics (3) Variable topics, usually 
interdisciplinary, incorporating issues related to lit- 
erary fields, genres, historical periods, and theoret- 
ical approaches. 

616 Capstone Research Seminar (3) Research 
class in which students design independent 
research projects derived from their prior interests, 
expertise, and course work in areas of writing, 
teaching, and criticism. Class includes instruction 
in research methodologies and collaborative cri- 
tiquing and workshopping. 

M.A. ESSAY 

♦ 620 M j\. Essay (3) Required final extended 
paper (about 40 pages) written under the direction ot 
an adviser. Further details aviiUable in the Graduate 
English Studies Handbook. Oral defense required. 

SPECIAL PROGRAM 
PENNSYLVANIA WRITING AND 
LITERATURE PROJECT (A National 
Writing Project Site) 

Symbol: PWP 

The courses described below are intended to be 
taken by teaching professionals who seek to 
enhance their wrinng and literature instruction 
while earning graduate credit. They are part of the 
English master's degree in writing, teaching, and 
criticism. They may also be taken by elementary- 
grade teachers working toward recognition as an 
English language arts specialist, by middle school 
teachers working toward their Praxis test in English 
language arts to meet the requirements of "No 
Child Left Behind" legislation, and by secondary 
teachers or elementary teachers who want to earn a 
certificate in teaching writing and literature. 
NOTE: ^Vll PWP courses require ad\'isement 
and permission of the project director or associ- 
ate director, and the instructor. 

♦ 501 The Writing Process (1) A practical inttoduction 
to the writing process approach to teaching writing. 

♦ 502 Strategies for Teaching Writing: Teachers 
as Writers (3) The best teachers of writing are 
writers themselves. This basic course helps partici- 
pants understand the writing process from the 
inside, prodding experience with all phases of the 
writing process and all teaching strategies that 
support best-practice instruction. It also encour- 
ages practitioners to pubhsh professionally. 

♦ 503 Strategies for Teaching Writing II: 



Writing in the Domains (3) Ihis course explores 
the domains of the Pennsylvania PSSA Writing 
Scoring Guide and provides practical strategies for 
linking writing process and writing workshop 
instruction to the PSSA domains and the 
Pennsylvania standards. 

♦ 504 Holistic Assessment of Writing (1) 
Theory and practice of rapid and reliable assess- 
ment of large numbers of writing samples as used 
in schools and colleges. 

♦ 505 Wriring in the Content Areas (1) 
Participants will explore ways of motivating stu- 
dents to write about academic areas, design effec- 
tive assignments, and use writing process methods 
to improve learning in all subjects. Topics include 
learning-centered writing, evaluation, and class- 
room management of writing. 

♦ 506 Computers and Writing (Beginning) (1) 
Computer applications at all stages of the writing 
process. Basic awareness, demonstrations, and 
hands-on experience will be emphasized. 

♦ 508 Computers and Wriring (3) This course 
explores all the technological approaches to writ- 
ing instruction, including a combination of class- 
room instruction and online hours. Participants 
actually take parts of this course online so they can 
experience this mode of learning themselves. 

♦ 510 Writing, Reading, and Talking Across the 
Curriculum: The Pennsylvania Literacy 
Framework (3) This course explores the theory 
and practical application of Pennsylvania's new 
language arts curriculum document to improve 
learning at all levels in all content areas through 
writing, reading, and speaking. 

♦ 511 Writing Assessment (3) This course 
explores large- and small-scale writing assessment 
strategies, both summative and formative. Topics 
covered include the Pennsylvania PSSA writing 
domain approach, holistic assessment, portfolio 
assessment, responding to writing, and developing 
writing assessment systems. 

♦ 512 Teacher Research Seminar (3) Participants 
in this course explore self-selected topics related to 
hteracy learning through a variety of practitioner 
research strategies, including qualitative methods 
of data collection and analysis. Special topics sec- 
tions of this course may also be available. 

♦ 513 Pennsylvania Literacy Framework 
Seminar (3) Topics of this advanced course in 
writing, reading, and thinking across the curricu- 
lum vary. They may include visualizing words and 
worlds; reading in the secondary content areas; 
creativity and hteracy or other PLF-related topics. 

♦ 515 Workshop in Administering Writing 
Programs (1) Creating and maintaining successftd 
writing and language arts programs. 

♦ 517 Workshop in Wriring Assessment (1) 
Different assessment models and their relation to 
instruction, with information from the Pennsyl- 
vania Writing Assessment. 

♦ 520 Strategies for Teaching Literature (3) 
This course focuses on instructional practices that 
reflect current theories and approaches to teaching 
and using all kinds of hterature in the classroom, 
K-12. A special section of this course, strategies 
for teaching reading in the literature classroom, is 
available for secondary English teachers only. 

♦ 521 Seminar in Teaching Literature (3) Topics 
of this course announced as offered. 

♦ 522 Seminar in Literatiu'e and Curriculum 
Development (3) The general section of this semi- 



♦ This course mav be taken 



again 



for credit. 



E^t Foreign Languages 



nar tocu:>cs on literature available tor curriculum 
development, K-12, and approaches for integrating 
and teaching that literature. Emphasis on issues of 
race, gender, ethnicity, class, and censorship. Special 
topics section ot this course available as announced. 
♦ 597 Seminar for Master Teachers (6) Offered 
orJy during the summer. Requires special application 
and interview for admission. Participants develop 
advanced skills in the teaching of writing, receive 



training as in-service teacher consulianib tor the 
National Writing Project, and become part of the 
NWP network in Pcnns\'lvania. 

♦ 599 Workshop in English (1-6) Topic varies. 
Each workshop will focus on specific issues and 
problems in the teaching of writing or literature 
and will introduce appropriate instructional mate- 
rials and techniques. 

♦ 520-521 Seminar for Master Teachers of 



Literature (6) Requires special application and 
interview for admission. Participants develop 
advanced skills in the teaching of literature, receive 
training as in-service teacher consultants for the 
National Writing Project, and become part of the 
N'WP network in Pennsylvania. Offered oijy dur- 
ing the summer. 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Foreign Languages 

109 Main Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2700 

Dr. Moscatelli, Chairperson 

Dr. Esplugas, Assistant Chairpersons 

Dr. Pauly, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

FRENCH 

PROFESSOR 

Rebecca Pauly, D.M.L., Middkbury College 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Anne-Marie Moscatelli, Ph.D., Eryn Mawr College 
Michel H. Sage, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

GERMAN 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Margarete Landwrehr, Ph.D., Harvard University 

LATIN 

PROFESSOR 

Erminio Braidotti, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

ASSOCL\TE PROFESSOR 

Anne-Marie Moscatelli, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

INSTRUCTOR 

John P. Rosso, M.A., University of Pennsylvania 

SPANISH 

PROFESSORS 

Erminio Braidotti, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Celia Esplugas, Ph.D., University of Toledo 
Stacey Schlau, Ph.D., City University of New York 
Jerome M. Williams, Ph.D., Yale University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Constance Garcia-Barrio, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Charles Grove, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Maria Van Liew, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego 
Andrea Varricchio, Ph.D., Temple University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Emilia Garofalo, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Foreign Languages offers two degree programs, 
one leading to the master of education in French or Spanish, and the 
other to the master of arts in French or Spanish. Admission to either 



program is through the Office of Graduate Studies and Extended 
Education. The GRE or the MAT is required for admission to 
either program. A placement test in the language will be required of 
all candidates, including native speakers. Applicants must have an 
undergraduate major in the language, or native fluency and a related 
four-year university' degree or the equivalent. Students in the master's 
programs may take up to six hours of 400-level courses in the lan- 
guage. Students may transfer in up to six semester hours trom anoth- 
er master's degree-granting institution. Candidates for either the 
M.A. or the M.Ed, are required to pass a comprehensive assessment 
in the foreign language, although the assessment for the M.Ed, is 
less comprehensive in scope than for the M.A. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN FRENCH OR SPANISH 

(36 semester hours) 

The M.Ed, program requires LAN 500, LAN 503, or LAN 401, and 
18 semester hours in the area of concentration. In both languages, the 
concentration may be designed to the student's particular interests and 
needs. The remaining 12 semester hours must be taken as graduate 
courses in profession;il and second;uy education (see pages 92-94). 
Currendy, the courses required for state secondary certification in for- 
eign languages include EDF 589, EDP 531, EDP 550, EDP 569, EDS 
505, and EDT 500. Thus, certification and the M.Ed, totals 54 hours 
(36 hours of courses plus sLx hours of certification courses bevond those 
needed for the M.Ed, and 12 hours of student teaching [EDS 411 and 
412]). All M.Ed, students should consult with the graduate adviser in 
the Department ot Professional and Secondary Education. 
Until further notice, no new students will be admitted to the 
M.Ed, in German or Latin. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN FRENCH OR SPANISH 

(30 semester hours) 

The M.A. programs in French or Spanish offer either a thesis or a 
nonthesis option, in addition to the required 21 semester hours of 
courses in the language. The master's in Spanish also requires SPA 
510. The thesis option in both French and Spanish is six semester 
hours of LAN 610. The nonthesis option in Spanish offers six 
semester hours of electives, which may be done in the area of con- 
centration or at the graduate level in a second foreign language. The 
nonthesis option in French includes nine hours of electives, in either 
LAN courses, the concentration, related areas of study, or at the 
graduate level in a second foreign language. 

The candidate for the M.A. must either pass a reading examination in a 
second foreign hinguage or take a 400- or 500-level course in that lan- 
guage, in addition to the 30 hours required. As an exception, students 
who demonstrate graduate level competence in two foreign languages 
may take additional graduate level courses in the second language. These 
courses are substituted for the electives. This dual course of study may be 
reflected in the exit assessment exam at the student's request. 



Foreign Languages 



COUUSK OKSCRII'TIONS 
COURSKS COMMON TO ALL 
l^NGUAGES 

Symbol; LAN 

500 Methods and Materials of Kesicarch in Second 
Language Education (3) Icclmiques ot rcscaah in 
foreign Ungviagc education, including sources, de- 
sign, interjirctation, eviduation, and reporting ot data. 

502 Second Languages in the Llementary 
School (3) Problems in teaching second languages 
in the elementiiry school. Curriculum design, 
bilingual education, classroom techniques, articu- 
lation, materials, and testing. Preferably, LIN 501 
or ec|uivalent should precede LAN 502. 

503 Techniques of Second Language Teaching 
(3) Advanced course in recent theoretical bases, 
methods tor teaching beginning and advanced lev- 
els, curriculum design, and evaluation. PREREQ^ 
LIN 501 or equivalent. 

504 Use of Media in Language Teaching (3) Role 
ot media in language instruction including the 
tape recorder, language laboratory, television, and 
the computer 

505 Introduction to Bilingual/Bicultural 
Education (3) Introduction to history, philosophy, 
current status, and tliturc directions of bilingual/ 
bicultural education. Survey of materials, tests, 
techniques, instructional processes, and instruc- 
tional patterns. Overview ot testing, placement, 
and pupil evaluation. 

♦ 51 1 Roman Civilization (3) Roman civihza- 
tion and its influences on Europe. 
525 Internship (3-12) A strucnired and super- 
vised experience tor students wishing to enhance 
their foreign language study directly in the work- 
place. Credits earned are based on time spent on 
the job. For approval, students must apply to the 
department chair or language .section coordinator 
527 Introduction to Applied Linguistics for 
Foreign Language Majors (3) An introduction to 
applied linguistics structured to meet the needs of 
foreign language majors and future world language 
teachers. Examples are drawn from the languages 
of expertise of the students. 

550 Seminar in Methods and Materials of 
Research in Language and Literature (3) The 

principal tools ot research in the field of foreign 
language and literature. Methods of conducting 
and reporting research, emphasizing correctness of 
form and mechanics of scholarly writing. 
560 Directed Studies (3) To provide an opportu- 
nity for students to pursue areas ot study not regu- 
larly provided by the department. Focus of course 
to be announced when otTered. 
580 Seminar in Second Language Education (1- 
4) Specialized workshop seminar devoted to a par- 
ticular area ot toreign language education. 
582 Sociolinguistic Issues in ESIVSecond 
Language Education (3) Introduction to social, his- 
torical, legal, and cultural issues influencing minority 
communities, schools, and homes. Introduction to 
issues in bilingual education and language programs 
for immigrants around the world. Crosslisted as 
ENG 582. PREREQ: UN 501. 
585 Institute in Second Language Education (4- 
8) In-depth study of a particular area of foreign lan- 
guage education. 

590 Independent Study (1-3) 
600 Research Report (1-2) 



610 Thesis (6) 

612 Assessment of ESL/Second Language 
Students (3) Selection, evaluation, adaptation, and 
creation of assessment instruments for ESL/sec- 
ond language students. Practice administering 
tests and interpreting results. Overview of issues in 
assessing second language students. Crosslisted as 
ENG 612. PREREQ: LIN 501. 
See also Linguistics (LIN) 

FRENCH 

Symbol: FRE 

501 Commercial French (3) A study of French 
economic and business systems, with extensive 
practice in business correspondence. 

510 French Theater (3) Principal French drama- 
tists anal)''/,ed against the social, political, literary, 
and critical backgrounds ot their age. 

511 Modernism in French Literature (3) Close 
consideration of some prime innovative texts of 
fiction, poetry, film, and polemic as manifestations 
of the spirit and aesthetic of modernism. 

512 French Narrative (3) A study of prose texts, 
their ethos, and their narrative techniques, from 
the epics and contes of the Middle Ages to the 
experimental works of the late 20th century. 

513 French Poetics (3) An intensive survey of 
French poetry, its theory and practice, using mod- 
els drawn from the whole tradition, from Villon to 
Bonnefoy. 

514 Contemporary France (3) A study of France 
since 1945, with emphasis on current events and 
social changes. 

515 French Civilization (3) A study of France 
since 1789, wdth emphasis on social, political, eco- 
nomic, and educationid institutions. 

516 Writing Literary Criticism: Theory and 
Practice (3) Study ot various fields of literarj' the- 
ory, including structuralism, semiotics, Marxism, 
narratology, psychoanalytic criticism, and decon- 
struction. Techniques ot textual interpretation. 

♦ 520-521-522 Topics in French Literature and 
Language (3) Course topics courses will var)' by 
semester and instructor, and may include titles such 
as genre studies, film study, women writers, fran- 
cophone writers, the study of literary periods or 
movements, and structural and applied linguistics. 
523 Translation Techniques (3) A theoretical and 
practical study of modes ot lexical and sMitactic 
transposition, from LI to neutral zone to L2. 
Extensive practical exercise in diverse types of 
translation. 

SPANISH 

Symbol: SPA 

510 Spanish Phonetics and Applied Linguistics 

(3) A study ot Spanish morphology, phonology, 
and syntax (sound, word, sentence formation). The 
structure of the language will be studied from a 
theoretical and practical perspective. 
512 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Stylistics 
(3) An informal, rapid review ot Spanish grammar, 
with emphasis on problems fundamental to the 
American classroom. Exercises include idiomatic 
expression, various levels of style, and translation. 
514 The Hispanic World (3) Major philosophical 
and artistic contributions of the Hispanic world to 
Western civilization. The social and economic 
institutions of the Hispanic world. 



520 Medieval and Renaissance Literature (3) 

Analysis ot major Spanish texts and authors from 
1 100-1500, including Mio Cid, la Cekstina, 
Alfonso X, Manriquc, Don Juan Manuel, Berceo, 
Encina, and Juan Ruiz. 

530 Spanish "Comedia" of the Golden Age (3) 
Survey of the comeJia before Lope de Vega; the 
contributions of Lope dc Vega; Tirso dc Molina 
and Ruiz dc Alarcon; the Baroque theatre of 
Calderon de la Barca. 

532 Spanish Literature of the Golden Age (3) 
Novel and poetry. Spanish literature of the 16th 
and 17th centuries: mysticism, poetry, novel. 

533 Cervantes (3) Life and works of Miguel 
Cervantes Saavedra: Novelas ejemplares, Ocho come- 
diasy otro entremeses. La Numamia, La Galatea, all 
of which lead to the study of the meaning, philoso- 
phy, and influence of Don Quixote. 

535 19th-century Spanish Literature (3) An 
analysis of the major movements of the century, 
including Romanticism, "Costumbrismo," 
Realism, and Naturalism. 

536 The Generation of 1898 (3) The revitalizing 
forces which took hold in the late 19th century, 
and a study of the works of Unamuno, Azorin, 
Menendez Pidal, Pio Baroja, Valle Inclan, 
Benaventc, Martinez Sierra, and Ruben Dario. 

537 20th-century Spanish Literature (3) 
Introduction to representative works of 20th-cen- 
tury Spanish literature. Authors studied include 
Arrabal, Cela, Dclibes, Lorca, Goytisolo, Matutc, 
Sender, and others. 

541 Colonial Latin American Literature (3) A 
study of colonial L.atin American literature within 
the context ot conquest and colonization, with 
emphasis on religious, historical, and literary 
aspects of the New World as seen through pri- 
mary authors and readings. 

542 Modern Latin American Literature (3) 
Spanish-American literature, thought, and culture 
as revealed in outstanding works representative of 
major authors and movements from the 
Independence to 1950 (including Romanticism, 
Modernism, Regionahsm, and avant garde). 

543 Contemporary Latin American Literature (3) 
A study ot major authors and literary movements in 
contemporary Latin America, including magical 
realism, theatre of the absurd, and poetic movements. 

544 Latin American Theatre (3) A study of the- 
atre as a reflection of social realities and of dramat- 
ic movements and techniques in Latin America. 
The cultural history of the Latin American stage 
also will be examined. 

545 The Latin American Novel (3) The develop- 
ment of the novel in Latin America. The colonial 
period, the period of independence, the romantic 
period; realism, modernism, criollismo, and natu- 
ralism. 

547 Hispanic Women Writers (3) An examina- 
tion of representative women authors and their 
prose, poetry, and theatre from the 1 7th century to 
the present in Spain and Spanish America. 
549 Masterpieces and Movements in Spanish 
Literature (3) A seminar on the development of 
Spanish thought and artistic expression through 
selected masterpieces of literature and art. 

♦ 556 Seminar I (3) 

♦ 557 Seminar II (3) 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



GeoCTuphv .ind PlaiiniriL; 



Geography and Planning 

103 Ruby Jones HaU 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2746 

Fax: 610-436-2889 

Web address: www.wcupa.edu/_academics/sch_sba.geo/ 

Dr. Welch, Chairperson and Coordinator of M.S.A. Regional 

Planning Concentration 

E-mail: jwelch@wcupa.edu 
Dr. Rcngert, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

E-mail: arengert@wcupa.edu • 

PROFESSORS 

James P. Lewandowski, Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Arlene C. Rengert, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
John C. Tachovsky, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Joan Welch, Ph.D., Boston University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Charles W. Grasscl, M.S., University of Pennsylvania 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

George W. Fasic, M.S., Columbia University, A.I.C.P. 

Programs of Study 

Tlie Department of Geography and Planning offers two master's 
degrees: 1) the master of arts in geography and 2) the master of sci- 
ence in administration, with a concentration in regional planning. 
The latter is an interdisciplinary degree described under "Master of 
Science in Administration" (see pages 29-31). 
The master of arts in geography is designed to develop skills and 
expertise in areas such as land planning and management, conserva- 
tion of resources, GIS analysis, and location of commerce and 
industry. It also prepares students for entrance into Ph.D. programs 
in geography, and in social studies education. The M.A. degree has 
thesis and nonthesis options. 

The professional grovrth program of study is for students who desire 
specific graduate courses but not a degree. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN GEOGRAPHY 

Admission to Program 

Applicants should submit transcripts of all undergraduate work, three 
letters of recommendation, a resume that indicates relevant work expe- 
rience, and a statement of career background and goals. GRE or other 
standardized scores are usefijJ in the admission process but are not 



required. The department welcomes qualified applicants who have no 
previous background in geography, although additional preliminary or 
concurrent work may be required. Admission is based on department 
evaluation ot course work taken for the baccalaureate degree and addi- 
tional course work, if any, in combination with the other criteria above. 

Curriculum 33 semester hours 



12 semester hours 



(up to) 6 semester hours 



Thesis Option 

1. Required Courses 

GEO 503, 509, 534, and 585 

2. Thesis (3 hours required) 
GEO 610 

3. Elective Courses 15 semester hours 
Selected under advisement from geography, geology, mathematics, 
statistics, computer science, environmental health, or other appro- 
priate disciplines. 

4. Oral examination in defense of thesis (required) 

Nonthesis Option 

1. Required Courses 18 semester hours 

GEO 503, 509, 534, 584, 585, and 600 

2. Elective Courses 15 semester hours 
Selected under advisement from geography, geology, mathematics, 
statistics, computer science, environmental health, or other appro- 
priate disciplines. 

MASTER OF SCIEINCE IN ADMINISTRATION 
Concentration in Regional Planning 

Admission to Program 

See "Master ot Science in Administration" listing, page 29. 

36 semester hours 
18 semester hours 



6 semester hours 



12 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Administration Core (required) 

.'^DM 501, 502, 503, 504. 505, 507 

II. Regional Planning Core (required) 

ADM 500, GEO 525 

III. Regional Planning Electives 

(selected under advisement), including 

ADM 600, 612 

GEO 502, 505, 506, 507, 509, 521, 524, 526, 

527, 530, 531, 534, 5.36, 584, 585, 590, and 615 
PSC 542 and 544 
rV. A written comprehensive exam is required. The examination will 
be based on a selected bibliography ot key works in the concentra- 
tion. The bibliography will be provided at the time the student is 
admitted to the program. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
GEOGRAPHY 

Symbol: GEO 

# 502 Topical Seminar (3) Special topics in 
geography ot" planning not offered under existing, 
regularly offered courses. 

503 Scminiu- in Modern Geography (3) A survey 
ot modern geographic research, with historical 
perspective. Attention is given to research 
methodology, and to the breadth of subfields and 
perspectives in the discipline. 

505 Planning Design (3) Methods and tech- 
niques ot planning design. Presentation of statisti- 
cal data in map form. PREREQ; Consent of 
instructor or department chair 

506 Seminar in Physical Geography (3) This 
course examines aspects of the physical environ- 
ment that must be considered when planning any 
site for urban, industrial, or suburban activity. 



507 Maps and Aerial Photographs (3) Designed 
to improve map and photo interpretation skills. 
Emphasis on increased understanding of U.S.G.S. 
quadrangles, and special-purpose statistical maps. 
509 Quantitative Methods (3) Fundamental sta- 
tistics, methods, and techniques applied to geo- 
graphic research and decision making, such as 
urban and regional planning. 
521 Suburbanization and I,and Development (3) 
Component systems and tiinctional operations ot 
urban/suburban communities, including ecological 
and demographic iispects. Emphasis on organization, 
development, change, and problems of communities. 

524 Population Processes (3) Characteristics and 
distribution of world populations are studied. The 
dynamic processes of population change (mortali- 
ty, fertility, and migration) are examined. 

525 Urban and Regional Planning (3) 
Application ot community-planning theories and 
methods to designated urban and regional systems. 



526 Metropolitan Systems and Problems (3) Ur- 

baniziition processes and problems; urban sj'stems in 
the avpanding metropolitan and regional setting; pre- 
sent and proposed efforts to solve urban problems. 

527 Planning Law and Organization (3) An 
insight into the role ot tederJ, state, and liKid gov- 
ernments in instituting, executing, and judicially 
reviewing laws and regulations pertaining to land 
uses. Emphasis on the legal organization ot the plan- 
ning process, particularly at the local level. Maior 
land-use ci>urt cases are presented and reviewed. 

530 Demographic Analysis (3) A course to devel- 
op skills in basic demographic research, emphasiz- 
ing the uses and limitations of data sources, and 
the understanding and interpretation of specific 
analytic methods for popiJation analysis. 

531 Transportation Planning (3) Transportation 
issues that tace todav's planners are studied, and 
various means of analysis demonstrated. Computer 
assignments use EMME/2 package. 



Geology and Astronomy 



534 Geographic Information Systems (3) i lie 

common principles and concepts ot Geographic 
Information Systems; examination of the theory 
and tools of spatial data analysis through specific 
applications. 

536 Environmental Planning (3) In-depth 
instruction on the concepts and tools of environ- 
ment:il planning which include landscape form 
and ftinction in planning. Applications to local 
and regional issues are stressed. 
540 Geography of the United States and Canada 
(3) .*\ region;il snidy ot the United States and 
Canada, emphasizing its physiciJ geography, settle- 
ment, agricultxirc, demography, and industrial activity'. 

544 Geography ofLatin America (3) Regional 
geograph\' ot Latin America: its phvsiciU base, settle- 
ment, agriculture, demography, and manufacturing. 

545 Geography of Europe (excluding the 
U.S.S.R.) (3) Regional study of Europe. 



Influences ot environmental factors, such as cli- 
mate, landforms, and soils on the economic, social, 
and political condition of European nations. 
4 572 Seminar in Resource Management (3) 
Applied research problem solving for resource 
management and environmental issues designed 
for an individual student or team-study basis. 

584 Applications of Geographic Information 
Systems (3) This course builds on GEO 534, ex- 
pands upon important technical concepts in greater 
detail, and explores a range ot CIS application areas. 
PREREQ^GEO 534 or permission of instructor 

585 Geography Field Methods (3) An advanced 
field course that includes urban and land-use stud- 
ies. Use of field methods, mapping, and data col- 
lection for geographical reports. 

600 Independent Research in Geography (3) 
Research report project, including readings and 
application of methodology. PREREQ^ Approval 



ot discipline graduate coordinator. 

♦ 610 Thesis (3-6) A thesis is developed on a 
research problem for which the student formulates 
a theory, proposition or hypothesis, and investi- 
gates available information on the subject. 

615 Internship (3-6) On-the-job experience in 
the application ot theory, execution ot substantive 
research, and provision of service with professional 
agencies at selected oflF-campus locations. 

In addition to the above GEO courses, ADM 
courses are offered in connection with the master 
of science in administration. See course titles and 
descriptions under "Master of Science in 
Administration" on page 30. 

♦ This course may be taken again for rreHit, up to 
a maximum of six credits. 



Geology and Astronomy 

207 Boucher HaU 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2727 

Dr. Wiswall, Chairperson 

Dr. Good, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Richard M. Busch, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Elizabeth LeeAnn Srogi, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
John Stolar, Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 
C. Gil Wiswall, Ph.D., University of Montana 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Cynthia G. Fisher, Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder 
Steven C. Good, Ph.D., University of Colorado, Boulder 
Allen H.Johnson, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University 
Timothy M. Lutz, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Arthur R. Smith, Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Marc R. Gagne, Ph.D., University of Georgia 
Joby Hillikcr, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Geology and Astronomy offers a master of arts 
degree in physical science designed to provide the precoUege teacher 
with enhanced academic preparation in the earth, apace, and related 
sciences. Each student's course of study is individually designed 
based on previous academic preparation in science and the specific 
teaching assignment and environment. The student may select a 
thesis or nonthesis option depending on his or her academic goals 
and requirements. By completing the M.A. program, students with 
a bachelors degree in science and teaching certification can obtain 
earth and space science and/or general science teaching certification 
with the appropriate selection of elective courses. 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants with teaching certification have the following requirements: 

1. Complete application 

2. Copy of teaching license 



3. Prerequisites of ESS 101 and 111 or equivalents 

4. Permission of graduate review committee 

5. If the undergraduate GPA is less than 2.5, the student must take one 
of these standardized tests and score as indicated: GRE (more than 
1000), MAT (greater than the 50th percentile), or Praxis PPST 
(greater than the Pennsj'h'ania Department of Education minimum). 

Applicants without teaching certification have the following 
requirements: 

1. Completed application 

2. Prerequisites of ESS 101 and 111 or equivalents 

3. Complete an approved program of study form 

4. Permission of graduate review committee 

5. Formal admission to teacher certification in first semester 

6. If the undergraduate GPA is less than 2.5 and the degree older than 
five years, a student may be admitted provisionally with one of these 
standardized tests and score as indicated: GRE (more than 1000), 
MAT (greater than the 50th percentile), or Praxis PPST (greater 
than the Pennsylvania Department of Education minimum). 

Applications should be submitted to the University's Office of 
Graduate Studies, which will forward the application to the depart- 
ment's graduate coordinator. The graduate review committee will 
screen all applications. An interview may be requested ot the appli- 
cant. The admission decision will be based on the strength of the 
application and the interview, if scheduled. 

Application deadlines: May 1 for fall admission, November 1 for 
spring admission, March 1 for summer admission. Students wishing 
to be considered for a graduate assistantship must applv by 
December 1 of the preceding year. 

Degree Requirements 

All students complete a core of five courses: environmental geolog}', 
the field as a classroom, meteorology, oceanography, and earth systems. 
Students choosing the nonthesis option must also complete geomet- 
ries. Students are required to write a 3-5 page essay for each course 
within their program relating the content of that course to another 
course within their program. The portfolio required for the nonthesis 
option consists of five of these essays selected by the student. 



Geology and Astronomy 



Thesis Option 

Students must complete a minimum of 15 credits approved by the 
thesis committee beyond the core. Up to six graduate credits may be 
taken in biology, chemistry, computer science, mathematics, or 
physics. The student must write and orally defend a six-credit thesis 
to complete the program. 

Nonthesis Option 

Students must complete a minimum of 21 credits approved by the 
advisory committee beyond the core and geometries. Up to nine 
graduate credits may be taken in biolog)', chemistry, computer science, 
mathematics, or physics. The student must submit a portfolio and 
pass an oral comprehensive examination to complete the program. 

Earth and Space Science Teaching Certification Requirements 

The following courses will complete the requirements for secondary 
earth and space science teaching certification: 

1. ESS 101, 111, 502, 504, 521, 523, 530, 536, 570, 596 

2. ESS electives: six hours of additional course work in earth and 
space science 



3. Allied science and math: BIO 110; CHE 103 and lab; MAT 105 
or 110 and 121 (statistics); PHY 130 

4. Education course(s): SCE 350 or 500 and course work required 
by the College of Education , 

General Science Teaching Certification Requirements 

The following courses will complete the requirements for secondary 
general science teaching certification: 

1. BIO 110, 215, 217; CHE 103 and lab, 104 and lab; ESS 101, 111. 
530, 570; PHY 130 or 170, 140 or 180; 12 hours of electives with- 
in one of the above science disciplines that demonstrate proficien- 
cy in fieldwork, research, and technolog)' (see adviser for specifics) 

2. One interdisciplinary science course (BIO 102, ENV 102, ESS 
102, or SCB 210), and MAT 105 or 110 (pre-calculus) and 121 
(statistics) 

3. Education course(s): SCE 350 or 500 and course work required 
by the College of Education. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
GEOLOGY AND ASTRONOMY 

Symbol: ESS, except as noted 

It is assumed that for all geology courses, ESS 101 
is a prerequisite, and for all astronomy courses, 
ESS 111 is a prerequisite. In addition, any course 
may be taken with permission ot the instructor. 
502 Investigating Earth Materials (3) Origins of 
minerals and rocks. Observation, data collection, 
and analysis applied to the study of earth materials. 
Hands-on experience in sample identification and 
mineral analysis in the laborator)' and field. 
Introduction to software and Internet resources for 
minerals and rocks. Preparation of teaching mod- 
ules involving minerals, rocks, and local geology. 
Required one-day field trip on a weekend. PRE- 
REQl ESS 101 or equivalent; CHE 103 and 104 
or equivalent is strongly recommended. 

504 Historica] Geology (3) Geologic history of 
the earth and the evidence for this history, includ- 
ing discussion of the formation of the earth, atmos- 
phere, oceans, and the historical evolution of land, 
air, and sea and the lite that inhabits these environ- 
ments. Examination of fossils and geologic maps. 
PREREQ:BIO 110, CHE 104,andCRL 104. 

505 Petrology (3) Origin, classification, and iden- 
tification of rocks. Hand specimen examination. 
PRKREQ; ESS 502. 

507 Geology of the Solar System (3) The geolo- 
gy, origin, and properties of planets, comets, aster- 
oids, moons, and meteorites; planetary exploration. 
PRERE(i One introductory course in astronomy 
and one in geologj'. 

510 Intermediate Mineralogy (3) How the pet- 
rographic microscope, x-ray diffraction, and the 
electron microscope are used to identify minerals. 
PREREQ: ESS 502. 

513 Principlesof Geochemistry (3) Migration 
and distribution of the chemical elements within 
the earth; chemistry of the lithosphere, hydro- 
sphere, and biosphere; chemical changes through- 
out earth history; the geochcmical cycle. 

520 Structural Geology (3) An introduction to 
structural analysis: a study of the deformational 
features of the earth's crust and the forces respon- 
sible for producing them. PREREQl ESS 505, or 
permission of instructor 

521 Geometries (3) Application of computational 



and statistical methods to geological problems. Geo- 
logic sampling, data comparisons in environmental, 
petrologic, paleontologic, and geochemical problems. 
523 The Field as a Classroom (3) A study of field 
techniques that enable teachers to develop lessons 
using field sites. Topics include researching field 
sites, field trip design and planning, preparatory 
and summative activities. Course is conducted 
largely in the field. 

ESL 527 Electron Microscopy I (3) A one- semes- 
ter lecture/laborator)' course in theor)- operation and 
applications of electron beam technology in scientif- 
ic research. Course scheduled on student-demand 
basis. Cannot be applied to the M.A. degree with- 
out prior approv;il of the graduate committee. 

530 Principlesof Oceanography (3) Geology of 
the ocean floor, water movements, chemical char- 
acteristics of sea water, and vertical and horizontal 
distribution of plants and animals. Brief history ot 
oceanography. 

531 Introduction to Paleontology (3) Identifica- 
tion, paleobiology, and importance ot tossils; pale- 
oecology; and evolution. 

532 Advanced Oceanography (3) An advanced 
course in oceanography covering resources, oceano- 
graphic literature, animal-sediment relationships, 
field techniques, estuaries, salt marshes, sea level 
changes, and pollution. PREREQ: ESS 230 or 530. 

533 Crystallography and Optical Mineralogy (3) 
Application of the principles of symmetry and 
crystal chemistry to understand the properties of 
minerals and rocks. Use of the petrographic 
microscope to identifv minerals in thin section. 
PREREQ: ESS 502, general chemistry. 

535 Introduction to Remote Sensing (3) An 
introduction to the science and technology of 
remote sensing and the applications of remote sens- 
ing data to geology, oceanography, meteorolog)', and 
the environment. Includes a discussion of the histo- 
ry and principles of remote sensing; tundamentals 
of electromagnetic radiation; theory and types of 
active and passive remote sensing systems; tunda- 
mentals of image interpretation; digital analysis of 
LANDSAT and AVI IRR data; operation of enw- 
ronmental satellites; and fiiture imaging systems. 

536 Teaching Environmental Geology (3) Provides 
resources and strategies for teachers of environmen- 
tal geology. Includes formulation of lesson plans, 
hands-on activities, and field trips. Subject matter 



will include natural hazards, namral resources, waste 
management, and sustainable development. 
539 Hydrology (3) The factors that control the 
distribution, occurrence, and recoverability of 
groundwater; techniques for locating and estimat- 
ing recoverable water; groundwater pollution and 
waste water disposal. PREREQ: CHE 104, CRL 
104, and MAT 162. 

542 Geophysics (3) Methods and techniques of 
physics applied to interpreting the internal struc- 
ture and composition of the earth. PREREQ^ 
MAT 162, PHY 180, or PHY 140. 

543 Geomorphology I (3) Lecwres will present 
the constructional and degradational processes 
that have shaped present landtorms and are con- 
stantly moditjing those landforms. Laboratories 
will focus on the interpretation ot topographic 
maps and the use of remote sensing materials. 
550 Sedimentology and Strarigraphy (3) The 
nature and origin ot stratified deposits; the tempo- 
ral-spatial relationships among stratified deposits, 
and other geologic and biologic phenomena; and 
the reconstruction of paleoenvironments. 

555 Intermediate Astronomy (3) An analytical and 
qualitative analysis of selected astronomical topics: 
orbits, stellar properties, telescopes, photometry, solar 
surface details, nebuJae, galaxies, and stellar evolution. 
Two-hour lecture and two-hour lab, including inde- 
pendent obser\'ator)' work. PREREQ^ Any descrip- 
tive astronomy course and iilgcbra/trigonometry. 
562 History of Astronomy (3) The development 
ot astronomical theories trom Greek times to the 
20th cenmry. PREREQ^ Any descriptive astrono- 
my course. 

570 Principlesof Meteorology (3) An in-depth 
study of the dynamic nature of the atmosphere 
with an emphasis on the role of weather-related 
phenomena in daily lite. 

571 Advanced Meteorology (3) An in-depth study 
ot atmospheric phenomena such as midlatitude cy- 
clones, global and local wind systems, hurricanes, tor- 
nadoes, and thunderstorms. Includes basics ot weath- 
er forecasting models and prediction techniques. 
575 Introduction to the Planetarium (3) 
Principles and use ot the planetarium in teaching. 
Specific projects are assigned. PREREQ; Any 
general astronomy course. 

580 Special Problems (1-3) Study of special topics 
and current developments in the earth and space 



Health 



sciL-iiccs. I'KKRlvQ; I'criiiissioii ot instructor. 

♦ 591 Independent Study (1-3) An investigation by 
the student. I'KI!RKQ^ I'erinissioii ot department. 
596 Earth Systems Science (3) Knergj' drives 
interactions between the lithospherc, hydrosphere, 
atmosphere, and ccosphere producing an earth 
system of biogeochemicid cycles that may be in 
homeostasis or change. The geological records of 
past icehouse and greenhouse climates are exam- 
ined as potential models for evaluating the conse- 
quences of human-induced global environmental 
change and the choices that face society at local, 
national, and international scales. Instruction and 
assessments designed to model innovative strate- 
gies and current themes in earth systems science. 
PREREQ: KSS 523, 530, 536, 570, and 12 credits 
of program electivcs, or permission of instructor. 

♦ 600 Thesis Research I (3) A thcon' is devel- 



oped on a research problem tor which the student 
produces a thesis. I'REREQ; Permission of adviser. 

♦ 601 Thesis Research II (3) A theory is devel- 
oped on a research problem tor which the student 
produces a thesis. I'REREQ^ Permission of adviser. 

♦ 602 Directed Research I (3) A theory is devel- 
oped on a research problem for which the student 
produces a graduate paper PREREQ^ Permission 
of adviser. 

♦ 603 Directed Research II (3) A theory is 
developed on a research problem for which the 
student produces a graduate paper. PREREQi 
Permission of adviser. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

Symbol: SCE 

500 Modern Trends in Science Education (3) 

Introduction to current research in science educa- 



tion; a critical review ot the literature. 
501 Modern Trends in Teaching Earth and 
Space Science (3) Recent materials and techniques 
in secondary schiM)l earth and space science. 
510 Workshop in Secondary School Curricula 
(3) Study ot one ot the commonly used science 
programs for secondary schools. The selected pro- 
gram is announced in advance. 
595 Elementary School Science Instruction (3) A 
course to improve the science content backgrounds 
of elementary school teachers and administrators. 

SCIENCE OFFERINGS DESIGNED 

FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

TEACHERS 

PHY 571 Physics for the Elementary Teacher (3) 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Health 

207 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2931 

Dr. Mustalish, Chairperson 

Dr. Cinelli, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Bethann Cinelli, D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

Roger W. Mustalish, Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

Robert P. Nye, Ed.D., Temple University 

Gopal Sankaran, M.D., Dr.P.H., University of California, Berkeley 

Maura J. Sheehan, Sc.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Charles V. Shorten, Ph.D., Clemson University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Lynn Carson, Ph.D., Temple University 

Jeffrey E. Harris, D.H.Sc, Loma Linda University 

Tammy James, Ph.D., Kent State University 

Janet M. Lacey, Dr. PH., University of North Carolina 

Paul E. Stang, Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

ASSISTAiNT PROFESSORS 

Dcbra Bill, Ph.D., Temple University 

James W. Brenner, Ph.D., Temple University 

Sandra Gross, Ph.D., Kansas State University 

Tanya Morgan, Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Health offers degree programs leading to the mas- 
ter of education in health and the master of public health (M.P.H.). 
The master of education enriches academic preparation for teaching 
health education in elementary and secondary schools. A concentra- 
tion in school health is oftered. 

The M.P.H. is designed primarily to meet the individual needs of 
the graduate student pursuing a career in public health, with 
emphasis in communit)^ health, environmental health, health care 
administration, and integrative health. 

Comniunicatiori with the Department 

All inquiries and other communications regarding the graduate pro- 
gram in health should be addressed to the coordinator of graduate 



studies. Students also may call for information at 610-436-2267, fax 
at 610-436-2860, or e-mail at bcinelli@wcupa.edu. 

MASTER OF PUBLIC HEALTH 

Admission Requirements 

Applicants must meet the basic requirements of the University for 
admission to graduate study and must present either a baccalaureate de- 
gree attained in their anticipated major area of health or equivalent pre- 
paration in a related field, and two letters ot recommendation. Students 
who do not have adequate academic and professional preparation in the 
desired program of study will be required to take foundation courses. 

Requirements for Admission to Degree Candidacy 

Within the 12-15 semester hours of precandidacy, majors in health 
must complete departmental and concentration core courses with a 
minimum grade point average for these and all other courses during 
precandidacy of 3.0. 

Requirements for the M.P.H. 

Students must complete the M.P.H. curriculum shown below with a 
minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.0. 



36 semester hours 
15 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Public Health Core 

ENV 530; HEA 520, 526, 630, and 632 

II. Focused Elective Area 18 semester hours 
Under advisement, students select a focused elective area. These 
are thematically related electives designed to provide the student 
with cohesive, comprehensive knowledge of key areas within pub- 
lic health. The focused elective areas are health care administra- 
tion, communit)' health, environmental health, and integrative 
health. Contact the department for the current list of available 
electives in each area. 

in. Other Degree Reequirements 3 semester hours 

HEA 650 

Graduate Certificate in Emergency Preparedness in 
Public Health 

This certificate is designed for public health, environmental health, 
occupational health, and emergency professionals along with man- 
agers and educators who need to upgrade their skills in the area of 
protecting people in emergencies. HEA 520 provides a solid prepa- 




I Icahh 



ration in tlindamental skills such as epidemiolog)' and public health 
practice, while ENV 530 allows the student to learn how to identify, 
measure, and control environmental hazards. ENV 545 and 551 
expand the student's knowledge about risks and how they are meas- 
ured, modeled, and communicated. ENV 570 and 575 focus on the 
specifics of emergency preparedness and on the mitigation of the 
risks of chemical and biological hazards. For more information, con- 
tact Dr. Charles V. Shorten, 610-436-2360; tbi, 610-436-2860; or 
e-mail, cshorten@wcupa.edu. 

Curriculum 18 semester hours 

Required Courses: 

ENV 530, 545, 551, 570, 575; and HEA 520 

Graduate Certificate in Health Care Administration 

The graduate certificate in health care administration provides 
health care professionals an opportunity to expand their knowledge 
of health care administrative issues. An accelerated format is avail- 
able for many of the courses so the certificate can possibly be earned 
in three semesters or less. 

Departmental Requirements 

Apphcants must meet the basic requirements of the University, 
given under "Admissions, " and must present either a baccalaureate 
degree attained in their anticipated major area of health or equiva- 
lent preparation in a related field. They must also submit a one-page 
statement of career objectives and arrange for two letters of recom- 
mendation. For more information contact Dr. Tanya Morgan, 610- 
436-2113; fax, 610-436-2860; or e-mail, tmorgan@wcupa.edu. 

Curriculum 18 semester hours 

Required Courses: 

ADM 501 and 503; HEA 630, 631, 640, and 642 

Graduate Certificate in Integrative Health 

The graduate certificate in integrative health is designed for health- 
care professionals desiring graduate study of evidence-based inte- 
grated approaches to health promotion, disease prevention, and 
treatment. Please note that this certificate is not designed to prepare 
practitioners in any given modality. For more information, contact 
Dr. Roger Mustalish, chairperson. Department of Health, 610-436- 
2931; fax, 610-436-2860; or e-maU, rmustalish@wcupa.edu. 



Curriculum 18 semester hours 

I. Required Course 3 semester hours 
HEA 501 

II. Electives 15 semester hours 
Students will select five graduate health courses under advisement. 
ENV 530; HEA 500, 503, 510, 511, 512, 538, 545, 547, 550, 581 
(e.g., homeopathy or traditional Chinese medicine), 609 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SCHOOL HEALTH 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the basic requirements of the University, 
given under Admission, applicants must present a baccalaureate 
degree attained in the field of health, or equivalent preparation in a 
related field and two letters of recommendation. 

Requirements for Admission to Degree Candidacy 

Within the 12-15 semester hours of prccandidacv, the student must 
complete departmental and concentration core courses with a mini- 
mum grade point average (GPA) of 3.0. Students who do not have 
adequate professional and/or academic preparation for the desired 
program of study will be required to take foundation courses. 
Teaching certification is not offered through this program. 

Requirements for the M.Ed. 

1. Satisfactory completion of the M.Ed, curriculum shown below, 
with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 in the concentration 

2. Successful completion of the research project 

Registration Policy for Research Credits 

Research credits for the M.Ed, arc earned in HEA 601. These credits 
must be preceded bv successfiil completion of the degree core, con- 
centration core, and concentration electives taken under advisement. 
The student can enroll in HEA 601 only once. 



Curriculum 

I. School Health Core 

HEA 538, 620, 622, 632 

II. Concentration Electives 

Selected under advisement 
School health electives (12) 
Education/counseling electives (6) 

III. Additional Degree Requirements 
HEA 601 



33 semester hours 
12 semester hours 

18 semester hours 



3 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
HEALTH 

Symbol: ENV 

524 Industrial Hygiene (3) A study of the recog- 
nition, evaluation, and control of health hazards in 
the work environment. PREREQi ENV 530, per- 
mission ot instructor. 

530 General Knvironmental Health (3) This 
course will address the protection of human health 
from environmental disease agents. Students will 
learn current issues in environmental risk assess- 
ment, air and water pollution, waste management, 
and workplace health and safety. Students will use 
this information to communicate effectively the 
relevant environmental risk to populations they 
serve. Training and education strategies and the use 
ot instructional resources, including the Internet, 
will be integrated into the learning experience. 

532 Hospital Environment (3) A comprehensive 
assessment ot the environmental health aspects of 
hospitals, including microbiologic considerations, 
environmental hygiene, safety, general sanitation, 
and administration. 

533 Water Quality and Health (3) An examina- 



tion of the physical, chemical, and biological char- 
acteristics of natural waters and their significance 
for human health; methods ot water treatment and 
distribution also will be considered. 
534 Watershed Dynamics (3) A detailed exami- 
nation of watersheds, with emphasis on spatial and 
temporal variability of water pollution parameters. 
Methods of assessing pollution ot water resources 
will be presented. 

536 Hazardous Waste Management (3) An 
assessment of the sources, characteristics, and 
human health effects of hazardous wastes, with 
emphasis on the design and implementation of 
control practices. I'KKKEQ: ENV 530. 

537 Water Pollution Control (3) The principles and 
practice of pollution contn>l ot municip;J and indus- 
trial wastewaters. Emphasis on wastewater character- 
iz;ition, monitoring, and treatment facility operations. 

538 Ground Water Contamination (3) Provides a 
qualitative and tjuantitativc examination of the 
late, transport, and remediation ot contaminants 
in ground water 

540 Seminar in Environmental Health (3) 
Directed reading, discussions, and oral presenta- 
tion on contemporary issues in environmental 



health. PREREQ: ENV 530. 

545 Risk Assessment (3) Provides a qualitative and 
quantitative examination ot hazard, toxicity, and 
exposure assessment to establish human health and 
ecological risk from environmental contamination. 

546 Environmental Assessment (3) An examina- 
tion ot methodologies neccss.ir\' to conduct compre- 
hensive environmental assessments. Monitoring 
strategies, ticld sampling techniques, and data quali- 
t)' assurance will be presented. Particuhir emphasis 
will be given to the applications of geographic infor- 
mation systems (CIS) to eni-ironmental assessments. 

547 Environmental Regulations (3) Provides a 
fiindamental overview of major environmental law 
principles. Focuses on a wide range of air, waste, 
water, transportation, and occupational regulations. 
551 Environmental Toxicology (3) A multif^ic- 
etcd investigation of the health problems caused 
by various toxins and hazards found in the general 
environment and the workplace. The human 
body's reactions to environmental toxins; how sus- 
pected environmental toxins are experimentally 
investigated and the specific health effects of criti- 
cal environmental toxins will be emphasized. 
PREREQ: ENV 530, permission of the instmctor. 



Health 



553 Occupatiunal Salcty (3) A Mudv ul llic prac- 
tices to reduce safety risks in the work environ- 
ment through recognition, evaluation, and control 
of safety hazards. PRI-:R1:Qi ENV 530, permis- 
sion of instructor. 

570 Emergency Preparedness (3) This course 
examines the historical, legal, and regulatory frame- 
work for dealing with emergencies emphasizing the 
four phases of emergency management. It addresses 
emergency preparedness by schools, businesses, 
communities, and counties for nanir.d disasters, fail- 
ures of technology (spills, accidents, and explo- 
sions), and acts of war or terrorism. The course is 
designed for profession;Us in environmental and 
public health, emergency rcsponders (police, fire, 
hazmat, and medical), planners, educators, and oth- 
ers who m:\\ serve in a leadership capacitv'. 
575 Bioterrorism and Public Health (3) This 
course addresses the protection of the public's 
health and that of workers such as first responders 
from biological agents that cause disease and/or 
death. Students will learn current issues in disaster 
mitigation, how biological agents can be transmit- 
ted in the environment, measurement techniques, 
decontamination methods, the proper use of per- 
sonal protective equipment, and response strategics 
for bioterrorism emergencies and related cata- 
strophic events. Students will analrze and synthe- 
size this information to analvzc risk, communicate 
that risk, and develop policies and action plans to 
protect specific populations. Communication and 
coping strategies, group interaction, case studies, 
and the use of Internet resources will be integrated. 
581 Special Topics (1-3) An in-depth study of 
selected, current topics relevant to the development 
of environmentiil he;ilth professionals. Specific top- 
ics will be noted in the master schedule. PRE- 
RKQ: ENV 5.30, permission of instructor. 
615 Thesis (3) A course for the master of science 
candidate. Students will select a topic, review the 
literature, prepare and conduct a research proposal, 
and write the thesis document. The student will 
defend the proposal and thesis document before a 
thesis committee. 

Symbol: HEA 

500 Diseases (3) Provides a contemporary view of 
disease and prevention, and a more precise under- 
standing of disease processes. Body systems are 
reviewed, and the etiology, pathophysiology, symp- 
toms, diagnostic techniques, and treatment meth- 
ods used in selected diseases are studied. Illnesses 
most frequently found in our society are explored. 

501 Integrative Health (3) A comprehensive eval- 
uation of alternative and complementary medicine 
aimed at describing how these modalities are 
being integrated with allopathic care. Focus will be 
on Eastern, African, and Native American tradi- 
tions; homeopathy; naturopathy; botanical medi- 
cine; energy work; and mindAiody health. 

502 Human Development: Implication for Healdi 
Education (3) This course examines human develop- 
ment from an applied perspective. Health educators 
and others working with preschool and school-aged 
children, as \vell as adolescents will examine phvsical, 
cognitive, and emotional development. Course par- 
ticipants will explore developmental!)' appropriate 
approaches to education and mentoring of children 
and youth. The course includes the use of readings 
on contemporary issues and policv' initiatives affect- 
ing children ,^nd TOuth, along with case studies. 

503 Human Nutrition (3) Selected topics in 
human nutrition will be extensively examined, 
such as fiber and health, vitamins and minerals in 



health and disease, methods of weight control, 
anorexia nervosa, and bulimia. Emphasis is placed 
on methods of evaluating nutrition-related litera- 
ture and claims, and interpretation of data and sci- 
entific studies relevant to nutrition. 
506 Current Issues in Death and Dying (3) The 
course is intended to provide accurate information 
on a variety of topics related to death. Students 
will examine theories and concepts related to con- 
troversial issues of death and dying. 

510 Adolescent Medicine Issues (3) This course 
is designed for the health professional working 
with adolescents. Topics will include eating disor- 
ders, sports medicine issues, risk behaviors, and 
other common concerns among adolescents. 

511 Stress Management Techniques and Program 
Development (3) The first half of the course is de- 
voted to examining basic stress concepts, the psy- 
chophysiology of stress, common stressors and their 
effect, and the relationship between stress and dis- 
ease. The second half consists of a comprehensive re- 
view of stress management techniques that deal with 
cognitive restructuring, relxxation, and relationship 
building. Considerable emphasis is placed on person- 
al application and group interaction in the classes. 

512 AJDS and PubUc Health (3) Epidemiology of 
HIV/ AIDS; natural Itistory of HIV infection, psy- 
chosocial, economic, educational, ethical, legal, and 
health care issues related to HIV/ AIDS vriU be ad- 
dressed. Impact on social groups (minorities, women, 
and adolescents) will be discussed. Heath promotion 
and disease prevention strategies will be highlighted. 
515 Professional Ethics and the Health Profes- 
sions (3) This course focuses on professional ethical 
issues relevant to health in various settings. Swdents 
will examine ethical principles and theories underly- 
ing ethical dilemmas. Major areas of emphasis 
include ethical decision making, principles and the- 
ories, codes of ethics, protection of human subjects, 
and ethical concerns in graduate education. 

520 Public Health Epidemiology (3) /\ji 
overview of the epidemiological model of disease 
causation. Various epidemiological study designs 
and their applications will be presented. 
522 Nutrition for Health Fitness and Perfor- 
mance (3) The study of nutrition as it relates to 
health, fitness, and performance. Attention will be 
given to nutritional guidelines for optimal health 
and physical performance. 

525 Elementary School Health Education (3) 
Trends in elementary school health: curricular ap- 
proaches and emphasis, teaching strategies, moti- 
vational techniques, resources, materials, issues, 
problems, and evaluations. PREREQ^ Background 
in elementary education. 

526 Biostatistics for Public Health (3) An 
over\iew of scientific methods, research designs, 
sampling, and survey techniques pertinent to the 
study of health issues will be presented. Choice and 
use of epidemiological and statistical software to 
analjTte health data sets will be emphasized. 

527 Human Sexuality and Family Life Education 
(3) This course will address ctirrent trends in family 
life education and the development and implemen- 
tation of programs in schools and communit)' set- 
tings. Emphasis will be placed on developing appro- 
priate content and strategies usefiJ in the classroom. 

528 Contemporary Issues in Sexuality (3) This 
course is designed to present academic information 
concerning human sex-ualit)' topics. Also incorpo- 
rated, when and where applicable, will be how to 
use this information in an educational setting. TTiis 
course does not have HEA 527 as a prerequisite. 



529 MentiJ Health Issues and the School Health 
Program (3) lliis course provides an overview of 
mental health and counseUng issues affecting chil- 
dren and youth in today's school and communities. 
The goal of the course is to broaden the student's 
understanding of key mental health issues children 
face in school and community settings. This course 
will provide relevant background information that 
will be used to promote positive mental health in 
the school, clinic, and community setting. 
531 The Community as a Basis for Health (3) 
An analysis of the community with its diverse 
population and its response to critical and current 
health problems. Emphasis will be placed on the 
need for balance between individual and commu- 
nity needs, rights, and responsibilities. 

537 Transcultural Health (3) An introduction to 
the role of culture in health and illness, and its role 
in accessing and utilizing health care in the United 
States, 

538 Evaluationof Health Programs (3) Em- 
phasis will focus on the procedures essential to the 
evaluation of health programs in a variety of set- 
tings (community, medical, school, worksite). 
Major areas Include conducting needs assessments, 
quaUty assurance measures, data collection meth- 
ods, and preparation of final reports. Includes both 
theoretical and practical experience. 

539 Health Promotion Program Planning (3) 
An advanced program planning course that pro- 
vides students with an opportunity to apply theo- 
ries, principles, and teaching strategies and meth- 
ods by developing a comprehensive plan for a 
health promotion program. 

544 Program Administration in Health and 
Human Service (3) This course will pro\ide students 
with the skills needed to administer community 
health programs in a nonprofit setting with a focus 
on program management in nonprofit agencies. 

545 Mind/Body Medicine (3) A comprehensive 
evaluation of the mind's role in disease prevention 
and healing. Emphasis will be placed on learning 
and practicing mind/body techniques and assess- 
ing the mind's role in preventing disease and pro- 
moting healing. 

547 Principles of Botanical Medicine (3) A com- 
prehensive evidence-based assessment of botanical 
medicines in health promotion, disease prevention, 
and symptom management. 
550 Evidence-Based Medicine and Public 
Health (3) A seminar on learning salient princi- 
ples of evidence-based medicine and evidence- 
based public health and their applications to 
improve the health of individuals and populations. 
555 Women's Health Issues -A Transcultural 
Perspective (3) Using a hfe cycle approach, this 
course makes a comparative analysis of women's 
lives and their health status across different cul- 
tures and nations. Women's health status as related 
to their multiple roles in the family and society 
will be examined. 

581 Special Topics (3) In-depth study of selerted 
health topics current to the interests and needs of 
professionals serving in various health and health- 
related areas. Topics will be announced prior to 
the first day of each semester. 
601 Research/Report Writing in Health Educa- 
tion (3) The M.Ed, candidate selects a school 
health issue or a critical topic for review of the lit- 
erature and produces a scholarly manuscript. PRE- 
REQi Permission of instructor. 
609 Independent Study and Special Projects (1- 
3) Research projects, seminar papers, reports of 



Histon- 



special contcrcnccs, and reading m liciltli. I'KI,- 
REQ: Administrative approval. 
611 Field Placement (3) A project for students in 
health concentrations. A\\ core course work should 
be completed before beginning the project. 
Permission of graduate coordinator required. 
620 School Health Programs (3) This course 
provides the theoretical underpinnings of the pro- 
fession, professional responsibilities, and program- 
matic and critical issues in comprehensive school 
health programs. 

622 Curriculum and Instruction (3) This course will 
address the foundation, philosophy, and practice of 
comprehensive school health education. Major focus 
in on tlie development, implementation, and e\'alua- 
tion of K-12 comprehensive school health education. 

623 Substance Use Prevention (3) Designed for 
future and present school and public health educators, 
this course includes content and program planning 
skills for community and school: tobacco, alcohol, and 
other drug prevention curriculum and programs. 
625 Multicultural Issues in Health Education 
(3) The purpose of this course is to promote dis- 
cussion and awareness among students regarding 
the cultural aspects of health issues, identification 
of specific strengths, positive cultural models, and 
practices for addressing some of the major health 
problems of diverse populations. 

630 Health Care Administration (3) Administrative 
and management techniques acquired in the admin- 



i>trativc core arc applico lu the problems involved in 
health administration/management. Topics will 
include federal, state, and local health agencies; 
health care centers; organization principles; personnel 
fectors; public relations; and fiscal management. 

631 Health Services Law (3) .\n analysis of the 
basic legal concepts and major legal issues that are 
important to and directly affect the health services 
administrator. Topics include legal frameworks of 
health organizations and health practitioners, 
administrative policy, contracts, consent, patient's 
rights, legal death, insurance, liability, and research. 

632 Social and Behavioral Aspects of Health (3) 
An advanced course on current theories in health 
behavior and the application of these theories to 
management methods in the health care field. 
Topics include trends in health behavior, health 
concerns, analysis of the decision-making process, 
and factors affecting health behavior. 

640 Issues in Managed Care (3) The fiiture of 
managed care depends on the performance of the 
managed care industry', especially the goal of pro- 
viding high-qualit)' health care at the lowest costs 
possible. This course will discuss the challenges 
faced by managed care organizations and strategies 
used to overcome them. 

642 Access and Distribution of Health Services 
(3) This course introduces students to the applica- 
tions used to examine health care distribution 
wihtin the realm of health policy analysis and 



healtli sciiii.c^ icsearch. Demonstrations will 
include analysis of the distribution of disease, vari- 
ous health indicators, and health care resources. 
650 Applied Learning Experience Seminar (3) 
This course is intended as a capstone experience in 
the M.P.H. in health program. It is intended to 
bring students together from a wide array of sub- 
disciplines in public health, and through field and 
research experience explore and share common 
principles of public health practice. Students will 
choose a project within their area of expertise and, 
under faculty guidance, produce an end product 
that meets professional standards. 

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES FOR 
GRADUATE CREDIT 

The Department of Health has approved the fol- 
lowing undergraduate course for graduate credit 
when scheduled with the approval of the student's 
adviser and department chairperson. No more 
than three credits of 400-level course work may be 
used to satisfy' graduate degree requirements. 
ENV460 Industrial Hygiene II (3) Evaluation 
techniques for monitoring the industrial environ- 
ment will be learned in a laboratory setting and in 
the field. These techniques will include monitor- 
ing of air quality, air flow, noise, heat stress, and 
radiation. Evaluation of personal protective equip- 
ment, pulmonary fonction testing, and audiomet- 
ric testing also will be investigated. PREREQ^ 
EN V 102, 452, or permission of instructor. 



History 



506 Main HaU 
West Chester University 
West Chester, PA 19383 
'610-436-2201 
Dr. Legg, Chairperson 
Dr. Kirschenbaum, Assistant Chairperson 
Dr. Boes, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Lawrence R. Davidson, Ph.D., University of Alberta 

Claude R. Foster, Jr., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Charles Hardy, III, Ph.D., Temple University 

Thomas J. Heston, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University 

William Hewitt, Ph.D., University of Wyoming 

James Jones, Ph.D., University of Delaware 

W. Bennett Peters, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Marita Boes, Ph.D., City University of New York 

Jonathan Friedman, Ph.D., University of Maryland 

Karin E. Gedge, Ph.D., Vale University 

Lisa A. Kirschenbaum, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Wayne Hanley, Ph.D., University of Missouri 

Thomas J. Legg, Ph.D., The College of William and Mary 

LaTonya Thames-Leonard, M.A., University of Mississippi 

Programs of Study 

The Department of History offers two degrees: the master of arts in 
history and, in cooperation with the School of Education, the mas- 
ter of education in history. 



The master of arts in history provides a broad base for teaching 
excellence, a platform for studies leading to the Ph.D., and skills for 
informed decision making in the public and private sectors. 
Students with permission of the graduate coordinator mav take up 
to six semester hours in a discipline related to their major field ot 
study. The M.A. in history may be earned by completing either a 
thesis or nonthesis program. The nonthesis option is designed for 
students who desire more content courses as background tor their 
own teaching, further academic work, or personal enrichment. 
Students must concentrate in one ot three fields: world/compara- 
tive, European, or United States. 

The master of education in history is designed to provide in-service 
teachers with additional professional education courses and an 
opportunity to enlarge their understanding ot the historical past. It 
also is designed for the holders of the bachelor's degree who wish to 
earn state teacher certification while working toward a master's. 
Students in this program are advised by the Department ot History. 
The department also offers a nondegree protession;il growth pro- 
gram in which students take graduate courses for personal and pro- 
fessioniil growth without enrolling in the graduate program. 

Admission Requirements 

The Department of History requires a 3.0 grade point average 
(GPA) in history and a 2.75 overall GPA for admission to its grad- 
uate programs. A statement of professional goals, three letters of 
recommendation, preferably academic, and a sample of analytical 
writing that demonstrates proficiency in writing skills also are 
required. Applicants must have completed undergraduate surveys in 
U.S. history and world or Western civilization, and an undergradu- 
ate course in historical methodology or historical research. 



History 



Applicants who di) not meet the above criteria may he admitted on 
a provisional basis. Students also may take up to two graduate 
courses before formal admission to cither graduate program. 

Degree Requirements 

Students must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.0 and apply for degree 
candidacy upon completion of 12-18 hours of applicable course worL 
In both programs candidates must pass written coinprchensivc examina- 
tions at or neiir the conclusion of their course work. The comprehensive 
exiuninations ;ye administered each semester. ITiosc candidates wishing 
to tiike the cxiuninations in a given semester should contact the graduate 
coordinator during the first three weeks of the semester. With approval 
of the graduate coordinator, candidates also may complete up to two 
courses in a field related to history. Candidates also may apply towards 
their degree up to six credits of graduate course work taken elsewhere. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN HISTORY 

33 semester hours 



18 semester hours 



Nonthesis Option 

I. Major field 

Includes seminar (3) 

II. Minor field 9 semester hours 
IIL Electives 6 semester hours 

Students may take 3-6 semester hours as a related field option to 
be counted where appropriate above. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN HISTORY 



36 semester hours 
12 semester hours 



21 semester hours 



Curriculum 
Thesis Option 

I. Major field 

Includes thesis (6) and seminar (3) 

II. Minor field 9 semester hours 
IIL Elective 3 semester hours 

Students may take 3-6 semester hours as a related field option to 
be counted where appropriate above. 



Curriculum 

I. Professional education requirements 

(See page 92-93.) 

II. History courses (under advisement) 18 semester hours 
ID. HIS 500 3 semester hours 

IV. HIS 650, 651, or 652 3 semester hours 

V. Electives 3 semester hours 
(Professional education or academic) 

The Department of History has approved the following undergradu- 
ate courses for graduate credit when scheduled with the approval of 
the graduate coordinator or the department's chairperson: HIS 406, 
411, 412, 415, 416, 420, 421, 422, 423, 425, 427, 428, 435, 445, 450, 
451, 455, 474, and 480. No more than six credits of 400-leyel course 
work may be used to satisft' graduate degree requirements. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
HISTORY 

See also social science (SSC) 
Symbol: HIS 

500 Methods and Materials of Research in 
History (3) Basic techniques and procedures in 
research; major types of research and methods for 
locating, evaluating, and interpreting evidence. 
The student develops a tentative oudine, bibliog- 
raphy, and summary of an investigative procedure. 
Required of all degree-program students. 

501 Studies in the History and Culture of South 
Asia (3) The Indian subcontinent's dominant po- 
litical, cultural, and economic institutions. Features 
which contribute to an understanding of modern 
India and Pakistan. 

505 Studies in the History and Culture of East 
Asia (3) The traditional basis for modern Chinese, 
Japanese, and Korean societies. The interaction 
between European and Asian cultures and result- 
ing changes in East Asia. 

509 The Modern Middle East and the West (3) 

Recent history ot major Middle Eastern societies; 
Iran and the oil sittiation; Israel and the 
Palestinian question; conflicting cultures. 

511 Africa to Independence (3) Emergence of 
modern African nationalism against the back- 
ground of traditional African societ)' and the lega- 
cy ot European colonialism. 

512 Independent Africa (3) The post-war experi- 
ence of Sub-Saharan /Vfrica, viewed in the light of 
the end ot European colonial administration and 
the growth of an independent African society. 

515 Latin /\merica Since Independence (3) Pre- 
Columbian ^irt and thought, scholasticism, mercan- 
tilism, the Great Debate, Baroque architecture. 
Enlightenment, conserv-atism, liberalism, Roman- 
ticism, Modernism, Positivism, Aprismo, Mexican 
muralists, novel of social protest, existentialism, and 
music. Lineaments of the Latin- American mind. 

516 Modem Mexico (3) Me.xico during die 19th 
and 20th centuries; stress on the dramatic transfor- 
mation of Mexico from early narionhood to moder- 



nit)' in the short period ot a centut)' and a halt. 
517 "The Indian" in Latin America (3) Examines 
indigenous societies 1500-1990s, emphasizing 
colonial underpinnings ot Indian identit)', the 
19th-century "Indian Problem," and 20th-centur)' 
indigenous movements. 

520 Racism, Bigotry, Prejudice (3) Course exam- 
ines the evolution and roots of human prejudice 
and bigotry from a variety of perspectives - his- 
torical, sociological, and psychological. 
523 History of Germany (3) Germany in the 19th 
and 20th centuries: Napoleonic era, rise of Prussia, 
nationalism and unification, imperialism and World 
War I, National Socialism, World War II, divided 
Germany and Reunification. 

530 Problems in Medieval Civilization (3) Rise 
and fall of the Byzantine Empire, conquests of the 
Arabs and Turks, the crusades for the recovery of 
the Holy Land; the religious orders and the uni- 
versal aspirations of the Papacy. 

531 The Renaissance (3) Political, social, and cul- 
tural transitions in Italy and Northern Europe, 
1350-1550. 

532 The Reformation (3) Major and minor Prot- 
estant leaders and their movements; effects on the 
evolving nation-states; the Church of Rome's 
response; Wars of Religion and Treaty' of West- 
phalia; the Scientific Revolution. 

533 Dynastic Europe 17th Century (3) 
Compares and contrasts political, economic, and 
social developments of two major dynastic powers, 
namely Spain and France, during the 17th centur)'. 

534 The French Revolution and Napoleon (3) 
The central themes of the French Revolution, 
from the origins during the ancien regime to the 
fall of Napoleon and Congress of Vienna. 

535 Nationalism and Democracy: 1815-1914(3) 
Aftermath and effect of the I'rench Revolutionary- 
era; events brought on by the growth of national- 
ism and democrac)'; development of the industrial 
revolution. Roots of the First World War. 

536 Europe Since 1914 (3) Twentieth-century 
Europe, with emphasis on causes of World War I, 
Europe between World War I and World War U, 



and problems of contemporar)' Europe. 
540 The Evolution of Modem Russia (3) A cul- 
tural approach to the historical development of 
Russia from the foundation of Kiev to the 
Revolution of 1917. Emphasis is on Russia's politi- 
cal and aesthetic uniqueness. 

542 Women and Children in Early Modern 
Europe (3) Focuses on the private and public life 
of women and children of diverse social status in 
various European countries. Special attention is 
given to changing social, religious, economic, and 
cultural attitudes and how they affected the lives 
of women and children. 

543 Jews in Modem European History (3) This 
course assesses Jewish life and thought in the con- 
text of major European historical developments 
during the 19th and 20th centuries. Special atten- 
tion is given to the emancipation and acculturation 
process and the proliferation of anti-Semitism. 

544 Final Solution in Europe (3) This course 
explores the "Final Solution" of the "Jewish 
Question," the core of the Nazi Holocaust as it >vas 
administered in each country in Europe under 
German occupation during World War II. 

545 Holocaust (3) The study of steps leading to 
the Holocaust (1933-1945), the Holocaust itself, 
and the aftermath. The rise of Nazism is included. 

546 Genocide in Modem History (3) Case studies 
of major atrocities of the 20th century, analyzing 
how and why particular genocides were committed. 

547 Asocials and the Holocaust (3) This course 
studies the other victims of the Holocaust: 
G\*psies, homosexuals, persons with disabilities, 
Jehovah's Witnesses, and others. 

548 Women and the Holocaust (3) An examina- 
tion of women's experiences in Nazi-occupied 
Europe. Also explores the role of gender in Nazi 
ideology and in postwar testimonies. 

549 American Perspectives on the Holocaust (3) A 
brief histor)' of Je\Wsh people in America with an in- 
depth study of American reaction to the Holocaust. 

550 Colonial America: 1607-1763 (3) Develop- 
ment of the 13 colonies of Anglo- America from 
their setdement to mid-1 8th century. Emphasis on a 



I lolocaust and Genocide Studies 



conceptual analysis of specific events and problems. 
551 Revolutionary America: 1763-1789(3) 

American development trom the mid-18th centur)' 
to the framing ot the Constitution, wth emphasis 
on the causes of the American Revolution and the 
evolution of American institutions and ideas 
throughout the period. 

553 The Rise of the New Nation: 1789-1850 (3) A 
historiographical approach invohing interpretations 
of the foundations and development of the Federalist 
Part); emergence of Jeffersonian Democrac)', evolu- 
tion of Jack-sonian Democrac)', and events ot the 
Middle Period leading to the decade of controversy. 

554 Civil War and Reconstruction: 1850-1877 
(3) The war and its aftermath as the great water- 
shed of United States national history. Emphasis 
on the conflicting interpretations of the causes, 
nature, and effects of the Civil War. 

555 Emergence of Modern America: 1876-1930 
(3) ITie rise of industrial capitalism, urbanization, 
mass consumer society, and culture, and the 
impact of modernization on class gender, race 
relations, governance, and foreign policy. 

556 America Since 1919 (3) The impact of urban- 
ization and industralization on society, politics, and 
economics; the problems of wars - — declared and 
undeclared — and the various policies for peace. 

557 Problems in American Constitutional 
Development (3) Selected problems in the devel- 
opment of American constitutional government. 
The progressive adaptation of the law to a chang- 
ing social and economic order. Conflicts such as 
nationalism versus states' rights, and vested rights 
versus police power. 

558 History of the Cold War (3) American for- 



eign policy in Europe, Asia, Latin America, and 
the Middle East from 1945 to the end of the Cold 
War. Objectives sought by the United States and 
the political, military, economic, and social policies 
pursued during the Cold War. 
559 American Urban History (3) Research meth- 
ods and approaches for studying the history of 
cities in America. Emphasis on quantitarive analy- 
sis, including studies of urban population, social 
mobility, and voring patterns. 
561 The Indian in America's Past (3) The dis- 
possession ot the American Indian: land seizures, 
wars and treaties, cultural contact; customs, mores, 
economic, and religious life of the Indian; assimi- 
lation and preservation of Indian culture. 

601 Directed Readings in American History (3) 
A critical examination of significant works on 
selected topics in the field. PREREQ^ Permission 
of graduate coordinator. 

602 Directed Readings in European History (3) 
A critical examination of significant works on 
selected topics in the field. PREREQ; Permission 
of graduate coordinator. 

603 Directed Readings in World and Regional 
History (3) A critical examination ot significant 
works on selected topics in the field. PREREQ^ 
Permission ot graduate coordinator. 

650 Seminar in American History (3) Selected 
problems in American history. Subject announced 
in advance of each semester. PREREQ^ HIS 500 
and nine graduate credits of history. 

651 Seminar in European History (3) Selected 
problems in European history. Subject announced 
in advance of each semester. PREREQ;HIS 500 
and nine graduate credits of history. 



652 Seminar in History of the Non-Western 
World (3) Selected problems in non-Western 
world history. Subject announced in advance of 
each semester. PREREQ^ HIS 500 and nine grad- 
uate credits of history. 

660 Field Studies in History (3-6) A fully super- 
vised learning experience, usually a tour, designed 
to expose students to the culture, artifacts, and 
research facilities ot a given countr)* or area. 

690 Independent Studies in History (1-3) 
Research projects, reports, and readings in history. 
PREREQ^ Approval ot department chairperson. 

691 Thesis (6) 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Symbol: SSC 

502 Methods and Materials for Teaching Social 
Studies (3) Current practices and procedures; 
organization and planning; the use of classroom, 
library, and curriculum materials; testing, measure- 
ments, and evaluation; bibliographical sources for 
both teachers and students. 

503 Teaching Holocaust/Genocide Secondary 
Methods (3) This course prepares teachers of the 
Holocaust and genocides in special secondary 
social studies methods. 

580 Ethnic Cultures Institute (3) An interdisci- 
plinary otHering, the institute considers the contri- 
butions of ethnic groups to the culture of the 
United States. Designed primarily for teachers, 
community action personnel, and students who 
wish to increase knowledge and skills for develop- 
ing meaningful intergroup relationships and 
improving classroom instruction. Educators and 
community leaders take part. 



Holocaust and Genocide Studies 

409 Main HaU 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2789 

610-436-2345 

Dr. Friedman, Director and Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Helen Bcrger, Ph.D. (Sociology) 

Mary P. Brewster, Ph.D. (Criminal Justice) 

Kevin Dean, Ph.D. (Communication Studies) 

Claude R. Foster, Jr., Ph.D. (History) 

Paul D. Green, Ph.D. (English) 

William L. Hewitt, Ph.D. (History) 

Dennis Klinzing, Ph.D. (Communication Studies) 

Deborah Mahlstedt, Ph.D. (Psychology) 

Jasmine Tamahseb McConatha, Ph.D. (Psychology) 

C.Jack. Orr, Ph.D. (Communication Studies) 

Thomas W. Piatt, Ph.D. (Philosophy) 

Yury Polsky, Ph.D. (Political Science) 

Frederick Struckmeyer, Ph.D. (Philosophy) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Jonathan Friedman, Ph.D. (History) 
Lisa Kirschenbaum, Ph.D. (History) 
Margarctc J. Landwehr, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 



David G. Levasseur, Ph.D. (Communication Studies) 
Brian O'Neill, Ph.D. (Criminal Justice) 
Frauke \. Schnell, Ph.D. (Political Science) 
Christopher Teutsch, Ph.D. (English) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Joan Woolfrcy, Ph.D. (Philosophy) 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Holocaust and Genocide Studies offers a mas- 
ter of arts degree for students who complete the necessary 30 hours 
in the degree program. For the master's degree, field studies and a 
thesis are options. A graduate certificate is also offered for students 
who complete a 15-hour program of study. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN HOLOCAUST AND 
GENOCIDE STUDIES 

The purpose ot this program is to provide its graduates with the 
background and intellectual skills needed to either pursue careers as 
teachers or as history professionals for work in museums, archives, 
libraries, and other institutions. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to satisfying the University's general graduate admission 
requirements, applicants must submit two letters of recommenda- 
tion and a statement of personal goals. 



Kinesiology 



Requirements for the M.A. Degree 

1. Any history course with a grade of less than 3.0 GPA will not be 
accepted tor credit toward the degree. 

2. In order to complete the program, students must pass a written 
comprehensive examination. 

Curriculum 30 semester hours 

I. Phase I 9 semester hours 
One course to be selected from each of three fields of study from 
the following list (only one independent study may be applied): 
Communication Studies 

COM 503, 505, 507, and 509 
Criminal Justice 

CRj 505 
Philosophy 

PI 11 512, 590, and 599 
Political Science 

PSC 530, 542, and 590 
Professional and Secondary Education 

EDF 589 
Psychology 

PSY 509, 540, and 543 
Sociology 

SOC 590 

II. Phase II 9 semester hours 
Three courses from the following: 

Required: 

HIS 545 and 546 

Elective: One course from the following: 

HIS 523, 543, or 602 
Written comprehensive examination 
Recommended language training in area of specialization 



III. Phase III 6 semester hours 
Two courses from the following: 

HIS 520, 523, 536, 543, 544, 547, 549, 660; 
SSC 503, 540 

IV. Phase IV 6 semester hours 
Thesis Option 

HIS 691 (6) 
Thesis defense 
Nonthesis Option 
Required: HIS 651 

Elective: One course from the following*: EGE 409, ENG 
615, HIS 520, 536, 544, 547, 548, 549, 602; SSC 503, 540 
Oral examination 

Certificate in Holocaust and Genocide Studies 



15 semester hours 
9 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Required Courses 

HIS 545 and 546 

One additional course to be selected under advisement. 

II. Elective Courses 6 semester hours 
Two courses, to be selected under advisement, from the following: 

COM 503 and 507; CRJ 505; EGE 408-409; ENG 615; HIS 
543, 548, 549, 602; PHI 512; PSC 542; PSY 540, 543 

Course Descriptions 

Course titles and descriptions in Holocaust and Genocide Studies 
are listed under the relevant department. 

*The content of these courses may var)- from semester to semester. These 
courses count toward the degree only when the topic has been approved by the 
program director. 



Instructional Media 

Until fiirther notice, no new students wiU be admitted to the M.Ed., 
M.S., or instructional technology specialist certification program. 



Kinesiology 



206 Sturzcbccker Health Sciences Center 
West Chester University 
West Chester, PA 19383 
610-436-2260 
Dr. Zetts, Chairperson 

Dr. Melton, Assistant Chairperson and Coordinator of Graduate 
Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Frances Cleland, P.E.D., Indiana University 
Frank F. Fry, D.P.E., Springfield College 
Monica P. Lepore, Ed.D., New York University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

John Helion, Ed.D., Columbia University 

Karen M. Koehler, Ed.D., University of North Carolina at Greensboro 

Sheri A. Melton, Ph.D., Louisiana State University 



Paul K. Smith, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
W. Craig Stevens, Ph.D., Temple University 
Karin Volkwein, Ph.D., University of Tennessee 
John Williams, Ph.D., University of London 
Raymond Zetts, Ed.D., University of Georgia — Athens 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Margaret Ottley, Ph.D., Temple University 

Program of Study 

The Department of Kinesiology offers programs leading to a master of 
science degree in physical education with concentrations in general 
physical education, and exercise and sport phvsiology. A master of sci- 
ence in administration degree with a concentration in sport and athletic 
administration also is offered. The master of science degree in physical 
education, general physical education concentration (research project 



Kjnesiology 



track), enriches academic prcp;iration tor teaching in the public schot)ls 
or for obtaining emplo\Tnent in the v-arious professions related to physi- 
cal education. The master of science degree in ph\'sical education, exer- 
cise and sport physiolog}' concentration (research refwrt track), enriches 
academic preparation for working in adult fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, 
and other clinical programs. Both master of science degrees in physical 
education (thesis track) are designed primarily to meet the individual 
needs of graduate students who want to pursue graduate work beyond 
the masters degree or a career in research. It also may prepare personnel 
for staff positions in education, government, and industry. 
The sport and athletic administration concentration in the master of sci- 
ence in administration program is designed to pro\ide academic prepa- 
ration for those persons interested in entering the field of sport and ath- 
letic administration, and to assist in upgrading the credentials ot those 
persons presently in the fields of sport and athletic administration. 
Certification in driver education and safe living also is offered by 
the Department of Kinesiology, as a summer program. 

The Professor Russell Sturzebecker Scholarship 

The graduate division in the School of Health Sciences in the 
Department of Kinesiology administers the Professor RusseD 
Sturzebecker Scholarship. Through the generosity of Mr. John F. 
Unruh, a $1,000 award is made each semester to a "worthy and 
needy" graduate student in health and physical education. The 
award is donated by Mr. Unruh in honor of Professor Sturzebecker. 
The recipient must be working fiill time in the field of health and physi- 
cal education and must be a part-rime student at West Chester Univer- 
sity working towards a master's degree in his or her professional field. 
Graduate students who meet the above criteria arc invited to submit 
a letter of application for the scholarship along with a resume of 
their professional and academic status. These documents should be 
submitted to the chairperson of the Department of Kinesiology on 
or before December IS for the spring semester award and on or 
before March 15 for the fall semester. 

The Graduate Scholarship 

The graduate division of the Dep;u-tment of Kinesiology administers 
a graduate scholarship. The amount of money awarded may vary 
somewhat from year to year depending on the fiinds available, but it 
is anticipated that the award will be appro.ximately $300 each year. 
Selection criteria include scholarship, citizenship and character, 
leadership, need, and ability in, and/or contribution to, specific areas 
of health or physical education. 

Application forms are available from the Department of Kinesiology, 
206 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center. 

Communication with the Department 

;\J1 inquiries and other communications regarding the graduate pro- 
gram in physical education should be addressed to the coordinator 
of graduate studies and sent to the department address found at the 
beginning of this section. 

Comprehensive Examination 

The comprehensive examination for graduate students in physical 
education is administered twice a year, in early March and late 
October. Each examination consists of an elective course portion, 
given for two hours on a Tuesday, and the required course portion, 
given for two hours on the following Thursday. 
Students who want to take the examination must be currently enrolled, 
admitted to degree candidacy and should have completed all required 
course work. In addition, students should have completed the majority 
of their elective requirements. A letter of intent to take the comprehen- 
sive examination should be filed with the coordinator of graduate stud- 
ies. Letters of intent should be filed by February 15 for the March ex- 
amination or September 15 for the October examination, respectively. 



Upon receipt ot the letter ol intent and with the approval ol the 
coordinator, students will be sent a letter explaining the details, 
time, and place of the examination. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM 
Concentration in General Physical Education 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
graduate degree program at West Chester University, applicants 
must present either a baccalaureate degree earned in their anticipat- 
ed major area of health or health and physical education, or equiva- 
lent preparation in a related field, and the following: 

A. Undergraduate preqrequisites: 

1. Human anatomy 

2. Human physiology 

3. Kinesiology 

4. Exercise physiology 

B. Requirements for one of the following tracks: 

1. Thesis track 

a. GPA: 2.75 or higher on a 4.0 scale 

b. GRE: 1000 (combined verbal and math) or higher 
recommended 

or 

2. Research report track 

a. GPA: 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale 

b. GRE: 900 (combined verbal and math) or higher , 
recommended 

C. Approval of application by the department graduate committee 

Acceptance recommendations are made by the department graduate 

committee. 

Admission to M.S. Degree Candidacy 

During the 12 to 15 hours of precandidacy, students must complete 
any three of the departmental core courses with a minimum GPA 
for these and all other courses of 3.0. 

Students must apply for candidacy within one semester after com- 
pleting 12-15 hours of precandidacv. 

Requirements for the M.S. Degree 

1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S. curriculum with a minimum 
GPA of 3.0 

2. Satisfactory performance on written and/or oral comprehensive 
examination 

3. Successfiil completion of the thesis or research project 

4. Oral defense of the thesis (for thesis track only) 

Curriculum 33-34 semester hours 

I. Degree Core 21 semester hours 
KIN 572, 580. 585, 600, 601, 602, and 681 

II. Additional Degree Requirements - 12 semester hours 
Thesis Track 

KIN 608 and 610 

Electives selected under advisement (6) 

Additional Degree Requirements - 13 semester hours 

Research Report Track 

KIN 606 and 607 

Electives selected under advisement (9) 

The thesis proposal must be formally approved during thesis seminar 
(KIN 608) before the student may register for thesis (KIN 610). 

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM 
Concentration in Exercise and Sport Physiology 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
graduate program at West Chester University, applicants must present a 
bachelor's degree in physical education or related field and the follovving: 



Kinesiology 



A. Uiicicrgrailuatc prcqrequisites: 

1. I luman anatomy 

2. Human physiology 

3. Kinesiology 

4. Exercise physiology 

5. Fitness assessment/exercise prescription or electrocardiography 
and stress testing 

B. Requirements for one of the following tracks: 
1. Thesis track 

a. GPA: 2.75 or higher on a 4.0 scale 

b. GRE: 1000 (combined verbal and math) or higher 
recommended 



or 
2. 



Research report track 

a. GPA: 2.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale 

b. GRE: 900 (combined verbal and math) or higher 
recommended 

C. Approval of application by the department graduate committee 

Acceptance recommendations arc made by the department graduate 
committee. 

Requirements for Admission to Degree Candidacy 

During the 12 to 15 hours of precandidacy, students must complete 
any three of the departmentiil core courses with a minimum GPA 
for these and all other courses of 3.0. 

Students must apply for candidacy within one semester after com- 
pleting 12-15 hours ot precandidacy course work. 

Requirements for the M.S. Degree 

1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S. curriculum with a GPA of 3.0 

2. Satisfactory performance on written and/or oral comprehensive 
examination 

3. Successful completion of the thesis or research project 

4. Oral defense of the thesis (for thesis trsck only) 

Curriculum 33-40 semester hours 

I. Degree Core 16-18 semester hours 
KIN 572, 585, 600, 601, 606/607 or 608/610, 

or STA 512 

II. Concentration Core 9 semester hours 
KJN 681,687, and 688 

in. Electives 6-9 semester hours 

An additional nine credit hours are required for the research report 

track (KIN 606/607). 

An additional six credit hours are required for the thesis track 

(KIN 608/610). 
IV. Internship 6 semester hours 

KIN 611 and 612 

Internship experience may be required of students in the research re- 



port track who did not have comparable experience as an undergrad- 
uate and/or have no work experience in their chosen field of study. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ADMINISTRATION 
Concentration in Sport and Athletic Administration 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the graduate requirements for admission to a 
graduate program at West Chester University, applicants must sub- 
mit scores from the Miller Analogies Test, Graduate Record 
Examination, or Graduate Management Admissions Test; an essay 
with a clear focus on career plans; and two letters of reference from 
professional supervisors that address the applicant's administrative 
potential. All application materials are to be submitted to the Office 
of Graduate Studies and Extended Education and labeled: 
"Attention, M.S.A. Application of (student's name)." Following 
receipt of these materials, the M.S.A. director will schedule an 
admissions interview with the applicant. 

Admission to M.SA. Degree Candidacy 

During the 15 semester hours of precandidacy, majors in the sport 
and athletic administration concentration must complete three of the 
administrative core courses, and two of the sport and athletic admin- 
istration core courses with a minimum GPA for these courses of 3.0. 

Requirements for the M.SA. Degree 

1. Satisfactory completion of the M.S.A. curriculum shown below 
with a minimum overall GPA of 3.0. 

2. Satisfactory performance on the written and/or oral comprehen- 
sive examination. 



34-39 semester hours 
18 semester hour? 



Curriculum 

I. Administrative Core 

ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 

II. Sport and Athletic Administration Core 15 semester hours 
KIN 513, 514, 600, 611, and 612 

nL Electives 6 semester hours 

KIN 580, 601, 602, 606, 607, 680, 681, 685, or 
other electives (under advnsement) 

Certification Program in Driver Education and Safe Living 
(Highway Safety and General Safety Education) 
A teacher's certificate may be extended to include education for safe 
living (highway safet)' and general safet)' education) by completing 
12 semester hours of course work in the Department of Kinesiology. 
Courses are scheduled during summer months only. Contact the 
coordinator for further information. 



Curriculum 

KIN 561, 660, 661, and 662 



12 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
KINESIOLOGY 

Symbol: KIN unless otherwise indicated 

513 Theories and Principles of Sport Manage- 
ment (3) This course is designed to provide an 
overview ot the management responsibilit)' of the 
sport administrator, including planning, organizing, 
staffing, directing, and controlling the sport enter- 
prise. Emphasis will be placed on personnel, financial 
concerns, facility management, and public relations. 

514 Problems and Issues in Sport Management (3) 
This course is designed to provide an overview ot 
contemporar)' problems and issues in sport manage- 
ment, including an analysis of sport trends with a 
re\Hcw ot sport-goveming agencies and organizations 
and their ;iffect on athletic department programs. 
550 Elementary Physical Education Workshop 
(3) Orientation tor the teaching ot elementar)' 



physical education. Principles and practices; 
appropriate actiWties for various grade levels. 
561 Seminar in the Four-Phase Program of 
Driver Education (3) In-service experience for driv- 
er education teachers in the classroom. Behind the 
wheel (BTW), multicar method, and simulation. 
572 Advanced Motor Learning (3) An investiga- 
tion of the theories, research, and practical appli- 
cations of the processes and conditions involved in 
the teaching and learning of physical skills. 

580 Sociological and Psychological Aspects of 
Sport and Physical Education (3) Social, psycho- 
logical, and cultural factors influencing sport and 
physical education. Discussion of pertinent issues 
and research applications. 

581 Adapted Physical Education (3) Techniques 
for a program of adapted physical education in the 
public school. Application of activities to benefit 



the child with a temporary or permanent disability. 
585 Biomechanics (3) A review of, or introduction 
to, the basic principles of biomechanics and the ap- 
plication of those principles to research and teaching. 

600 Research Methods in Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation (3) Techniques of 
research applied to the field of health, physical 
education, and recreation. 

601 Statistical Design for Research and Evalua- 
tion in Physical Education (3) The practical and 
theoretical application of the basic concepts of ele- 
mentar)' statistics as they relate to evaluative proce- 
dures, research, and teaching in physical education. 

602 Advanced Philosophy of Sport and Physical 
Education (3) Major philosophical theories of 
sport. Discussion of various conceptual, move- 
ment/aesthetic, and social-political issues. 

603 Professional Literature Seminar (3) Provides 



Leadership for Women 



students with the skills necessar)- to rc\ic\v and 
critically anal)-zc the professional literature and 
current findings in physical education; useful for 
the student planning to conduct research. 

605 Curriculum in Physical Education (3) Trends 
in health and physical education curricula at the 
elementar)-, secondarj-, and college levels. Surveys, 
reports, and analyses of curriculum practices. 

606 Research Project Seminar I (2) A course for 
master's candidates who select the report option. 
Students select a problem for the research report, 
review literature, develop procedures, and collect 
data. They are expected to complete the first three 
chapters of their research reports during Seminar 
1. PREREQ: WN 600. 

607 Research Project Seminar II (2) Master's 
candidates register tor this course after completing 
Seminar I. In this course, students complete chap- 
ters four and five of the research report. PRE- 
RF.Qi KIN 606. 

608 Thesis Seminar (3) A course for the student 
who selects the thesis option. The candidate 
selects a topic, reviews the literature, develops pro- 
cedures, and prepares a proposal acceptable to the 
thesis committee. They then register for KIN 610. 
PREREQ: KIN 600. 

609 Independent Study and Special Projects (1-3) 
Students select independent study projects and 
develop proposals. These projects may be in support 
of students' research or related to their vocations. 
The proposals must be accepted and approved by 
the coordinator of graduate studies in the semester 
prior to registration for independent study. 

610 Thesis (3) Students must register for the thesis 
after completion of KIN 608. One additional enroll- 



ment in KIN blU ma)' be .lilowed with the approval 
of the graduate coordinator PREREQ; KIN 608. 
611-612 Intern Study (3) (3) For the M.S.A. stu- 
dent in athletic administration who needs or 
desires practical experience in administering ath- 
letic programs. (The student may elect 3-6 credits 
of internship experience.) 

660 History and Philosophy of Safety Education 
and Principles of Accident Prevention (3) The 
safet\ movement in the United States. and other 
countries. The place of safety education in modem 
living; philosophies of safety-education leaders; 
accident causation and prevention (their research 
implications). Background for administering school, 
civil defense, and emergency safety programs. 

661 Contemporary Practices and Program Evalua- 
tion in Safety Education (3) Current practices, eval- 
uation of programs, and research of cnirrent literature 
in safety education. Techniques for selecting, con- 
structing, and using instruments for evaluating safe- 
ty-education programs. Problem-solving projects. 

662 Problems in Traffic and Driver Education 
(3) Contemporary curriculum and current prac- 
tices in driver and traffic education, enforcement 
of traffic laws and regulations, and engineering 
problems. Problem-solving projects. 

680 Scientific Principles of Coaching (3) Recent 
trends in theories and techniques of teaching 
sports. Mechanical principles of efficient move- 
ment. Research related to competitive perform- 
ance. Specialists ser\'e as guest panelists. 

681 Advanced Exercise Physiology (3) Clinical 
and laboratory use of exercise in evaluating, main- 
taining, and modifying human physiological 
processes: growth development, metabolism, and 



weight contriii; cardiovascular and respirator)' 
functions in health and disease; and neuromuscu- 
lar integration and performance. Stress physiology, 
and training and conditioning. 
685 Women's Exercise and Sports (3) The physi- .< 
ological, psychological, and sociological cflccts of 
exercise and sport on women. 

687 Applied Muscular Physiology (3) This course 
is designed to provide an in-depth understanding 
of the structure and fiinction of skeletal muscle and 
its responses and adaptations to exercise. 

688 Applied Cardiovascular Physiology (3) This 
course is designed to provide an in-depth under- 
standing of the mechanisms underlying cardiovas- 
cular fiinction and the effects of acute and chronic 
exercise on these mechanisms. 

691 Advanced Clinical Exercise Testing and 
Prescription (3) An in-depth study of how exercise 
is used in clinical settings for diagnostic, lehabilta- 
tive, and preventive purposes. ACSM guidelines will 
be emphasized. Designed to prepare the student for 
the ACSM certification e.\am (exercise specialist). 

692 Clinical Practicum in Exercise Science (3) 
This course provides experience in a clinical setting 
under the supervision of qualified medical staff. 
EJcperiences will include prescription and supervi- 
sion of exercise for patients in settings such as hos- 
pitals and outpatient clirucs. PREREQi Approval of 
graduate coordinator 

SERVICE COURSES 

The following courses are open to students in all 
curricula, with no prerequisite in health or physical 
education required: 

KIN 550, 561, 580, 581, 585, 605, 650, 660, 661, 
662, 680, and 685. 



Leadership for Women 

509 Main Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2180 (program adviser), 610-436-2438 (M.S.A. office), 

or 610-436-2464 (Women's Studies office) 
Dr. Millhous, Program Concentration Adviser 

E-mail: lmillhous@wcupa.edu 
Dr. Milne, Director, Master of Science in Administration 
Dr. Ramanathan, Director, Women's Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Helen Berger, Ph.D. (Sociology) 

Celia Esplugas, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 

Elizabeth Larscn, Ph.D. (English) 

Deborah Mahlstcdt, Ph.D. (Psychology) 

Geetha Ramanathan, Ph.D. (English and Director, Women's Studies) 

Arlene Rengert, Ph.D. (Geography) 

Stacey Schlau, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 

Frauke Schncll, Ph.D. (Political Science) 

Karin Volkwcin, Ph.D. (Kinesiology) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Lorraine Bernotsky, D.Phil. (Political Science) 
Virginia DaCosta, Ph.D. (Art) 
Susan Gans, Ph.D. (Psychology) 
Karen Gedge, Ph.D. (History) 



Elizabeth A. Giangiulio, M.Ed. (Educational Services and Director, 

Career Development Center) 
Anne Herzog, Ph.D. (English) 
Lisa Kirschenbaum, Ph.D. (History) 
Ruth Porritt, Ph.D. (Philosophy) 
Carolyn Sorisio, Ph.D. (English) 
Maria VanLiew, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Jen Bacon, Ph.D. (English) 
Virginia DaCosta, Ph.D. (Art) 
Juanita Comfort, Ph.D. (English) 
Karen Fitts, Ph.D. (English) 

Robin Garrett, M.S.N. (Nursing and Director, Women's Center) 
Rodney Mader, Ph.D. (English) 
Lisa Millhous, Ph.D. (Communication Studies) 
Merry G. Perry, Ph.D. (English) 
Cherisa Pollard, Ph.D. (English) 
Eleanor Shevlin, Ph.D. (English) 
LaTonya Thames-Leonard, Ph.D. (History) 
Joan Woolfrcv, Ph.D. (Philosophy) 
K. Hyocjin Yoon, Ph.D. (English) 

Leadership for women is available as a concentration within the 
master of science in administration program or as a graduate certifi- 
cate. It addresses organizational power, which sometimes is 



I )iii;uist]is 



inequitable lor men aiiJ women ot equ.il training and talent. It rec- 
ognizes that women who seek to advance to leadership positions 
often become change agents within the organization, and some- 
times within their families and community as well. 
This concentration consists of four required and two elective cours- 
es. The required courses involve reading and study of feminist per- 
spectives on initiating, responding to, and managing change. They 
examine theories and practices that clarify values. They contain 
models and strategies for resolving the conflicts and logistical 
dilemmas vital to a successful administrative career that differs from 
conventional sex role ascription of status and power. 
Students in other M.S.A. concentrations also may take these 
required courses. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ADMINISTRATION 
Concentration in Leadership for Women 

Curriculum 36 semester hours 

I. Administrative Core 18 semester hours 
ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 507 

II. Concentration Requirements 12 semester hours 
PSV 565; VVOS 530, 531, and 533 

III. Electives 6 semester hours 
The student, with the approval of the adviser, chooses two elec- 
tives appropriate to specific ciueer interests. Examples include: 
ADM 612, ENG 508, GEO 530, PSC 515 and 552, WOS 502 

and 539 
See the department listings for course titles and descriptions. 



Leadership for Women Certificate Program 

In the leadership for women certificate program, students are 
required to take the four, three-credit courses listed below and two 
electives, chosen with the help of the graduate coordinator of the 
M.S.A. leadership for women concentration. 

Curriculum 18 semester hours 

I. Required Courses 12 semester hours 
PSY 565; WOS 530. 531, and 533 

II. Electives 6 semester hours 
Two electives may be chosen under advisement form a wide vari- 
ety of graduate courses at West Chester University. Specific selec- 
tion will depend upon the student's interest and need. Among 
those students may wish to consider arc the following: 

ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, 506; BLA 501; COM 501, 503, 
504; ENG 508; MGT 511, 599; MIS 501; PSC 515; PSY 543; 
WOS 502 
See the department listings fof course titles and descriptions. 
Courses in the leadership for women certificate program are offered 
on a regular schedule during late afternoon and evening hours in 
order to minimize conflict with employment. Courses also may be 
offered on a special alternative schedule that includes weekend and 
workshop sessions. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Symbol: PSY 

565 Psychology of Women (3) Develops a scien- 
tific and ration;il understanding of the behavior 
and experience of women. 

WOMEN'S STUDIES 

Symbol: WOS 

502 Special Topics (3) In-depth study of selected 
topics in women's studies not included under 
existing, regularly offered courses. 



530 Women in Leadership: Critical Issues (3) 

Survey of the literature that defines and discusses 
critical issues for the woman leader. Some issues cen- 
ter around lifestyle choices and conflicts (loneliness, 
family pressure) and others around organizational 
barriers and alternative means to overcome them. 

531 Management of Leadership: Laboratory 
Course (3) The study and practice of alternative 
leadership modes. The course uses workshop tech- 
niques to teach speech, small-group dynamics, and 
other communication skills, and problem-solving 
strategies. 

533 Woman Executive: Research Seminar (3) A 



seminar that requires each student to complete an 
original project on the goals, problems, choices, or 
successes of women in middle- or upper-level 
management positions. The use of case studies, 
surveys, oral history, and other research techniques 
will be explored. An appropriate internship may be 
substituted for this course. 
♦ 539 Independent Study (3) A project to be 
developed independcndy by the student working 
with a specific instructor. 



♦ This tourse may be taken again for credit. 



Linguistics 

538 Main Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2269 

(Interdisciplinary Area) 

Dr. Godfrey, Coordinator 

PROFESSORS 

W. Stephen Croddv, Ph.D. (Philosophy) 
Garrett Molholt, Ph.D. (English) 
Frederick R. Patton, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 
Paul StoUer, Ph.D. (Anthropology-Sociology) 



ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Dennis L. Godfrey, Ph.D. (English) 
Charles E. Grove, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 
Cheri L. Micheau, Ph.D. (English) 
Andrea Varricchio, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 
Although West Chester presendy offers no graduate degree in lin- 
guistics, students interested in developing a concentration in this 
area may elect courses from the following list or from additional 
related courses offered by the departments of Communication 
Studies, Communicative Disorders, English, Foreign Languages, 
and Philosophy. For additional information, consult the coordinator. 



Literacy 



COURSK DESCRIPTIONS 
LINGUISTICS 

Symbol: LIN 

501 Introduction to Linguistics (3) Basic con- 
cepts of language description, classification, 
change, reconstruction, dialectology, and sociolin- 
guistics. 

503 Phonology and Morphology (3) Phonetics, 
phoncmics, morphophonemics, and the morpho- 
logical composition of words. 

504 Syntax (3) A comparative study of the various 
modern approaches to the study of grammar. 
PREREQ: ENG 575 or LIN 501. 

505 Transformational Grammar (3) Basic con- 
cepts of transtormational theory and their applica- 
tion in teaching. PREREQ: ENG 575 or LIN 501. 



506 Meaning in Language (also PHI 506) (3) 
Sec Pill 506. 

512 Descriptive Linguistics (3) Analysis of the 
phonemic, morphological, and syntactic features of 
typologically divergent languages. Procedures for 
eliciting hnguistically relevant data about a lan- 
guage fi-om a native speaker. PREREQi LIN 503. 
515 Language, Thought, and Behavior (also 
COM515)(3)SecCOM 515. 
523 PhUosophy of Language (also PHI 523) (3) 
See PHI 523. 

540 Sociolinguistics (3) The study of language in 
its social context: the ethnography of communica- 
tion; language and society, social classes, ethnic 
groups, politics, sex, and education. PREREQ^ 
LIN 501 or permission of instructor. 



555 Psycholinguistics (3) A stud) ot the relation- 
ships between language and thought. Models of 
language, communication theor); and learning 
theory. Emphasis on natural language develop- 
ment and bilingualism. 

580 Language and Culture (3) Language as an 
aspect of culture; linguistic-perceptual-cognitive cat- 
egories; social and psychological aspects of language. 
PREREQ^ LIN 501 or permission of instructor. 
583 Second Language Acquisition (SLA) (3) 
Introduction to key issues in SLA research and 
theorj'. Analysis of SLA studies in connection to 
second language teaching. Design of original 
mini-study of second language learning. PRE- 
REQ: LIN 501. 
590 Independent Study (1-3) 



Literacy 



108 Recitation Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2877 

Dr. KJetzien, Chairpenon 

Dr. Beeghly, Assistant Chairperson and Graduate Coordinator 

PROFESSORS 

Daniel Darigan, Ph.D., University of Oregon 
James Thomas Gill, Ed.D., University of Virginia 
Sharon B. KJetzien, Ph.D., Temple University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Dena Beeghly, Ed.D., University of Georgia 
Susan Caroff, Ph.D., Purdue University 
Robert J. Szabo, Ed.D., Lehigh University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Kevin W. Flanigan, Ph.D., University of Virginia 

Scott C. Greenwood, Ed.D., Lehigh University 

Sunita Nayar Mayor, Ed.D., University of Cincinnati 

Karen Nolan, Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Amy Taylor Santos, M.S., Pennsylvania State University 

JoAnn Yaworski, Ph.D., The State University of New York at Albany 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Literacy offers the master of education degree 
with a major in reading and reading specialist certification. Students 
who complete either program are recommended for Pennsylvania 
certification as a reading specialist. These programs prepare candi- 
dates to serve in reading specialist positions and as classroom teach- 
ers of reading in elementary or secondary schools. 
In 1997, the Pennsylvania State Board of Education implemented 
revisions to the Pennsylvania School Code. These revisions require 
all students who apply for Pennsylvania reading specialist certifi- 
cates to pass competency tests. 

As changes are made in requirements for reading specialist certifica- 
tion, it is the student's responsibility to satisfy the new requirements. 

Admission Requirements 

1. Applicants are expected to have an undergraduate degree from 
an accredited college or university. In addition, they must meet 
an undergraduate grade point average (GPA) entry requirement 



of 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 calculated on the last 48 credits earned. 
The total cumulative undergraduate GPA must be at least 2.8. 
Students who cannot meet this requirement must take either the 
Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or the Graduate Record 
Examination (GRE). A satisfactory score as determined by the 
department on the GRE or MAT will demonstrate a student's 
academic competence in lieu of the required GPA. 
Applicants must possess initial teaching certification. 
Applicants must submit three letters of professional recommen- 
dation. 



Formal Admission to Reading Specialist Certification 
Program (for Reading Specialist Certification Candidates) 

1. Students must meet the above program entry requirements. 

2. Students must file a form in the Certification Office listing 
required courses tor certification. 

Precandidacy Requirements (for M.Ed. Candidates Only) 

1. Students must apply for candidacy after the completion of 15 
credits. 

2. Courses required within the precandidacy period include EDR 
505, 507, 509, 512, and one additional course from the pre- 
scribed program. 

3. Students must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 during the pre- 
candidacy period. 

Degree Requirements 

In addition to meeting degree requirements of the University, the 
candidate must: 

1. Succcssfiilly complete 30 credits in literacy and six additional 
credits in professional education. Workshops will not be accepted 
to satisfy this requirement. 

2. Achieve an overall GPA of at least 3.0. 

3. Perform satisfactorily on the comprehensive examination in reading. 
Students are responsible for meeting all requirements within the 
specified time. 

The Comprehensive Examination 

Students arc eligible for the comprehensive examination when they 
have completed all reading courses and have been recommended by 
the department. The examination is given the first Saturday in 



Literacy 



February, tlic last Saturday in June, and the- first Saturday in October. 
Application for the examination must be made in writing to the 
graduate coordinator bv December 1 for the I'ehruary examination, 
April 1 for the June examination, and July 1 for the October exami- 
nation. Candidates who fail the comprehensive examination are per- 
mitted one re-examination within a two-year period. Candidates 
who fail the re-cxainination are dropped from the degree program. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN READING 
Curriculum 36 semester hours 

I. Professional Education Requirements 6 semester hours 
Two courses, chosen under advisement, from the following: 

EDA 541; EDE 551; EDF 501, 510, 589; 
EDP 550, 569; EDT 500 

II. Reading Education Requirements 30 semester hours 

EDR 505, 507, 509, 512, 514, 515, 516, 519, 
5.32, and 541 

Reading Specialist Certification 30 semester hours 

Requirements tor the certification program: 

1. The student must possess an Instructional I Certificate. 



2. Courses required within the first 15 credits are EDR 505, 507, 
509,512. 

3. The student must maintain an overall GPA of 3.0. 

4. In order to obtain the certificate, the student must successflilly 
complete the reading education courses listed as part of the 
M.Ed, in reading program. The student is not required to take 
the two courses in professional education. 

5 The student must perform successfiilly on the comprehensive 

examination. 
6. Students must pass the competency test (Praxis) required by the 

Pennsylvania Department of Education. 

Literacy Certificate 18 semester hours 

The literacy certificate is an 18-credit graduate certificate (not a 
teaching certification). Admission requirements are the same as for an 
M.Ed, in reading. Courses required are EDR 505, 507, 509, 512, 514, 
and 515. Credits earned for the literacy certificate may be applied to 
an M.Ed, in reading and/or reading specialist certification. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
READING 

Symbol: EDR 

505 Orthographic Knowledge, Language, and Lit- 
eracy Development (3) The purjiose of this course is 
to acquaint students with the development of ortho- 
graphic knowledge from its earliest awareness to its 
full fruition and its relation to language and literacy 
acquisition and instruction. Assessment strategies 
along each stage of its development \vill be explored 
as wcU as concomitant pedagogy. Attention will be 
paid to the causes of difficulties in acquiring ortho- 
graphic knowledge and to appropriate instruction. 
507 Comprehension and Vocabulary: Develop- 
ment and Instruction (3) This course introduces 
students to the theoreticiil bases ot comprehension 
and vocabulary development. Best practices in 
teaching, supporting, and assessing comprehension 
and vocabulary will be an integral part of the course. 

509 Writing Development and Instruction (3) 
Strategies for teaching the language arts. Meth- 
ods, materials, and resources for organizing cre- 
ative programs in school settings. This course is 
crosslisted as EDE 509. 

510 Foundations of Reading Instruction: K-12 (3) 
Psychology and pedagogy of reading instruction. 
The nature of the reading process, the nature of the 
learner, skill development, instructional strategies. 
512 Literacy Practicum and Seminar I (3) A lab- 
oratory course in assessment and instruction of the 
young reader/writer. Major attention given to 
understanding a child's language and literacy 
development, and planning and carrying out 
appropriate instruction for that child. Students 
will use a variety of formal and informal assess- 
ments to design an individual instructional pro- 
gram. PREREQ: EDR 505, 507, 520. 

514 Reading in the Content Areas (3) Reading 
skills, reading problems, teaching techniques, and 
reading activities in content subjects at the ele- 
mentary and secondary levels. PREREQi EDR 
505, 507, 509. 



515 Teaching Reading vnth Children's and 
Adolescents' Literature (3) Based on the philos- 
ophy that literature should be an integral element 
of reading programs. The emphasis is on fostering 
wide reading and response to literature in K-12 
reading programs. Students will learn instructional 
strategies and develop materials and a selected 
bibliography PREREQ: EDR 505, 507, 509. 

516 Problems in Literac)' Development (3) The 
purpose of this course is to acquaint the swdent with 
the theoretical bases and the nawre of differences in 
literacy development. The developmental nature of 
literacy growfth and the importance of instruction 
virithin smdents' zone of proximal development will 
be explored. Students will investigate how literacy 
differences are influenced by social, emotional, psy- 
chological, physical, and educational factors. Best 
practices in teaching, supporting, and assessing stu- 
dents with literacy' differences will be an mtegral part 
of the course. PREREQi EDR 505, 507, 509, 512. 

517 Current Practices in Teaching Develop- 
mental and Corrective Reading (3) Develop- 
mental and corrective reading instruction. Atten- 
tion is given to diagnostic procedures and resulting 
appropriate instruction. PREREQ^ EDR 510, 516. 
519 Issues ofDiversity in Teaching Reading (3) 
Historical, cultural, and educational contexts of liter- 
acy, language, and learning as they relate to reading 
instruction. PREREQ: EDR 505, 507, 509, 512. 
523 Reading as a Language Process (3) Basic 
concepts from areas of phonolog)', morphology, 
syntax, semantics, sociolinguistics, dialectology, 
and psychology will be related to the teaching of 
reading in grades K-12. 

526 Emerging Literacy and Beginning Reading: 
A Whole Language Approach (3) Concerned with 
young children's literacy development from pre- 
school through the primary grades. Emphasis on 
instructional recommendations and implementa- 
tions for a range of abilities. Included are super\'ised 
one-on-one and/or small group teaching experi- 
ences. PREREQ^ 5 10 or permission of instructor. 



532 Literacy Practicum and Seminar II (3) A lab- 
orator)' course in assessment and instruction of 
independent readers/writers. Using formal and 
informal measures, students will complete a case 
study of an independent reader/writer, analyze 
strengths and areas of need, and design an individ- 
ualized plan for literacy growth. Using this plan, 
students will tutor children and evaluate the 
results. PREREQ: EDR 516, 519. 
535 Language, Learning, and Literacy (3) The 
developmental nature of language and the critical 
links between language, learning, and literacy. 
Major theories of language and litcrac)' and links to 
practice. Individual variation, class, gender, dialect, 
and ethnicity related to language and literac)'. 

540 Seminar in Reading (3) Critical examination 
of trends, opinions, and current research in the 
teaching of reading. PREREQi EDR 516 or per- 
mission of instructor. 

541 Organization and Supervision of Literacy 
Programs: K-12 (3) Development, organization, and 
supervision of literacy programs K-12. Emphasis is 
on the use of the total school community in meeting 
indi\'idual needs. PREREQi EDR 516, 519. 

542 Seminar in Reading Research (3) A seminar in 
the basic techniques and sources of research in read- 
ing. E.xposure to significant research in the field. 
PREREQi EDR 532 or permission of instructor 
549 Theory and Trends in the Language Arts (3) 
Analysis and evaluation of language arts programs, 
including reading in the modern elementary 
school. PREREQ: EDE 548. This course is 
crosslisted as EDE 549. 

590 Independent Study (1-6) Individual investi- 
gation and exploration of related reading research. 
Topic must be approved by the supervising 
instructor prior to registration. 
591-598 Workshop in Literacy Education (1-6) 
Literacy education workshops will focus on differ- 
ent aspects of literacy' instruction. Specific topics 
will be announced in advance. 



Mathematics 



Management — See Business 
Marketing — See Business 



Mathematics 

124 /Vnderson Hall 

West Chester Universit)' 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2440 

Dr. Branton, Chairperson 

Dr. Kerrigan, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

610-4.16-2351 

PROFESSORS 

Richard G. Branton, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Gail M. Gallitano, Ed.D., Columbia University 
Frank Grosshans, Ph.D., University of Chicago 
John J. Kerrigan, D.Ed., Temple University 
Waclavv Szymanski, D.Sc, Polish Academy of Sciences 
Lin Tan, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Peter L. Gliddcn, Ph.D., Columbia University 

Shiv K. Gupta, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University 

Clifford Johnston, Ph.D., Temple University 

Frank Milliman, A.M., Columbia University 

Joseph Moser, M.S., Purdue University 

Randall H. RJeger, Ph.D., University of North Carolina 

Paul Wolfson, Ph.D., University of Chicago 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Robert Gallop, Ph.D., Drexel University 
Kathleen Jackson, Ed.D., Temple University 
Lisa Marano, Ph.D., Lehigh University 
Viorel Nitica, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Thomas H. Smith, Ed.D., Temple University 
Peter Zimmer, Ph.D., University of Kansas 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Mathematics offers the master of arts degree 
with options in mathematics and mathematics education, the master 
of science degree in applied statistics, and a certificate in applied 
statistics. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN MATHEMATICS 

The mathematics opti<5n is for students interested in furthering 
their mathematical background. It provides the foundation for con- 
tinued work in mathematics leading to the Ph.D. in mathematics. 
The mathematics education option is directed to teachers of mathe- 
matics who wish to strengthen their background in mathematics 
and mathematics education; in addition, it provides the foundation 
for doctoral programs in mathematics education. 

Admission to the M.A. Program 
Mathematics Education Option 

In addition to meeting the basic admission requirement of the 
University, applicants must have a bachelor's degree with a mathe- 
matics major. Applicants must schedule an interview with the grad- 
uate coordinator prior to enrollment. Deficiencies, as determined by 
the graduate coordinator, may be removed by successfully complet- 
ing appropriate course(s). Applicants must submit scores for the 
general section of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). 



Mathematics Option 

In addition to meeting the basic admission requirements of the 
Univcrsir\', applicants must schedule an interview with the graduate 
coordinator prior to enrollment. Applicants must have a minimum 
of 30 semester hours of mathematics, including a fiill treatment of 
calculus, at least one advanced undergraduate course in modern 
algebra, and one in advanced calculus. Deficiencies in these areas 
may be removed by successfully completing appropriate courses. 
Applicants must submit scores for the general section of the GRE. 

Requirements for the M.A. Degree 

In addition to completing the course requirements shown below, candi- 
dates must either pass a comprehensive examination or submit a thesis. 

Mathematics Education Option 33 semester hours 

One three-credit course in each: 12 semester hours 

MTE507, 508, 512, 604 
One three-credit course in each: 15 semester hours 

MAT 515, 521, 532, 545, and STA 505 
Two three-credit electives: 6 semester hours 

One to be a continuation of real analysis, algebra, or geometry. 

One to be chosen from: 

MAT 503, 514, 516, 533, 546, 570, 575, or STA 506 
(Elective courses to be scheduled in advance on a rotating basis.) 

Mathematics Option 33 semester'hours 

One three-credit course in each: 18 semester hours 

MAT 515, 516, 545, 546, 575 and an approved 
course in statistics or applied mathematics 
MAT or STA electives 15 semester hours 

Chosen from the MAT or STA course offerings below (except 
MAT 503 and MAT 541) after 27 credits have been completed, 
the student selects either two more courses or the thesis option 
and then takes the two thesis courses listed below. 

Applied Statistics 

Dr. Rieger, Program Director 

Vital to a wide variet\' of disciplines, applied statisticians have found 
employment in pharmaceuticiil research and development, govern- 
ment public policy, economic forecasting and an;ilvsis, psychomet- 
rics, public health resarch, and many other areas. The mission of the 
program in applied statistics is to train students to possess the skills 
necessary for immediate employment and/or provide a course of 
study that would make further (doctoral) study in statistics, biosta- 
tistics, biomathematics, or other related fields feasible. The program 
provides strong training in statistical analysis and proramming, 
design of scientific studies, and the ability to communicate statisti- 
cal concepts. 

Admission to the M.S. Program 

In addition to meeting the basic admission requirements ot the 
University, applicants must have knowledge of calculus and linear 
;i]gebra. Deficiencies, as determined by the program director, may be 
removed by successfliUy completing appropriate course(s). 
Borderline candidates for admission may be required to present 
GRE scores at the discretion of the program director. 



Mathematics 



Admission to the Certificate Option 

In addition to meeting fhc basic admission requirements of the 
I Iniversity, applicants must have at least one undergraduate level (or 
higher) course in statistics. Deficiencies, as determined by the pro- 
gram director, may be removed by succcsstlilly completing an appro- 
priate course. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED STATISTICS 

LIpon admission to the program, students will be allowed to select the 
thesis or nonthesis track for the M.S. in applied statistics. The thesis 
option replaces one of the elective classes and STA 531 with a six-cred- 
it thesis, to be initiated after the completion of STA 505 and STA 506. 

Curriculum 35 semester hours 

Nonthesis Option 

1. Required 



STA 505, 506, 507, 511, 512, 513, 514, and 531 



II. Electives 



26 semester hours 
9 semester hours 



1 hree courses troni a selected area ot concentration 
or STA 601 and two additional three-credit electives 
from a selected area of concentration 

Thesis Option 

I. Required 29 semester hours 
STA 505, 506, 507, 511, 512, 513, 514, 609, and 610 

II. Electives 6 semester hours 
Two courses from a selected area of concentration 

or STA 601 and one additional three-credit elective 
from a selected area of concentration 



CertiHcate in Applied Statistics 

Curriculum 

I. Required 
STA 507, 511, 512, 514 

II. Electives 6 semester hours 
Two courses from a selected area of concentration 



19 semester hours 
13 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MATHEMATICS 

Symbol: MAT 

503 History of Mathematics (3) Development of 
mathematics from prehistoric time to present. 
Emphasis on changes in the mainstreams of 
mathematical thought through the ages. 

513 Linear Algebra (3) Vectors, vector spaces, 
determinants, linear transformations, matrices, and 
bilinear and quadratic forms. 

514 Theory of Numbers (3) Elemcntar)' number 
thcori' and selected topics in analytic number theory. 

515 Algebra I (3) Elements of abstract algebra, 
groups, commutative ring theory, modules, and 
associative .ligebras over commutative rings. 

516 Algebra II (3) A continuation of MAT 515. 
Vector spaces, representation theory, and Galois 
theory. PREREQ: MAT 515. 

521 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory 
(3) Techniques ot problem solving, including the 
use ot binomial coetTicients, generating functions, 
recurrence relations, the principle of inclusion 
exclusion, and Polya's Theorem. 

532 Geometry I (3) This course is a rigorous 
introduction to geometry from a transformational 
point ot view, emphasizing Euclidean, hvpcrbolic, 
and/or projective geometry. Other topics such as 
Spherical geometry', symplectic geometry, or 
Aflfine geometry may be included if time permits. 

533 Geometry II (3) A study of geometry using 
calculus as our main tool. The course covers the 
basics ot ditlercntial geometry — parametrizations, 
tangent spaces, cur\ature, geodesies — leading to 
Stokes theorem and the Gauss-Bonnett theorem. 
Several examples will be studied in depth, includ- 
ing the sphere and the projective plane (which 
were introduced in the first course). 

535 Topology (3) A rigorous treatment of fdters, 
nets, separation axioms, compactness, connected- 
ness, and uniform spaces. 
541 Advanced Calculus (3) For students with 
background deficiencies in analysis. Ordinary and 
uniform limits; sequences of functions; and the 
Riemann integral. 

545 Real Analysis I (3) A rigorous study of real- 
valued flinctions of real \-ariables. PREREQi 
MAT 541 or equivalent. 

546 Real Analysis II (3) Continuation of MAT 
545.PREREciMAT545. 

570 Mathematical Models in the Life, Physical, 



and Social Sciences (3) Techniques and rationales 
of model building. Applications to the life, physi- 
cal, and social sciences. 

572 Proseminar (3) Seminar in generating and 
solving problems in mathematics. 
575 Complex Analysis I (3) A rigorous study of 
comple.x-valued functions of complex variables. 
593 Topics in the History of Mathematics (3) 
Specialized topics in the history ot mathematics 
announced at the time of offering. PREREQl 
Permission of instructor. 

595 Topics in Mathematics (3) Topics announced 
at time of offering. PREREQ^ Permission of 
instructor. Offered as needed. 
599 Independent Study (1-3) Offered as needed. 

609 Thesis I (3) Conduct litcrawre search, develop 
thesis proposal, and begin research under the 
guidance of a mathematics faculty member. 
Offered as needed. 

610 Thesis II (3) Carry out research proposal 
developed in MAT 609 and present results to 
committee. Develop a graduate-level thesis under 
the guidance of the Department of Mathematics. 
Oflered as needed. 

MATHEMATICS EDUCATION 

Symbol: MTE 

501 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics I (3) 

Selected topics that reflect the spirit and the con- 
tent of the modern elementary school mathematics 
programs. Logic, sets, functions, number systems, 
integers, number theory, rational numbers, and 
problem solving, including estimations and approx- 
imations, proportional thinking, and percentages. 

502 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics II 
(3) A continuation of MTE 501 . The real number 
system, probability, statistics, gcometr\', measure- 
ment, and problem solving. PREREQ: MTE 501. 

507 Foundations of Secondary Mathematics 
Education (3) Research methods in mathematics 
education; forces which have shaped mathematics 
education; classroom implications of 20th-century 
learning theorists; assessment in the classroom; 
methods of organizing for instruction; cultural and 
gender considerations. 

508 Junior High School Mathematics — 
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (3) 
This course will focus on the curricula, methods of 
instruction, and assessment techniques used to 
teach mathematics in a junior high school setting. 
Course topics will include elementary school 



mathematics from the perspective of a secondary 
school teacher, junior high school mathematics, 
algebra I, and general/consumer mathematics. 
Teachers also will explore strategies that can be 
used to integrate the calculator and computer into 
the mathematics classroom. PREREQ^ MTE 507 
for students in the M.A. program. 
510 Algebra for the Elementary Teacher (3) An 
introduction to modern algebra. A comparative study 
of mathematics systems. PREREQ^MTE 501 or 
equivalent. 

512 Senior High School Mathematics — 
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment (3) TTiis 
course will focus on the curricula, methods of 
instruction, and assessment techniques used to teach 
mathematics in a senior high school setting. Course 
topics \viU include geometries, algebra 11, trigonom- 
etry, precalculus, and discrete mathematics. Teachers 
also will explore strategies that can be used to inte- 
grate the scientific and graphing calculator and 
computer into the mathematics classroom. PRE- 
REQ; MTE 507 for students in the'M.A. program. 
530 Geometry for the Elementary Teacher (3) 
Basic concepts in geometry. Euclidean geometry 
and postulative systems. PREREQ; MTE 501 or 
equivalent. 

551 Mathematics for Diverse Learners (3) 
Examination of current programs in mathematics 
for students with special needs; discussion of the 
pertinent research literature; and development of 
materials and techniques for these students. 

553 Teaching Elementary School Mathematics I 
(3) In-depth treatment of strategies, methods, and 
materials for teaching the following concepts in an 
elementary classroom: place value; addition, sub- 
traction, multiplication, and division of whole 
numbers; measurement; elementary number theo- 
ry; geometry; fractions; and integers. PREREQ; 
MTE 501 or equivalent. 

554 Teaching Elementary School Mathematics 
II (3) History and development of the modern 
elementary school mathematics programs. 
Theories and findings of recent and contemporary 
learning theorists are investigated. Modern organi- 
zational strategies sur\eyed, including team teach- 
ing, individualized instruction, open space, con- 
temporary instruction strategies, such as individu- 
alized learning systems, mathematical laboratories, 
and individually prescribed instruction, are stud- 
ied. PREREQ:' MTE 553. 

561 Calculus for Teachers (3) Analytic geometry 
of both the straight line and conies, and elements 



Music 



of the calculus of functions of a single real variable 
are reviewed. Topics include limits, continuit); the 
derivative and intcgrid and their applications, 
curve sketching, and polar coordinates. Emphasis 
on methods of teaching these topics to secondary 
school students. 

562 Computer .Applications for Elementary and 
Middle School Mathematics (3) This technolo- 
gy-driven approach to teaching elementani' school 
mathematics will include activities designed to 
enable teachers to use content-oriented software, 
spreadsheets, and graphic tools in the development 
of lessons involving mathematical applications. 
Emphasis will focus on teacher participation in 
simulations dcaUng with student-thinking skills. 
595 Topics in Mathematics Education (3) Topics 
announced at time of offering. PREREQ^ 
Permission of instructor. Offered as needed. 
599 Independent Study (1-3) 
604 Research Seminar (3) This course will focus 
on the studv of research in mathematics education. 
Contemporar)' topics of research will be discussed 
and perused. Students will be expected to report on 
a topic of research of their choosing. In addition, 
empirical study and design will be discussed along 
with data analysis and the reporting of results. 
610 Thesis (3-6) 

APPLIED STATISTICS 

Symbol: STA 

505 Mathematical Statistics I (3) A rigorous 
mathematical treatment of the underlying theory 
of probability and statistical inference. Probability 



spaces, discrete and continuous distribution theory, 
functions of random variables. Central Limit 
Theorem, and other topics. 

506 Mathematical Statistics 11 (3) Continuation 
of STA 505. Point estimation, hypothesis tests, 
confidence intervals, asymptotic properties of esti- 
mators, and other topics. 

507 Introduction to Categorical Data Analysis 
(3) Data-driven introduction to statistical tech- 
niques for analysis of categorical data arising from 
a variety of studies. Contingency tables, logistic 
regression survival models, nonparametric meth- 
ods, and other topics. 

511 Introduction to Statistical Computing (3) 
Course will give students the abllit)' to effectively 
manage and manipulate data, conduct statistical 
analysis, and generate reports and graphics, prima- 
rily using the SAS Statistical Software Package. 

512 Principles of Experimental Analysis (4) 
Course provides technology-driven introduction to 
regression and other common statistical multivari- 
able modeling techniques. Emphasis on interdisci- 
plinary applications. 

513 Intermediate Linear Models (4) Rigorous 
mathematical and computational treatment of lin- 
ear models. 

514 Modern Experimental Design (3) Focusing 
on recent journal articles, this course will investi- 
gate issues associated with design of various stud- 
ies and experiments. Pharmaceutical clinical trials, 
case-control studies, cohort studies, survey design, 
bias, caysality, and other topics. 



531 Topics in Applied Statistics (3) Topics of cur- 
rent interest in research and industry announced at 
time of offering. 

601 Internship in Applied Statistics (3-6) In coop- 
eration with a regional industrial company student 
will perform an internship in applied statistics. 
609 Thesis I (3-6) Preliminar)' research under the 
guidance of a mathematics faculty member. 
Students must present oral preliminary fmdings 
before proceeding to STA 610. 
610 Thesis II (3-6) Research project under the 
guidance of the mathematics faculty. 

SERVICE COURSES IN 

MATHEMATICS 

MATHENL\TICS EDUCATION (MTE) 

501 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics I 

502 Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics II 
510 /Vlgebra for the Elementary Teacher 

550 Topics in Mathematics for Elementary 

School Teachers 
553 Teaching Elementary School Mathematics I 
558 Teaching Mathematics in the Junior High 

School 

560 Teaching Algebra in the Secondary School 

561 Calculus for Teachers 

562 Computer Applications for Elementary 
School Mathematics 

STATISTICS (STA) 

521 Statistics 1 



Music 

Dr. Blair, Dean 

Dr. Burton, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

610-436-2222 or 436-2739 

Note: Effective July 1, 2004, the School of Music became part of 

the College of Visual and Performing Arts with the departments of 

Applied Music (combining the areas of instrumental, keyboard, and 

vocal/choral music); Music Education; Music History and 

Literature; and Music Theory/Composition. 

Mission 

The mission of the School of Music at West Chester University is 
to create a learning environment that provides the highest order of 
education in all major aspects of music, to establish a foundation for 
life-long growth in music, and to offer programs and degrees that 
are tradition based but fiiture oriented. In pursuing this mission, we 
rcafFirm our commitment to diversity within the School of Music. 
Our faculty members strive to be inspiring teachers as well as musi- 
cal and intellectual leaders. Further, we endeavor to expand the 
music opportunities available to all University students and to 
enhance the quality of our community's musical life. 

Programs of Study 

The School of Music offers programs leading to the master of arts 
degree in music history, and the master of music degree in music 
education, performance, accompanying, music theory/composition, 
and piano pedagogy. Course selections to meet degree requirements 
are made by candidates in consultation with their advisers and with 
consideration of the candidates' goals, abilities, needs, and interests. 



Samuel Barber Insritute for Music Educators 

The Samuel Barber Institute for Music Educators offers an innova- 
tive combination of traditional academic courses and special subjects 
seminars featuring nationally renowned leaders in 21st century 
music education. These courses maybe applied to NASM-accredit- 
ed master's degrees in music education, applied music, piano peda- 
gogy, music history and literature, and music theory as well as meet- 
ing requirements for teacher certification renewal and professional 
growth. Master's degrees in the School of Music may be earned 
through an intensive four summer program or a combination of reg- 
ular semester and summer studies. Contact the coordinator of grad- 
uate studies for details on these programs. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
degree program at West Chester University, music applicants are 
considered on the basis of academic record, interviews, School of 
Music Graduate Entrance Examination, portfolio review in compo- 
sition, and auditions for performance programs. 
Prior to enrollment all applicants must (1) Possess appropriate 
undergraduate degrees and may he required to remedy not more 
than 12 credits of deficiency (2) Schedule interviews with the grad- 
uate coordinator and appropriate department chairperson in the 
School of Music. 

The areas of concentration, directed electives, and free electives are 
described fiiUy in a student handbook compiled by, and available 
from, the graduate coordinator of the School of Music. 



Music: Applied Music 



Durjiij;; the first semester or summer session in which graduate 
music courses arc taken, each graduate student must take the School 
of Music Graduate Entrance Examination. This examination will be 
administered twice each semester and twice during the summer ses- 
sion to allow the greatest degree ot accessibility for students and to 
facilitate student progress through degree curricula. 
The examination will assess student competencies in music history/lit- 
erature and music theory including skills and knowledge of two areas: 
(1) Music history/literature - styles, forms, and genres of all major peri- 
ods of music histon', representative composers and their works, and 
philosophical ;uid societal issues relating to music liistory. This knowl- 
edge will be assessed through a combination of written questions and 



aural listening exam. (2) Music theory' - music terminology, part-writ- 
ing techniques, analysis of harmonic and melodic structures, basic 
-.uranging and composition, and aural skills. These skills and knowledge 
will be assessed through a combination ot written and aural questions. 
Contact the graduate coordinator for the School of Music for test 
dates and registration forms for the School of Music Graduate 
Entrance Examination. 

Each degree candidate is individually responsible for satisfying degree 
candidacy and graduation requirements stated elsewhere in this catalog 
and for meeting deadline dates for the May, August, or December gradu- 
ation, as appropriate. 



Applied Music 

(Formerly the departments of Instrumental, Keyboard, and Vocal/Choral Music) 



Dr. Villella, Chairperson 

Dr. Greenlee, Assistant Chairperson 

Dr. Wyss, Assistant Chairperson 

PROFESSORS 

Robert M. Bedford, D.Mus., Catholic University of America 

Raymond Friday, Ph.D., New York University 

Henry Grabb, D.M., Florida State University 

Kenneth L. Laudermilch, D.M.A., Catholic University of America 

Robert E. Pennington, Y).^\\is., Northwestern University 

David Sprenkle, D.M.A., University of Maryland - College Park 

Richard K. Veleta, D.Mus., Northwestern University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Sylvia Moss Ahramjian, M.M., Indiana University 

Kathryn Chilcote, D.M.A., University of Oregon 

Da\'id DeVennev, D.M.A., Conservatory of Music, University of 

Cincinnati 
W. Larry Dorminy, D.M., Indiana University 
Chris Manning, D.M.A., University of Colorado 
John Villella, Ed.D., Widener University 
Jane Wyss, D.M.A., University of Texas at Austin 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Emily Bullock, D.M.A., University of Colorado 

Anita Greenlee, M.S., The Juilliard School 

Carol Isaacson-BriseUi, M.M., Temple University 

Theresa Klinefelter, M.M., Temple University 

Glenn Lyons, M.Mus., Peabody Conservatory of Music of Johns 

Hopkins University 
Owen Metcalf, D.M., Indiana University 
Jane Richter, D.M.A., Combs College 
Gregory Riley, D.MA., University of Southern California 

INSTRUCTORS 

John R. Gaarder, MM., New England Conservatory of Music 

Gloria Galantc, B.S., West Chester University 

Frank Kaderabak, Retired Principal Trumpet, Philadelphia Orchestra 

Paula Nelson, D.M., University of North Texas 

Peter Paulsen, NLAL, Temple University 

MASTER OF MUSIC IN PERFORMANCE 

(30 semester hours) 

The program requires completion of three credits in music history 
and three credits in music theory, as weU as one of the concentra- 
tions described below. 



Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to degree 
programs in music, performance applicants must (1) schedule an 
interview with the graduate coordinator and the department chair- 
person; (2) submit a repertoire list; and (3) demonstrate perform- 
ance ability at an advanced level by performing for an audition com- 
mittee. Vocal performance applicants must audition with a program, 
including selections drawn from Italian art song, German Lied, 
French melodic, opera, and oratorio as weO as demonstrate diction 
competency in Italian, German, and French. Students lacking nine 
credtis of undergraduate foreign language must remove this defi- 
cience before candidacv. 



Instrumental concentration: Nine credits in individual lessons at 
the advanced level (XXX 541-43) and Recital (AIM 697); AES 511 
(chamber ensemble); 5-6 concentration credits (selected from AIC 
512, and courses with ALC prefix); three credits in music history; 
three credits in music theory; 6-7 credits of free electives; and com- 
pletion of a comprehensive exit examination. 

Keyboard concentration (piano, harpsichord, or organ): Nine cred- 
its in individual lessons at the advanced level (HAR/ORG/ PIA 
541-43); six credits in keyboard literature (PIA 623-627) or organ 
literature (ORG 551-552); three credits of concentration electives 
from KEN 546, MAK 558, ORG 561-62, PIA 572-73, or PIA 
582-83; three or four credits of free electives; two credits of recital 
(HAR 697, ORG 697, PIA 697); and completion of a comprehen- 
sive exit examination. 

Voice Concentration: Nine credits in individual lessons at the 
advanced level (VOI 541-43) and a recital (VOI 697); VOC 524 
(three credits); 4-6 credits (selected from VOC 511-16, 526, 529, 
and 591, and MHL 654), 4-6 credits of fi-ee electives; and comple- 
tion of a comprehensive exit examination. 

MASTER OF MUSIC IN ACCOMPANYING 

(30 semester hours) 

Adnussion Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to degree 
programs in music, accompanying applicants must (1) submit tran- 
scripts showing completion of a bachelor's degree in music, includ- 
ing six semester hours of a foreign language (French, German, or 
Italian preferred) and (2) demonstrate accompanying ability at an 
advanced level bv performing for an audition committee. 
Area of Concentration: Four credits in individual lessons at the 
advanced level (PIA 570-71); eight credits of ensemble (PIA 574- 
75); nine credits in cognate courses (PIA 572-73, 576-77); and three 



Music: Applied Music 



credits in tree clectives (V'OC 511-14, VOC 515-16 preferred); three 
fuU recitals (0 credit); three credits in music history; three credits in 
music theory; and completion of a comprehensive exit examination. 
Until fiirther notice, no new students are being admitted into the 
master of music in accompanying. 

MASTER OF MUSIC IN PIANO PEDAGOGY 

(36 semester hours) 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to degree pro- 
grams in music, piano pedagogy applicants must schedule an entrance 



exammation, which will consist ot scales, arpeggios, solo repertoire 
firom various stylistic periods, and sight reading. Applicants whose 
undergraduate degrees are not in music may be accepted into the pro- 
gram if they demonstrate equivalent background in piano. 
Area of Concentration: Eight credits in individual lessons (PIA 
578-79, PIA 588-89); fifteen credits in piano pedagogy (PIA 580- 
83); six credits in keyboard literature (PIA 623-27); a recital (PIA 
695) for one credit; three credits in music history; three credits in 
music theory; and completion of a comprehensive exit examination. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 
INDIVIDUAL LESSONS: Prefixes: BAR, 
BAS. BSN, CLT, FLU, FRH, GTR, HRP 
OBO, PER, SAX, TBA, TPT, TRB, VCL, 
VLA, VLN 

501-02 Lessons at the Minor (beginning) Level (1) 
511-14 Lessons at the Major Level (1) 
541-43 Lessons at the Advanced Level (3) 
For performance majors only. 
AEB511 Marching Band (I) 
AEB521 Concert Band (1) 
AEB53I SvmphonicBandd) 
AEB541 Wind Ensemble (1) 
AEO 531 Chamber Orchestra (1) 
AEO 541 Symphony Orchestra (1) 
AES 511 Recital - Instrumental Ensemble (2) 
Program selection, recruitment of players, rehears- 
al, and performance of music for small instrumen- 
tal ensembles. 

AES 512 Instrumental Ensemble (1) 

AlC 512 Advanced Instrumental Conducting 

(2) PREREQ^ Undergraduate conducting. 

AIM 511 Marching Band Techniques and 
Materials (3) A survey of the (unction of the total 
marching band and of each component in the band. 
AIM 679-80 Special Subjects Seminar- Instru- 
mental (1-3) Instrumental music topics presented 
by faculty and/or visiting lecturers. 
AIM 681-83 Independent Study in Music (1-3) 
AIM 696 Recital - Instrument (1) For music 
education majors in lieu of research report. PRE- 
REQ^Jury exam. 

AIM 697 Recital - Instrument (1) For perform- 
ance majors. PREREQ^Jury exam. 
INSTRUMENTAL LITERATURE COURS- 
ES: A sur\'cy of solo, ensemble, and teaching liter- 
ature through performance and the use of scores 
and recordings. 

ALC 511 Brass Literature (3) 
ALC 512 Bra.ss Literature 1 (1) 
ALC 513 Brass literature 2(1) 
ALC 514 Brass Literature 3(1) 
ALC 522 Guitar Literature 1 (1) 
ALC 524 Guitar Literature 3 (1) 
ALC 532 String Literature I (1) 
ALC 533 String Literature 2 (1) 
ALC 534 String Literature 3 (I) 
ALC 542 Woodwind Literature 1 (1) 
ALC 543 Woodwind Literature 2 (1) 
ALC 544 Woodwind Literature 3(1) 
ALC 551 Instrumental Literature (3) 



ALC 552 Percussion Literatuie 1 (1) 
ALC 553 Percussion Literature 2 (1) 
ALC 554 Percussion Literature 3 (1) 
MASTER CLASSES: Performance techniques and 
stylistic interpretation of instrumental solo works. 
PRERECi. Performance abilit)' at the major level. 
AMC511 Master Class- Brass (1) 
AMC 521 Master Class - Percussion (1) 
AMC531 Ma.ster Class- Strings (1) 
AMC 541 Master Class- Woodwind (1) 
MWB 536-39 Marching Band Workshop ( I -3) A 
comprehensive marching band conference for the 
total marching band program. Foremost authorities 
offer instruction in their fields of specialization. 

KEYBOARD MUSIC 

Symbol: HAR, KEN, MAK, MWP, ORG, 
PIA 

501-2 Individual Lessons at the Minor Level in 
Piano, Organ, Harpsichord (1) Individual, half- 
hour lessons once weekly. An elective course for all 
graduate students. 

511-14 Individual Lessons at the Major Level in 
Piano and Organ (1) Individual half-hour lessons. 
Continued study in the development of repertoire 
and performing skills. Students may be given per- 
mission to register for two course numbers in the 
same semester, earning the second credit by doing 
additional outside work and performing in a 
recital. PREREQ^ Completion of the performance 
major requirements at the undergraduate level or 
admission by audition. 

PLV 525 Piano Technique (3) An exploration of 
the many approaches to acquiring and teaching 
piano technique, the correlation between tech- 
nique and musical style, how to practice and ana- 
lyze physiological movements. 
541-43 Individual Lessons at the Advanced 
Level in Piano, Organ, and Harpsichord (3) 
Individual, half-hour lessons once weekly. 
Advanced studies leading to a full-length recital at 
the master's level. PREREQ; Completion of the 
performance major requirements for the bachelor 
of music degree or admission by audition. 
MWP 536-539 Piano Workshop (1-3) 
MWS 536-539 Contemporary Applications of 
Keyboard Synthesizers (3) ,\ hands-on workshop 
involving programming techniques for synthesiz- 
ers and the study of MIDI networks. Performance 
and composition will be emphasized. 
KEN 546 Keyboard Ensemble (2) Performance 
of duet and two-piano litcranirc. 
ORG 551 Organ Literature I (3) A survey of lit- 
erature for the organ from the 13th ccnniry to the 
Baroque period. TTie influence of the organ on the 
literature. Recordings and performance by organ 
majors. 



ORG 552 Organ Literature II (3) A survey of 
literature for the organ from J.S. Bach to the pres- 
ent. The influence of the organ on the Uterature. 
Recordings and performance by organ majors. 
ORG 553 Advanced Organ Pedagogy (3) 
MAC 558 Master Class (Organ) (1-2) 

MAK 558 Master Class (Keyboard) (1-2) Weekly 

performance sessions for advanced students. 

ORG 561 Accompanying (Organ) (3) 

Performance of vocal and instrumental accompa- 
nying hterature for organ from all periods. 
Performance and reading sessions. 
ORG 562 Service Playing (Organ) (3) A survey 
of problems in service plaving for the organist. 
HjTnn accompaniment, improvisation, conducting 
from the organ, and literature for the service. 
Observation of service playing when possible. 
PIA 570-71 Individual Lessons at the Advanced 
Level for Accompanists (2) Individual, half-hour 
lessons once a week to train pianists in plaWng 
accompaniments. PREREQ^ Admission to the 
MM. degree in accompan\'ing. 
PL\ 572-73 Accompanying I, Vocal II, 
Instrumental (3) Survey of accompan)'ing Utera- 
ture; (1) art songs, recitatives, cantata, opera, and 
oratorio arias; and (II) strings, winds, and brass. 
Performance and reading in class. 
PIA 574-75 Ensemble I, II (4) Accompanying in 
teaching studios for large groups (choruses), for 
various ensembles (including trios and quartets), 
•^and for faculty, B.M., M.M., general, and senior 
student recitals. 

PIA 576 Harpsichord and Continuo Realization 
(1) .'\n introduction to harpsichord plaving and 
the principles of continuo realization. 
PIA 577 Transposition and Score Reading (2) 
Training in score reading and transposition at the 
keyboard. 

PIA 578 Individual, one-hour lessons for stu- 
dents of piano pedagogy (2) PREl^Q^ 
.'\dmission to the pcdagog)' concentration. 
PIA 579 Individual, one-hour lessons for stu- 
dents of piano pedagogy (2) 
PIA 580 Group Piano Pedagogy (4) Procedures 
and matcri;ils for group piano instruction. 
Emphasis on developing comprehensive musician- 
ship through an interwoven study of literature, 
musical analysis, technique, improvisation, ear 
training, harmony, transposition, and sight reading. 
Includes practicum in group piano instruction. 
PIA 581 Piano Pedagogy I (4) An in-depth study 
of materials available to the studio piano teacher for 
the elementary levels. Discussions include different 
methods, technique, harmony, ear training, and sight 
reading. Includes practicum in indi\idual instruction. 
PLA 582 Piano Pedagogy II (4) .'Vn in-depth study 
of repertoire and materials available to the studio 



Music: Music Education 



jiiano tciu'hcr for the iiiicriTicdiatc IcvcU. Discusskhis 
of related concern's, such as memorization, practice 
techniques, developing technique through literature, 
principles of fingering, and sight reading. Includes 
practicum in individual instruction. 
Pl/\ 583 Selected Topics in Piano Pedagogy (3) 
Further exploration of the goals and objectives of 
piano study through presentation of selected topics 
and continued practicum in individual instruction. 

588 Advanced Lessons (2) Individual one-hour 
lessons once weekly, for students in the M.M. in 
piano pedagogy degree. 

589 Advanced Lessons (2) Individual one-hour 
lessons once weekly, for students in the M.M. in 
piano pedagogy degree. 

PIA 608 The Music of Chopin (3) A compre- 
hensive studv of the contributions ot Frederic 
Chopin to keyboard litcrattire. 
PL\ 611 The Piano Concerto (3) A chronological 
presentation of the development of the piano con- 
certo; performances, problems, and practices will be 
emphasized. Covers trom j.S. Bach to present. 
PL\ 623 Baroque Keyboard Literature (3) The 
Renaissance through development ot variation 
form and dance suite. Emphasis on performance 
practices, realizing ornament signs and figured 
basses; transferral to the modern piano; in-depth 
study of works of Handel, J.S. Bach, and D. 
Scarlatti. Some student performance required. 
PIA 624 Classical Piano Literature (3) Literature 
(ot the early piano (1750-1830). Origin and develop- 
ment ot the sonata and performance practices o{ ho- 
mophonic style. Music of the sons of Bach, Haydn, 
Mozart, and Beethoven. Sound and structure of the 
early piano. Some student pertonnancc required. 
PIA 625 Romantic Piano Literature (3) Analysis 
of piano styles ot Schubert, Chopin, Mendelssohn, 
Schumann, Liszt, Brahms, Faure, Mussorgsky, 
Tchaikovsky, and Grieg. Performance practices. The 
virtuoso etude and problems of technical execution. 
Some student performance required. PREREQ; 
PIA 426 (Keyboard Literature II) or equivalent. 
PIA 626 20th-century Piano Literature (3) 
Semin;il works and styles ot this century. Albeniz, 
Rachmaiunoff, Debussy, Ravel, Prokotiev, Hinde- 
mith, Schoenberg, Bartok, and American composers. 
Some student performance required. PREREQ^ 
MTC 213 (TTieory of Music IV) or equivalent. 
PIA 679-680 Special Subjects Seminar (1-3) 
Significant topics presented by faculty members or 
visiting lecturers. Designed to meet specific needs 
of the seminar group. 

PIA 681-683 Independent Study in Music (1-3) 
PIA 695 Recital (1) A tuU recital of concert 
works or pedagogical pieces, or a lecture-recital. 
Required of candidates for the master of music in 



piuMu pedagogy. I'RERF.Q^ Approval by commit- 
tee examination. 

PLA 696 Recital (1) A shared (halO recital open 
to candidates tor the master ot music degree 
(music education concentration). In lieu of 
research report. Program notes required. PRE- 
REQ; Approval by committee examination. 
PIA 697 Recital (2) A tiiU public recital, demon- 
strating an understanding ot various performance 
styles and an ability to perform literature from 
several periods. Required of candidates for the 
master of music in performance. PREREQ; 
Approval by committee examination. 

VOCAL/CHORAL 

Symbol; CHO 

511 Masterworlcs Chorus (1) A large mixed cho- 
rus presenting oratorios, masses, and advanced- 
level choral literature. Permission of instructor 

611 Chamber Choir (1) A consort of 15-25 
singers specializing in the performance of sacred 
and secular vocal music of the Renaissance and 
early Baroque periods. By audition. 

612 Concert Choir (1) A mixed chorus of 35-45 
singers performing sacred and secular choral liter- 
ature of all periods and styles. By audition. 

Symbol: VOC 

511 Master Class — Baroque (1) Discussion and 

performance of songs from the Baroque period. 

512 Master Class — German Lied(\) Discussion 
and performance of German art song. 

513 Masterclass — French M<r/o</K(l) Dis- 
cussion and performance of late French art song. 

514 Masterclass — 20th-century Art Song (1) 
Discussion and performance of art songs trom the 
20th century. 

515 English-Italian Diction (2) English, Italian, 
and Latin diction in a laboratory course to establish 
correct pronunciarion in singing. The phonetics of 
these languages are used in selected song repertoire. 

516 French-German Diction (3) French and 
German diction in a laboratory course to establish 
correct pronunciation in singing. The phonetics of 
these languages are used in selected song repertoire. 
524 Musico-Dramatic Production (3) 
Techniques of producing musical plays. 
Preparation for roles, coaching, and conducting 
rehearsals. May lead to a public performance of 
the material studied. 

526 Choral Literature (3) Examples of choral 

music from the various musical periods. Primarily 

larger works. 

529 Vocal Literature (3) Classic song literature, 

lieder, melodic, and contemporary art songs are 

discussed. 



536-39 Vocal/Choral Workshops (1-3) Participa- 
tion-oriented workshops designed to meet specific 
needs in vocal/choral music. 
546 Vocal Ensemble (2) Self-study in the per- 
formance and preparation of small ensembles. 
Project must have the approval of the department 
chairperson. 

591 Vocal Pedagogy (3) Principles and techniques 
of teaching voice. 

613 Advanced Choral Conducting (2) Study and 
application of advanced choral conducting techniques. 
679 Special Subjects Seminar (1-3) Significant 
topics presented by faculty or visiting lecturers. 

681 Independent Study (1) 

682 Independent Study (2) 

683 Independent Study (3) 

691 Research Seminar in Music (2) 

692 Research Seminar in Music (1) 

Symbol: VOI 

501-02 Individual Lessons at the Minor Level 

(1) An elective course for graduate students. 
511-14 Individual Lessons at the Major Level (1) 

Voice majors in the master of music in music educa- 
tion program. PREREQ; Completion of the under- 
graduate voice major requirements or by audition. 
541-43 Individual Lessons at the Advanced 
Level (3) Advanced vocal studies culminating in a 
fiill master's recital. PREREQ; Completion of the 
performance requirements for the bachelor of 
music in voice program or admission by audition. 

696 Recital (1) A shared (halO public recital for 
candidates in the master of music education pro- 
gram in lieu of a research report. Candidate must 
write approved program notes. PREREQ; 
Approval by the examination committee. 

697 Recital (2) A fiiU public recital demonstrating 
an understanding of various performance styles 
and the ability to perform. Required of candidates 
for the master of music in voice degree. PRE- 
REQ; Approval by the examination committee. 

Symbol: VOW 

521 The Broadway Musical (3) Surveys the 
American musical theatre, past and present. Elements 
of producing the American musical in school settings. 

522 The Musical Revue (1-3) Explores the con- 
cept of choral music in motion and the necessary 
techniques and skills for mounting a successful 
choral ensemble. 



Music Education 

Prof. Albert, Chairperson 

PROFESSOR 

J. Br\'an Burton, D.M.E., University of Southern Mississippi 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Colleen T. Ludeker, Ed.D., West Virginia University; Dalcroze 
License, Manhattan School of Music 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Kristen Albert, M.Ed., Shippensburg University 



Ann McFarland, M.M., Temple University; Orff Certification, 
Cincinnati Conservatory 

MASTER OF MUSIC IN MUSIC EDUCATION 

(34 semester hours) 

Required 

Students may choose programs with performance, research, Kodaly, or 
Orff-Schulwerk options. All programs require completion of nine cred- 
its in three core courses: MUE S(X), 503, and 510. All students in M.M. 



Music: Music Education 



programs in music educarion also must complete a comprehensive exit 
examination. Students not holding Level I Certification in music edu- 
cation must complete prerequisite undergraduate work prior to admis- 
sion into a graduate program which requires Level 1 Certification. 

Additional Course Requirements 
Performance and Research Programs 

Performance: Six credits in music education; three credits in applied 
music; three credits in music theor)'; three credits in music history; 
three credits in fi'ee electives; three credits in concentration electives; 
recital (MUE 698 and VOI/AIM/PIA 696). Candidates desiring to 
pursue the recital option in voice must audition before the voice jury 
and receive permission to pursue that option before earning 15 grad- 
uate hours or after completing VOI 543, whichever comes first. 
Research Report: Six credits in music education; three credits in 
applied music; three credits in music theor}'; three credits in music 
histor}-; three credits in free electives; three credits in concentration 
electives; four credits in research (MUE 691 and 692). 
Kodaly Concentration: 18 credits in Kodaly (MUE 560-568); four 
credits in directed electives; and three credits in music history. 
Orflf-Schulwerk Concentration: 15 credits in Orff-Schulwerk 
(MUE 570-581); three credits of music history; and seven credits of 
free electives. 

Technology Concentration: six credits in required music technolo- 
gy courses; four credits in directed electives chosen from music 
technology courses; three credits in music history; three credits in 
music theory; three credits in applied music; three credits of free 
electives; and four credits in research. 



Certificate in Orff-Schulwerk 



15 semester hours 



Certificate in Kodaly Methodology 18 semester hours 

These programs arc designed for the in-service music educators 
who wish to upgrade their skills in classroom and choral instruction 
using the materials, musicianship skills, and methodologies in a 



focused program based on the teaching approaches developed by 
Carl Ortf and Zoltan Kodaly, yet who do not wish to undertake a 
full master's degree curriculum. The Department of Music 
Education has identified the following cohorts of potential students 
who may seek to enroll in such a certificate program: music educa- 
tors recently entering the teaching field who do not wish to enter a 
master's program; music educators already holding a master's degree 
in another field of music education and seeking specialized instruc- 
tion in the Orff-Schulwerk process or Kodaly methodology; music 
educators accepting a new teaching position requiring specialized 
training in this field; music educators who are being reassigned to a 
new position within their schools and are required to retrain to 
meet qualifications of the new job description. Three core levels of 
musicianship training and methodology meet the basic skill and 
knowledge requirements for the certificate, while three advanced 
materials and skills courses serve to pull together all levels of Orflf- 
Schulwerk instruction and prepare music educators to create curric- 
ular applications appropriate to their teaching assignment. 
The OrffSchulwerk certificate program is designed to be com- 
pleted in three consecutive summers of study: 

First summer: MUE 570, 571, and 572 

Second summer: MUE 573, 574, and 575 

Third summer: MUE 576, 577, and 578 
MUE 579, 580, and 581 may be taken in either the second or third 
summer of study (after students have successfiilly completed MUE 
571, 572, and 573). 

The Kodaly methodology certificate program is designed to be 
completed in three consecutive summers of study: 

First summer: MUE 560 and 561 

Second summer: MUE 562 and 563 

Third summer: MUE 564 and 565 
MUE 566, 567, and 568 may be taken in either the second or third 
summer of study (after students have successfiilly completed MUE 
560 and 561). 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MUSIC EDUCATION 

Symbol: MUE (unless otherwise shown) 

500 Methods and Materials of Research (3) Basic 
techniques and procedures. Major types of research. 
Methods for locating, evaluating, and interpreting 
evidence. Preparation of a research outline. 
503 Philosophical Foundations of Music 
Educarion (3) Historical and philosophical foun- 
dations of music education. Application of princi- 
ples of education to music. Major emphasis on 
development of a philosophy of the discipline. 

510 Current Trends in Music Educarion (3) 
Present practices and emerging developments in 
music education. 

511 Vitalizing Music in the Elementary School 
(3) Exploration and examination ot current peda- 
gogy, materials, and technolog)' available to 
enhance learning through music in the elementar)' 
classroom. Elementary education majors only. 

512 Teaching Music Listening Skills and 
Acrivitics (3) Analysis of musical concepts within 
selected compositions with subsequent design of 
sequential teaching-learning strategies for all lev- 
els, K-12. Music majors only. 

513 Music in the Middle School (3) Review and 
critical analysis ol music education in the middle 
school; philosophies, curriculum, practices, and 
personnel. 

515 Computer Applicarions in Music Educarion 
(3) Study ot recent technological advances and their 



applications to include computer-assisted software, 
music performance and printing, synthesizers, 
sequencers, MIDI communication standard, strate- 
gics and technologies for classroom, interactive video, 
artificial intelligence, expert systems, and HyperCard. 

516 Administrarion and Supervision of School 
Music (3) Administrative problems, curricular con- 
tent and scheduling, in-service training ot teachers, 
and specialized supervisory techniques for the 
music curriculum. PRERF.Q; Teaching experience. 

517 Psychology of Music (3) In-depth study of 
learning theories as related to music education and 
the nature of music. 

518 Mulricultural Pcrspecrives in Music Educa- 
rion (3) LIndcrstanding the diversity ol musical 
expressions of our planet and the multicultural musi- 
cal dynamics of American culture; pro\'ides music 
educator, with the information, materials, and teach- 
ing strategies required for the creation and mainte- 
nance of a multicoilturally based music curriailum. 

528 Music in Special Educarion (3) Character- 
istics of special pupils; adaptarion of teaching 
techniques; materials curriculum. 

529 Dalcroze Eurhythmies (3) A pedagogical 
approach to the study of enacting musical mean- 
ings in physical space. Refining the sensing, ana- 
lyzing, and improvising of musical concepts by 
understanding how music is produced. 
536-539 Workshops (1-3) Participation-oriented 
workshops designed to meet specific needs in 
music and music education and to develop skills 
for practical application in school and professional 



settings. (The prefixes that apply orJy to these 
workshops are MWE, music education; and 
MWH, handbells.) 

550 Related Arts Pedagogy in Music Educarion 
(3) Historical background ot the related-arts 
movement. Principles of related-arts teaching 
related to musical elements, forms, and styles, with 
appropriate teaching techniques at specified grade 
levels. Materials for school music programs: basal 
music series, other texts and literature, and 
resources in related arts. Demonstration lessons 
and unit planning. 

^551 Instrumental Music Educarion: Literature 
and Materials (3) Survey and analysis of newly 
published literature tor large and small performing 
ensembles, teaching texts, airrent pedagogical 
trends. Development of teaching strategies. Guest 
lecturers to include composers, conductors, and 
educators. May be repeated for credit with permis- 
sion of Department of Music Education. 
♦ 552 Teaching Ethnic Music (3) Study and 
analysis of cultural background, musical materials, 
and performance techniques of music from target 
cultures. Development ot teaching strategies appro- 
priate for public school classrooms. Target cultures 
will vary. Course may be repeated for credit with 
permission of Department of Music Education. 
560 Kodaly Level I: Musicianship Training (2) 
Designed to develop musicianship for teaching the 
Kodaly process in primary grades and to develop 



♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Music: Music History and Literature 



snidcnis aliility M scnj; pcntatonic literature and 
basic rhythms at sight in a classroom setting. 

561 KodiUy Level I: Methodology (2) Designed 
to present Icsson-plaiining strategies tor teaching 
Kodalv-hascii mcthodtiltigv in the primary grades. 

562 Kodaly Level II: Musicianship Training (2) 
Designed to develop musicianship tor teaching the 
Kodaly process in intermediate grades and the stu- 
dent's ability to sing diatonic literature and 
advanced rh\thms at sight in a classroom setting. 
PRERF.Q:MUE560and561. 

563 Kodaly Level II: Methodology (2) Designed 
to present lesson-planning strategies tor teaching 
Kodalv-bascd methodology in the intermediate 
grades'. PREREQ: MUE 560 and 561. 

564 Kodaly Level III: Musicianship Training (2) 
Designed to develop musicianship skills tor teach- 
ing the Kodaly process in secondary grades through 
classical music. PREREQiMUE 562 and 563. 

565 Kodaly Level III: Methodology (2) 
Strategics and materials for listening lessons will 
be presented as well as teaching techniques for 
secondary classrooms. Students are expected to 
submit a 30-35 minute teaching tape for purposes 
of coordinating all Kodaly teaching skills. PRE- 
REQ: MUE 562 and 563. 

566 Kodaly: Conducting (2) Designed to acquaint 
the student with the application and development 
of children's choral literature in performance using 
composed works of Kodaly and various other 
composers who have written for children. 

567 Kodaly: Folk Music (2) Designed to review 
and identify' folk song genre, identify principal 
researchers and collections, analyze materials col- 
lected, and submit project containing all materials. 

568 Kodaly: Games and Materials (2) Designed to 
provide participants with materials for preparing, 
presenting, and reinforcing rhythmic and melodic 
concepts through game playing and dances. 

570 Orff-Schulwerk Level I: Basic Musicanship 
(2) Designed to develop fundamental Orff 
processes through the acquisition of basic musical 
skills through pentatonic actiWties. 

571 Orff-Schulwerk Level I: Recorder (1) 
Designed to develop fundamental Orff processes 
through elemental proficiency on the soprano 
recorder 

572 Orff-Schulwerk Level I: Movement (1) 

Designed to develop fundamental Orff processes 
through movement - locomotor, dance, descrip- 
tive, free improvisation. 

573 Orff-Schulwerk Level II: Basic 
Musicianship (2) Designed to develop theoretical 
comprehension of the evolution of elemental 
music through the Baroque period. Liturgical and 
diatonic modes are used as vehicles in developing 
harmonic concepts. PREREQ^ MUE 570, 571, 



572, or Level 1 Certification troni AOSA accredit- 
ed program. Admission to program by audition. 

574 Orff-Schulwerk Level II: Recorder (1) 
Designed to develop skills on alto, tenor, and bass 
recorders through improvisation, accompaniment, 
and ensemble playing in various st\'les and histori- 
cal periods. PREREQ: MUE 570,'571, 572. 

575 Orff-Schulwerk Level II: Movement (1) 
Continued development of movement techniques 
through improvisation, choreography in set or free 
focus with either rhythm, music, or dramatic con- 
tent, or a combination thereof PREREQi MUE 
570,571,572. 

576 Orff-Schulwerk Level III: Basic Musician- 
ship (2) Designed to develop comprehension of 
20th-centur)' styles, theoretical and performance 
practices of Western and non -Western music, 
while using both ethnic and popular means. PRE- 
REQ: MUE 573, 574, 575, 

577 Orff-Schulwerk Level III: Recorder (1) 
Continuation ot Level II proficiencies and explo- 
ration of consort materials found in Orff- 
Schulwerk, Volumes 1-5. PREREQi573, 574, 575. 

578 Orff-Schulwerk Level III: Movement (1) 
Continuation ot Level 11 proficiencies; the analysis 
of ethnic and historical dances vyith appropriate 
choreographic notation in set and free form focus 
or a combination thereof PREREQIMUE 573, 

574, 575. 

579 Orff-Schulwerk: Recorder Ensemble (1) A 
culmination of recorder instruction, through per- 
formance analysis, and discussion into a sur\'ey of 
repertoire suitable for recorder consort and consort 
with subordinate instruments. PREREQ^ MUE 

573, 574, 575. 

580 Orff-Schulwerk: Movement (1) An in-depth 
study to develop visual and spatial awareness, 
coordination and body control, imagination, 
improvisation, and kinesthetic understanding of 
musical elements as they interact within the 
Schulwerk process. PREREQIMUE 573, 574, 

575. Open, as an elective, to students demonstrat- 
ing proficiency in creative movement, improvisa- 
tion, and ethnic dance. Admission by audition. 

581 Orff-Schulwerk; Instrumentation Practicum 
(1) A sun'ey of works by Carl Ortf and Gunild 
Keetman for the instrumentarium which requires 
advanced performance skills. PREREQ^ MUE 573, 

574, 575. Open, as an elective, to students demon- 
strating pla)'ing proficiencies using basic techniques 
or unpitched and pitched instruments, as well as 
improvisational skills. Admission by audition. 

590 Introduction to Music Technology (1) This 
course provides an introduction to music technol- 
og)'. Topics include a survey of musical applica- 
tions and the basics of computer operation. 

591 Introduction to Notation, Sequencing, and 
Electronic Instruments (2) This course covers 



music notation software, sequencing software, and 
electronic instruments in the elementary and sec- 
ondary music classrf>om. 

592 Introduction to Computer- Assisted 
Instruction, Multimedia, and the Internet (2) 
This course covers computer-assisted instruction, 
multimedia, and the Internet in the elementary 
and secondar)' music classroom. 

593 Notation for Music Education (2) This course 
covers notation software in the music classroom and 
as a tool for arranging and composing choral and 
instrumental music. PREREQIMUE 591, 592. 

594 Sequencing for Music Education (2) This 
course covers sequencing software in the music 
classroom and as a tool for creating original record- 
ings and multimedia files for the Internet and mul- 
timedia projects. PREREQixMUE 591, 592. 

595 Interactive Internet for Music Education (2) 
This course covers editing and integrating existing 
interactive Internet technology into the music 
classroom. There will be an emphasis on cus- 
tomizing on-line quizzes, and the development of 
custom, interativc music lessons. PREREQ; MUE 
591,592. 

596 Multimedia Authoring for Music Education 

(2) This course covers using, creating, and editing 
multimedia lessons for the music classroom. There 
will be an emphasis on customizing multimedia 
templates, and the development of custom, inter- 
active music lessons. PREREQ: MUE 591, 592. 

597 Digital Media for Music Education (2) This 
course covers creating and editing digital multime- 
dia for the music classroom with an emphasis on 
text, graphics, sound, and video. Digital media will 
be integrated into presentation programs and 
stand-alone formats such as audio and video tape, 
and CD. PREREQ: MUE 591, 592. 

598 Integrating Music Technology Into the 
Classroom (2) This course will cover effective 
teaching strategics using music technology. Topics 
will include computer-assisted instruction, multi- 
media, Internet, notation soft\vare, sequencing 
software, and electronic instruments. PREREQ; 
MUE 591, 592. 

679 Special Subjects Seminar (1-3) Significant 
topics presented by faculty members or visiting 
lecturers. Designed to meet specific needs of the 
seminar group. 

681-83 Independent Study in Music (1-3) 

Individual research under the guidance of a faculty 
member. PREREQ; Permission of instructor. 

691 Research Seminar in Music (2) A research 
proposal with supporting procedures is developed. 
Guidance in individual research topics, with tutori- 
al assistance in form and style of research writing. 

692 Research Report (2) 
698 Recital Research (1) 



Music History and Literature 

Dr. Murray, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS 

Scott L. Balthazar, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Sterling E. Murray, Ph.D., University of Michigan 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Julian Onderdonk, Ph.D., New York University 
Thomas Winters, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 



Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to degree pro- 
grams in music, music history applicants must demonstrate a reading 
knowledge of a foreign language, preferably French or German. 
Students found lacking in a reading skill in a foreign language must 
eliminate this deficiency before admission to degree candidacy. 



Music: Music Theory/Composition 



MASTER OF ARTS IN MUSIC HISTORY 

(30 semester hours) 

Thesis Option 

I. Area of Concentration 15 semester hours 
Five courses in music history, including one from Group I and one 
from Group II: 

Group I 

MHL 601, 602 
Group II 

MHL 603, 604 

II. Free Elecrives 

UL Research Component 
MHL 689, MHL 699 
IV. Exit Oral Examination (including thesis defense) 



Nonthesis Option 

I. Concentration Electives 15 semester hours 
Six courses in music history, including one from each of the fol- 
lowing groups: 

Group I 

MHL 601, 602 
Group 11 

MHL 603, 604 

II. Free Electives 
QL Elxit Examination 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

MUSIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE 

Symbol: MHL 

501 Style, Form, and Genre in Music History 

(3) /Vn introduction to the study of music at the 
graduate level designed as a survey of Western art 
music with emphasis on fundamental considera- 
tions of form, st\'lc, and genre. 
510 CoUcgiuiti Musicum (1) A chamber ensem- 
ble specializing in the use of authentic instruments 
and performance techniques in the music of the 
Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque eras. Open by 
audition. 

550 Seminar in Musicology (3) Bibliographical 
materials, introduction to musicological research, 
development of research techniques, and writing 
skills. Required of M.A. (music history) candidates. 
601 Topics in Medieval and Renaissance Music (3) 
Lxploration ot selected topics in medieval and ren- 
aissance music. Specific topics deal with various 
aspects of music and musical development during 
this historical epoch. The specific topic will vary witli 
each offering of the course. Taught as a seminar with 
emphasis on student participation and research. 
602Topic8 in 17th and Early 18th Century Music 
(3) Exploration of selected topics in the history of 
music in the 17th and early 18th centuries. Specific 
topics deal with various aspects of music and musi- 
cal development during this historical epoch. The 
specific topics will vary with each offering of the 
course. Taught as a seminar with emphasis placed 
on student participation and research. 
603 Topics in I.ate 18th and Early 19th Century 
Music (3) Exploration of selected topics in the 
history of music in the late 18th and early I9th 
centuries. Specific topics will deal with various 
aspects of music and musical development during 
this historical epoch. The specific topics and their 
number will vary with each offering of the course. 
Taught as a seminar with emphasis placed on stu- 



dent participation and research. 
604 Topics in Music of the Late 19th Century to 
Present (3) Exploration of selected topics in histor)- 
from the late 19th century to the present. Specific 
topics deal with various aspects of music and musi- 
cal development during this historic epoch. The 
specific topics will vary with each offering of the 
course. Taught as a seminar with empahsis placed 
on student participation and research. 
620 World Music (3) An introduction to the study 
of tribal, folk, popular, and oriental music and eth- 
nomusicological methodology. Open to music 
majors and nonmusic majors without prerequisites. 
622 History of Jazz (3) A survey of the history of 
jazz, including representative performers and their 
music. 

640 Medieval Music (3) Development of plain- 
song and secular monody, and beginnings and 
early history of polyphony to the 14th century. 
Consideration of contemporary trends in the visu- 
al arts, history, and literature. 

641 Renaissance Music (3) Sacred and secular 
music in the Age of Dufay; changing forms and 
styles through the music of the Franco-Flemish 
groups; the frottola and related forms; and 
Palestrina and his contemporaries. Brief consider- 
ation of contemporary trends in the visual arts, 
history, and literamre. 

642 Baroque Music (3) Styles and forms of the 
European repertoire; contributions of the major 
composers; and the role of music and musicians in 
the society of the period. 

643 Late I8th-Century Music (3) Changing styles 
and forms in the sons of J.S. Bach; the Viennese pre- 
cla.ssicists; the Mannheim School; opera; Joseph and 
Michael Haydn, Mozart, and their contemporaries. 

644 19th-century Music (3) Historical develop- 
ments during the Romantic period (ca. 1800- 
1900). Analysis of changes and trends, and com- 
parative aspects of new forms. 



645 20th-century Music (3) Chronological sur- 
vey of 20th-century music. Development of styles. 
Technical aspects of changes occurring in melody, 
rhythm, orchestration, texture, tonalit)', and form. 

654 History of Opera (3) The composers and their 
major contributions to the various schools ot opera. 

655 History of Orchestral Music (3) How the 
sj'mphony orchestra developed troni the Baroque 
period to the present in its fiinction, literature, 
instrumentation, and performance practices. 

658 Performance Practices (3) A consideration of 
the special problems encountered in the st>'Iistic 
realization and performance of music from the 
Medieval through the Romantic eras. Particular 
attention will be focused on original sources, peri- 
od instruments, and performance problems. 

659 Topics in American Music (3) Exploration of 
selected topics in the histor)' of music in America 
from 1620 to the present. 

662 Mozart and His Works (3) A study of the 
life and music of Wolfgang A. Mozart with special 
reference to the period in which he lived. Taught 
in summers in Salzburg, Austria. 

679 Topics in Music History I (1-3) Significant 
topics presented by facult)' members or visiting 
lecturers. Designed to meet specific needs of the 
seminar group. 

680 Topics in Music History II (1-3) Significant 
topics presented by faculty members or visiting 
lecturers. Designed to meet specific needs of the 
seminar group. 

681-83 Independent Study in Music History (1- 
3) Individual research under the guidance of a fac- 
ulty- member. 

698 Directed Research in Musicology (3) This 
course is designed to assist the graduate music his- 
tory major to focus research pursuits toward for- 
mulation of a potentially successfiil thesis topic. 

699 Thesis in Music History (3) 



Music Theory/Composition 

Dr. Maggio, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS 

Robert Maggio, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Larry A. Nelson, Ph.D., Michigan State University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Mark T. Rimple, D.M.A., Temple University 



ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Alexander Rozin, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to the general requirements for admission to degree pro- 
grams in music, theory/composition applicants must (1) schedule an 
interview with a faculty committee appointed by the chairperson of 
the Department of Music Theory/Composition; and (2) demonstrate 



NiirMiii:; 



sufficient pianistif ability, sight singing, and aur.il perception to meet 
the demands of the program. In addition, composition applicants 
must submit original works showing technical facility in composition. 

MASTER OF MUSIC IN THEORY/COMPOSITION 

(.30 semester hours) 

I. Requirements 3 semester hours 
Music I listory (3) 

II. Area of Concentration 21 semester hours 
A. Requirements 15 semester hours 

MTC 512, 517, 542, 544, 579 



Note; On the basis of student preparation, and under advise- 
ment, a course from concentration electives may be substituted. 
B. Concentration Electives 6 semester hours 

Any two selected from the following: 
MTC 513, 514, 516, 541, 545, 546, 552, 554 
DL Free Elective 3 semester hours 

IV. Research Component 3 semester hours 
MTC 697 or 699 

V. Comprehensive Examination (Thesis Defense) 

The thesis defense serves as the comprehensive exit examination. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
MUSIC THEORY/COMPOSITION 

Symbol: M TC (unless otherwise indicated) 

512-14 Advanced Composition I, II, and III (.3) 
Free composition in larger forms for ensembles, 
solo voice and chorus, chamber groups, and 
orchestra. PRERl'.QiMTC 213 (Theory of Music 
IV') or equivalent. 

517 Electronic Music (3) Materials and techniques 
of electronic music and their use in composition. 
Laboratory experience in the composition of elec- 
tronic music. PRF-RKCi Permission of the instructor. 
MW) 536-39 Jazz Studies Workshop (1-3) A 
workshop for the stud)' and performance of jazz. 
Arranging and ensemble performance opportunities. 
A sep;u'atc brt)churc describes summer workshops. 

541 Advanced Orchestration (3) Original com- 
position or arrangement for orchestra. PRERECi 
A knowledge of the instruments of the orchestra 
and experience in their use. 

542 Advanced Musical Form (3) A detailed study 
of music;d form, with emphasis on modifications 
of sonata form, vocal and instrumental forms of 
Baroque music, and forms that axe unique. 

544 Advanced Counterpoint I (3) Contrapuntal 
techniques of the 18th century. Chorale prelude 
and invention. 



545 Advanced Counterpoint II (3) Continuation 

of MTC 544. Includes the canon, invcrtible coun- 
terpoint, and fiigue. PREREQ^ MTC 544 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

546 Techniques of Early 20th-century Music 
(3) A study of compositional techniques in repre- 
sentative vocal and instnimental works of the first 
two decades of this century. 

550 Acoustics of Music (3) The study of sound: 
its production, transmission, and reception. Mu- 
sical instruments, the acoustics of rooms, and the 
physical basis of scales. 

561 Jazz Harmony and .Arranging (3) 

562 AdvancedJazzHarmony andi^\rranging(3)A 
study of improvisation and arranging, literature, and 
other aspects of an important phase ot popular styles. 
564 Performance Practices in Contemporary 
Music (3) This course will provide the following 
opportunities: (1) the participants will study tech- 
nical problems of understanding new notation 
(e.g., graphic scores, proportional scores, multi- 
phonics, microtones, metric modulation, asymmet- 
rical rhythm groupings, prose scores, etc.), and will 
develop a reasonable facility in performing scores 
that include these techniques; (2) an ensemble, for 
which composition students may compose; and (3) 
the establishment of an ensemble, which may pub- 
licly perform new music. 



579 Seminar in Music Theory (1-3) Special top- 
ics seminar designed to meet specific needs of 
music majors in the area of theory research. 

591 Advanced Chromatic Harmony (3) 

592 Advanced Ear Training (2) 

679 Special Subjects Seminar (1-3) Significant 
topics presented by faculty members or visiting 
lecturers. Designed to meet specific needs of the 
seminar group. 

681-83 Independent Study in Music (1-3) In- 
dividual research under the guidance of a faculty 
member. PREREQ; Permission of instructor. 
691-92 Research Seminar in Music (1-2) A 
research proposal with supporting procedures is 
developed. Guidance in individual research topics 
with tutorial assistance in form and style of 
research writing. 

697 Theory Thesis (3) For graduate majors in 
theory only. 

698 Research Report (1) 

699 Musical Composition Thesis (3) For gradu- 
ate majors in composition only. 



Nursing 

222 Sturzebecker Health Sciences Center 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2219 

Dr Coghlan Stowe, Chairperson 

Dr. ^h\c\!.t)\ Assistant Chairperson 

Dr. Hickman, Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSOR 

Janet S. Hickman, Ed.D., Temple University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Charlotte Mackev, Ed.D., Widawr University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Ann Coghlan Stowe, M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 
Brent W. Thompson, D.N.Sc, Widener University 

INSTRUCTOR 

Cher)'l Schlamb, M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania 



MASTER OF SCIENCE IN NURSING 

Mission 

The mission of the Department of Nursing at West Chester 
University is to provide high-quality professional degree education 
in nursing. The baccalaureate program prepares graduates for entry 
to nursing practice, and the master's program prepares graduates for 
advanced practice in community health nursing. The goal of the 
department is to prepare nurses for leadership and advocacy in the 
health promotion, disease prevention, and health restoration of indi- 
viduals, families, and communities. Graduates of these nursing pro- 
grams will be professionals capable of assuming leadership in pres- 
ent and emerging health care roles, citizens who contribute to socie- 
ty and are committed to life-long learning and personal develop- 
ment. 

At the end of the M.S.N, program, the graduate will be able to: 
1. synthesize philosophy, theory, content, and methods of public 

health science and nursing science as a basis for community 

health nursing practice; 



Nursing 



2. demonstrate advanced clinical skills in societ)' including cultural- 
ly diverse and/or medically underserved individuals and aggre- 
gates; 

3. assume beginning roles in education or administration; 

4. design health care strategies in which nurses contribute to the 
hciilth promotion and disease prevention of individuals and 
aggregates; 

5. evaluate health care issues, trends, and policies; 

6. pursue and evaluate professional development as a continuing 
professional learner; 

7. collaborate with interdisciplinary groups in the community for 
the purpose of health care planning to achieve the objectives of 
Healthy People 2010; 

8. acquire a foundation for doctoral study in nursing; 

9. assume the role of advocate in community settings to promote 
accessibility of health care services and to enhance quality of care; 

10. demonstrate a philosophy of nursing that reflects commitment to 
social justice and the advancement of nursing science; 

11. participate in scientific inquiry directed to the health care needs 
of populations as well as individuals and families. 

M.S.N. Admission Requirements 

The minimum admission standards for the Department of Nursing 
are a B.S.N, degree from a National League for Nursing 
Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) or a Commission on 
Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) accredited program, an 
undergraduate GPA of at least 2.8, a course in statistics, a course in 
physical assessment, current licensure as a registered nurse 
(Pennsylvania licensure required prior to the clinical practicum), at 
least two years of recent full-time experience as a nurse providing 
direct clinical care, and three letters of recommendation from indi- 
viduals familiar with the applicant's academic and/or professional 
qualifications. 

School Nurse Certification 

The School Nurse Certification program is a 13-credit, post-bac- 
calaureate program that prepares students for initial Pennsylvania 
Department of Education certification as an Educational Specialist 
I - School Nurse. Required courses are NSG 502, 512, 520, and 
EDA 541. 

Program Objectives 

1. Demonstrates competency in providing alternatives for planning, 
implementing, and evaluating health interventions and wellness 
promotion in a variety of school settings. 

2. Analyzes the organization, administration, and governance of the 
educational system. 

3. Articulates an understanding of child/adolescent growth and 
development. 

4. Demonstrates competency in planning and implementing learn- 
ing experiences that meet the needs of students from varying 
cultural backgrounds. 

5. Displays proficiency in selecting, implementing, and evaluating 
an appropriate health maintenance and wellness program for stu- 
dents and families. 

6. Identifies legal aspects of the educational system as they relate to 
the role of the school nurse. 

Admissions Requirements for School Nui^e Certification 

1. B.S.N, degree from a National League tor Nursing Accrediting 
Commission (NLNAC) or a Commission on Collegiate Nursing 
Education (CCNE) accredited nursing program. 

2. Current licensure as a registered nurse in Pennsylvania. 



3. A cumulative undergraduate grdJc [i.-iii; .iierage ot 3.0. 

Certificate in Parish Nursing (18 semester hours) 

Parish nursing is a modality for ctxjrdinating the meeting of health 
needs of individuals and families within the context of their spiritual 
community. It is a nondenominational nursing approach (not a pastoral 
approach) which can be used in any religious tradition. 

TTie certificate program courses are as follows: 

NSG 50r, 502*, 504', 518, 519*; and HEA 501 
Electives: 

HEA 511, 512, 545, 581; and NSG 516 

M.S.N. (Emphasis in Community Health Nursing) 

The master of science in nursing program will prepare professional 
nurses for leadership roles in community health nursing through in- 
depth consideration of community-based health care delivery sys- 
tems, preparation in a fianctional role, and the use of critical inquiry 
and scholarship to improve the practice of nursing. 
The program curriculum, developed in coordination with nurse educa- 
tors, clinicians, and professional societies, offers a choice ot instrucrional 
focus. The student will select education, administration, or integra- 
tive health as a fijnctional component within the communit)' hcidth 
program of study. All students pursuing the M.S.N, degree are required 
to earn six credits in nursing research to complete the program. 

Functional Component: Nursing Education 

The focus in nursing education will enhance the skills of the profes- 
sional nurse in curriculum development and teaching competencies in 
nursing. Relevant electives (three credits) are selected under advisement. 

Functional Component: Nursing Administration 

The nursing administration focus will facilitate preparation of gradu- 
ate nurses as clinical specialists, especially in the fields of gerontology 
and chronic illness. This focus is designed in view of a more severely 
Ul case mL\ in acute-care settings, as well as accelerated use of 
HMO's, home health agencies, and other types of community-based 
care. Relevant electives (three credits) are selected under advisement. 

Functional Component: Integrative Health 

The integrative health focus provides both content and field experi- 
ence in alternative and complementary health modalities. Relevant 
electives (three credits) are selected under advisement. 

Curriculum 39 semester hours 

I. Core Component 18 semester hours 
HEA 520; NSG 501, 502, 503, 504 

II. Functional Component 9 semester hours 
Each student will choose nursing administration, nursing educa- 
tion, or integrative health as a fiinctional focus. 

A. Nursing Administration 

NSG 509, 510, and relevant electives selected under advise- 
ment (3) 
OR 

B. Nursing Education 

NSG 507, 508, and relevant electives selected under advise- 
ment (3) 

C. Integrative Health 

HEA 501 or NSG 518, NSG 515, and relevant electives 
selected under advisement (3) 

III. Research Component 6 semester hours 
NSG 505, 506 

IV. Thesis and Nonthesis Option 6 semester hours 

Thesis: NSG 610 (3-6) OR 
Nonthesis: Relevant electives selected under advisement (6) 

V. Satisfactory performance on the written and/or oral comprehen- 
sive examination 



Nursing 



Special Requirements 

Insurance. Students arc required to carry liability insurance cover- 
age in the amount of $l,000,000/$3,00d,000 when enrolled in nurs- 
ing courses having a clinical component. 

CPR Ccrtificarion. Saidents enrolled in nursing courses having a clini- 
cal component are required to be currently certified by the Ainerican 
Red Cross, American llciut Association, or other acceptable resource 
in life support (two-person) cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The CPR 
course must include resuscitation of infants and children. 



In addition, school nurse certification candidates must have Acts 
151 and .34 clearance prior to the school health practicum. 

Health Requirements 

Students enrolled in nursing courses having a clinical component must 
provide the Department of Nursing with evidence of a current (within 
one year) health assessment performed by a physician or certified nurse 
practitioner. Documentation of inoculations against diphtheria, tetanus, 
measles, poliomyelitis, Rubella, and hepatitis B must be included. 



COURSE DKSCRIPTIONS 
NURSING 

Symbol: NSG 

501 Nursing Theories and Issues (3) K.vploration 
ot a viuicty of theories and current issues that affect 
nursing practice, education, and administration. 

502 Perspectives of Community Health Nursing 
(4) Introduction to concepts ot public health and 
communit)' health nursing. Includes both class- 
room presentations and clinical practicum in an 
agency of interest to the student, focusing primari- 
ly on communin' he;ilth care. PRERF^Q_or CON- 
CURR:NSG 501. 

503 Principles and Practice of Community 
Health Nursing (5) Suidcnts will continue to 
refine the application ot principles ot community 
health during a second in the series ot courses 
combining theory with practice. Continued 
emphasis on the political, governmental, and fiscal 
management aspects ot communirv health nurs- 
ing. PREREQ: NSG 502. 

504 Advanced Concepts of Community Health 
Nursing (2) Seminar on advanced concepts of 
community health. No clinical practicum is associ- 
ated with this course, which will be taken either 
prior to or together v«th the functional practicum. 
I'REREQ: NSG 503. 

505 Nursing Research I (3) 

506 Nursing Research II (3) Critical analysis of 
research design and outcomes, using existing nursing 
research studies trom the protession;il literature and 
existing computerized simulated re.search to develop 
skill in resciu-ch modalities. PREREQ. NSG 505. 

507 Curriculum Development in Nursing 
Education (3) This course is designed to examine 
the theor)' and practice of curriculum development 
as a group process, synthesizing basic principles of 
curriculum in nursing education. 

508 Teaching Competencies in Nursing — 
Principles and Methods (3) Examination of the 
teaching-lciU'ning process and skills in professional 
nursing, with emphasis on baccalaureate or in-serv- 
ice education. Includes both classroom and clinicd 
practicum teaching experience, as well as seminars 
\vith other students enrolled. Focus is community 
health nursing throughout. PRERECi. NSG 507. 

509 Community Health Nursing Administra- 
tion (3) Principles ot administration, leadership, 
and organization related to the delivery of com- 
munit)' health nursing care. Organizational, man- 
agement, power, decision- making, motivational, 
and change theories will be examined in relation- 
ship to the community health nurse administrator 



510 Nursing Administration in Community 
Health Nursing Settings (3) Examination of 
management skills for nurse-administrators in a 
service setting in communit)' health. Includes both 
classroom and clinical practicum administrative 
experience, as well as seminars with other students 
enrolled. Focus is communiry- health nursing 
throughout. PREREQ: NSG 509. 

511 Measurement and Evaluation in Nursing 
Education (3) This course will focus on the appli- 
cation of principles of measurement and evaluation 
within nursing education. Practical experiences will 
include tlie construction and evaluation of class- 
room tests and clinical assessment instruments, as 
well as interpretation of standardized tests used 
within nursing education. Current trends and 
issues related to evaluation will be discussed. 

512 Legal Mandates of School Nursing (3) This 
course examines the structure ot the educational 
organization and legal issues that specifically affect 
the certified school nurse and impact the student 
in the learning environment. Emphasis will be 
placed on the school nurse's rcsponsibilit)' to 
enhance the student's abilit)' to learn in relation to 
promotion, restoration, and maintenance ot health. 

513 Nursing Informatics (3) This course will focus 
on the current and potential impact of the micro- 
computer in the nursing arenas of practice, educa- 
tion, and administration. Basic concepts of computer 
literac)' will be reviewed with lab exercises to assist 
those who are not computer literate. The course then 
will proceed from the histor)' of nursing informatics 
and culminate with the fiiture of nursing informatics. 

514 Human Lactation, Breast-Feeding, and 
Health of the Community (3) This three-credit 
course is for students seeking in-depth knowledge 
about breast-feeding and human lactation. 
Through various assignments, the research in lacta- 
tion will be explored and critiqued. Emphasis is on 
understanding the physiolog)' of human lactation 
and the health impact on infants and their moth- 
ers. The normal process of breast-feeding will be 
addressed with analysis of the barriers to breast- 
feeding in today's societ)'. Using national policies 
and standards as the focal point, the student will 
analyze what local, national, and international 
organizations are doing to support breast-feeding. 

515 Nursing Practice in Integrative Health 
Settings (3) .A.n advanced practice nursing course 
in communit)-based integrative health setting(s). 
Includes both classroom and clinicial practice as 
well as seminars with other students enrolled. 
Focus is on community health nursing throughout. 
One hour of class, eight hours of clinical per week. 
PREREQ: NSG 518 or HEA 501. 



516 Cancer Nursing Practice (3) The emphasis of 
this course is the care ot clients with cancer. This 
course examines the various physiological, psy- 
chosocial, and spiritual effects this disease has on 
clients and their families. A variety of topics will 
be discussed, including communication, hope, sex- 
uality, spiritualit)', loss, fain, and altered body 
image. The focus of the course is on the role of 
the professional nurse in prevention, diagnosis, 
and client management. 

517 Selected Topics in Nursing (1-6) An in- 
depth study of selected, current topics relevant to 
the development of nursing majors. This course 
will emphasize the critical analysis of current top- 
ics that impact on professional nursing. Each stu- 
dent will develop a commitment to reading and 
critiquing nursing research in professional journals 
as part of the teaching-learning process. 

518 Care of the Community Spirit (3) This course 
focuses on communit)' building and spirituality. 
Course content includes introduction to the concept 
of community spirit, culture, and community, inte- 
gration of health and spirit within the community. 

519 Parish Nursing (3) This course provides an 
overview of the practice of parsh nursing, within the 
broader focus of advanced practice nursing. It 
includes both the context of parish nursing practice 
and the collaborative aspects of parish nursing. 
Legal and ethical aspects of parish nursing practice 
are addressed. 

520 Health .-Assessment in Advanced Nursing 
Practice (3) This course combines comprehensive 
theoretical and laboraton' experience to enable the 
nurse in advanced practice to complete a holistic 
health assessment of the client. Opportunit)' is pro- 
vided to enhance the participant's ability to collect 
rele\'ant data \'ia use of appropriate inter\'iewing 
methods, developmental and physical assessment 
techniques, critical thinking, and psychomotor skills 
(t\vo hours, lecture; three hours, laboratory). 

521 Palliative Nursing Care in the Community (3) 
ProMsion of palliative care in various community 
settings. End-of-life issues addressed mth strategies 
to promote change. Biopsychosocial and spiritual 
s)'mptom management for individuals and families 
is emphasi7.ed. 

522 Epidemiology (3) An overview of the epidemi- 
ological model of disease causation. Various epi- 
demiological study designs and theu- applications 
will be presented. 

610 Thesis (3-6) Undertaken after completion of 
NSG 506. Research, supervised from topic selec- 
tion, implementation, evaluation, and presentation. 



Political Scieiui 



Philosophy 



103 Main HaU 

West Chester Universirv 

West Chester. PA 19383 

610-436-2841 

Dr. Piatt, Chairperson and Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

W. Stephen Croddy, Ph.D., Brown University 
Thomas W. Piatt, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Frederick R. Struckmeyer, Ph.D., Boston University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Frank Hoffman, Ph.D., University of London 
Ruth Porritt, Ph.D., Purdue University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Seetha Burtner, Vhl)., Purdue University 
Joan Woolfrey, Ph.D., University of Oregon 

Program of Study 

The Department of Philosophy offers a program leading to the 
master of arts in philosophy. This degree will serve as a foundation 
for studies leading to a Ph.D. in philosophy or prepare students for 
positions in industrj', government, or college teaching. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting general requirements for admission to a degree 
program at West Chester, applicants must present a minimum of 12 



semester hours of undergraduate philosophy, including courses in hjsto- 
n' of iuicient philosophy, histor)- of modem philosophy, ethics, and logic. 

Foreign Language Requirement 

Candidates for the M.A. must demonstrate a reading proficiency in 
French, German, Spanish, or another language approved by the 
department. 

Final Elxamination Requirement 

A comprehensive, written final examination is required of those stu- 
dents not electing the thesis option. This will cover four fields: (1) 
metaphysics; (2) any two from logic, ethics, aesthetics, philosophy of 
language, philosophy of science, or American philosophy, and (3) 
any agreed-upon philosopher, such as Plato, Aquinas, Kant, or 
Wittgenstein. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN PHILOSOPHY 

(30 semester hours) 

All candidates are required to take PHI 599 and PHI 640. Beyond 
these requirements, the student has the choice of a thesis or nonthe- 
sis program. 

The thesis program requires 18 semester hours in philosophy; six 
semester hours of electives, chosen from philosophy or related cours- 
es; and the thesis (PHI 610), which Recounts for six semester hours. 
The nonthesis program specifies 24 semester hours in the philosophy 
concentration and six semester hours of electives (philosophy or related). 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
PHILOSOPHY 

Symbol: PHI 

506 Meaning in Language (also LIN 506) (3) A 

discussion of topics having to do with meaning in 
everyday oral communication. 

512 Ethical Theories (3) Examination of various 
ethical theories with practical applications to such 
problems as authority, punishment, rights, mar- 
riage, and race. 

513 Aesthetic Theories (3) History of aesthetics, 
as seen in classic interpretations. Psychological and 
sociological origins of art; the role ot art works in 
the enrichment of Hfe. 

514 Philosophy of Religion (3) Dominant trends 
in religious philosophy ot the Western world. 
Religious language, reason and faith, science, the 
nature of man, the existence of God, and mysticism. 

515 Existentialism (3) Background and themes of 
current existentialism, as reflected in Kierkegaard, 
Jaspers, Marcel, Heidegger, and Sartre. Evaluation 
of existentialism and its impact on contemporary 



literature, drama, art, and society. 
520 Philosophy of Mind (3) The human mind, ac- 
cording to representative views. Presuppositions and 
implications, both scientific and philosophic, traced 
and analyzed. The mind-body problem, perception, 
memory, and the implications ot depth psychology. 

522 Philosophy ofSdence (3) The course begins 
with case studies in science and derives general prin- 
ciples from them. Scientific law, analogy, models, 
variant theories, confirmation, and interpretation. 

523 Philosophy of Language (also LIN 523) (3) 
Problems of language and oral communication, 
with emphasis on problems of reference. 

530 American Philosophy (3) American views of 
man, society, and the universe, from colonial times to 
the 20th century. 

♦ 531 Oriental Philosophy (3) Central figures and 
classic teachings of Eastern phUosophy and religion: 
Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confijcianism, Taoism, 
and Shintoism; naturalistic and humanistic elements 
of decisive influence on the culture ot the Orient. 
536 Symbolic Logic (3) Basic principles and 



methods of symbolic logic. Practice in determining 
validity of sentential and quantificational argu- 
ments. The algebra of classes. 
570 Biomedical Ethics (3) Philosophical analysis 
of ethical issues in medicine, research, and 
biotechnology. 

♦ 590 Independent Studies in Philosophy (3) 

♦ 599 Philosophic Concepts and Systems (3) 
Basic concepts ot the philosophic enterprise: form, 
matter, the categories, cause, and purpose. Relation 
of premises to method and conclusions. Rival theo- 
ries are compared for justification and adequacy. 
610 Thesis (3-6) 

♦ 640 Seminar (3) Study and evaluation of the 
major works of one philosopher, such as Plato, 
Aquinas, Kant, or Wittgenstein. 

The following undergraduate course may also be 
taken for graduate credit, when properly approved: 
PHI 470 Biomedical Ethics, PHI 480 Environ- 
menral Ethics, PHI 482 Social Philosophy. 

♦ This course may be taken again for credit. 



Political Science 

106 Ruby Jones Hall 
West Chester University 
West Chester, PA 19383 
610-436-2743 
Dr. Loedel, Chairperson 

Dr. Milne, Director, Master of Science in Administration; Public 
Administration Adviser 



PROFESSOR 

Robert J. Marbach, Ph.D., Temple University 

ASSOCL\TE PROFESSORS 

R. Lorraine Bernotsky, D.Phil., Oxford University 

Peter H. Loedel, Ph.D., University of California, Santa Barbara 

Yury Polsky, Ph.D., University of Michigan 

Bhim Sandhu, Ph.D., University of Missouri 



I'rof'fssional and Stcondarv Education 



Frauke Schncll, Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

John J. Kennedy, Ph.D., 'I'cmplt.' University 
Duane D. Milne, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Linda S. Stevenson, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Political Science offers the master of science in 
administration (M.S.A.) with a concentration in public administra- 
tion. This is an interdisciplinary degree and is described in the 
"Administration" section of this catalog. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ADMINISTRATION 
Concentration in Public Administration 



36 semester hours 
18 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Administrative Core 

ADM 501, 502, 503, 504, 505, and 507 

II. Public Administration Core' 18 semester hours 

Option 1 : Focus on state and local government 
ADM 500, 600; GEO 525, 527; PSC 544, 549 



OR 

Option 2: Specialized focus, taken under 

advisement, to meet the student's career 

goals and needs 

ADM 500, 600; PSC 544,* 549 

Electives (6) 
Additionally, both concentration options allow for an internship expe- 
rience (ADM 612 Internship) of 3-6 semester hours. Students with 
little or no organizational work experience are required to successfully 
complete ADM 612 as an additional 3-6 hours in the concentration. 
For course descriptions for ADM courses, see "Master of Science in 
Administration," page 30. For course descriptions for GEO courses, 
see "Geography and Planning," page 62. 

A comprehensive examination in the concentration is required. The 
examination is based on core and concentration course work. 



'Students with undergraduate majors in political science may be permitted, 
with approval of concentration adviser, to substitute appropriate courses. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Svmbol: PSC unless otherwise shown 

515 Women in Politics (3) Ihe role of women in 
politics is surveyed. Considerations include the 
relationship between the sexes as it has an impact 
on politics. 

525 The American Presidency (3) Analysis of the 
presidency, stressing its evolution into a modem 
institution and the contemporary behavioral asperts 
of the office. Personality, power, and campaign strate- 
gy in conjunction with presidential relations with the 
executive branch. Congress, courts, and the media. 

530 The Politics of the Holocaust and Genocide 
(3) This course examines the political causes of the 
Holocaust and genocides both in a historical and 
current context. Case studies include the Jews in 
Europe, /\rmenians, and Cambodians. 

531 Modern Political Theory (3) Critical analysis 
of enduring political problems as seen primarily in 
the writings of theorists from Machiavelli to the 
present; basic concepts of political science; theories 
concerning the proper role of the state in society. 

532 International Relations (3) Factors motivat- 
ing the actions ot nations; machinery evolved by 
nation states for effecting their various policies. 
Methods of diplomacy, international law, and 
international organization. 

533 Congressional Politics (3) The politics of, and 
the legislative process in, Congress. Internal influ- 
ences on the Congressional performance, such as 
rules, norms, and behavior, and external influences 
including the executive branch and interest groups. 



534 American Political Parties (3) Patterns, func- 
tions, and history ot the American political party 
system at national, state, and local levels. 
Theoretical and empirical studies of political inter- 
est groups, public opinion, and voting behavior. 

540 American Constitutional Law (3) Evolution 
of constitutional law through study ot the leading 
decisions of the Supreme Court and their signifi- 
cance tor the American governmental system. 

541 Latin American Culture and Politics (3) 
Comparative analysis ot contemporary Latin- 
American systems. Stress ot political culture, deci- 
sion making, ideologies, and political processes. 

542 Dynamicsof Public Opinion and Political 
Behavior (3) The political role and style of masses 
and elites; uses and abuses of polls, political social- 
ization, voting behavior, campaigning, and media. 
Understanding individual opinion formation 
(micro) and mass publics (macro). 

544 American Public Policy (3) Survey of litera- 
ture; examination of approaches; discussion of 
concepts and issues in the field of American poli- 
tics and policy processes. 

548 The Communist Powers (3) Comparative 
study of various Communist systems, particularly 
the U.S.S.R. and China. Elite-mass relationships; 
role of Marxism-Leninism; party, economic, and 
political structures. Secondary attention to Eastern 
Europe, Cuba, and nonruling parties. 

549 Politics of Bureaucracy and Administrative 
Behavior (3) In-depth examination of the fourth 
branch of government. Impact of administrative 
apparatus (bureaucracy) on public policy formula- 
tion and implementation in the United States. 



551 The Politics ofNon-Western Areas (3) 

Problems of nation building, political participa- 
tion, and elite-mass relationships in the less-devel- 
oped nations. Latin American, Asian, or African 
nations may be stressed as a case study. 

552 Civil Liberties and Civil Rights (3) Analysis 
of constitutional rights and governmental attitudes 
with respect to civil liberties. Emphasis on case- 
study method and role playing. 

560 The Politics of Revolution (3) Synthesis of 
research, concepts, and theories ot revolution. 
Stress on the meaning, causes, phases, and ideolo- 
gies of revolution. Contemporary movements 
emphasized. 

PAD 561 State and Local Government (3) 
Examination of the organization, functions, and 
politics of state and local government, including 
analysis of politics in states, counties, cities, and 
towns in urban, suburban, and rural areas. 
Intergovernmental relations in education, trans- 
portation, and welfare policy are examined. 
PAD 573 American Intergovernmental Relations 
(3) Designed to familiarize students with the com- 
plex network of conflict, cooperation, and interde- 
pendence among narional, state, and local govern- 
ment units. Topic areas include an analysis of con- 
tinuing evolution of American federalism, an exam- 
ination of this relationship from state and city gov- 
ernment perspectives, and a description of specific 
intergovernmental fiscal programs and policies. 
590 Independent Study in Political Science (1- 
3) Research projects, reports, and readings in 
political science. PREREQ^ Approval of depart- 
ment chairperson. 



Professional and Secondary Education 



201 Recitation Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2958 

Dr. Hsu, Chairperson 



Dr. Morgan, Assistant Chairperson and Coordinator of Graduate Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Yi-Ming Hsu, Ed.D., University of Georgia 

John L. Hynes, Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany 



Professional and Secondary Education 



Lesley A. Welsh, Ph.D., Lhuvc-rsity oj Connecticut 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Kjmberlce S. Brown, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

Marlcne K. Goss, Ph.D., Walden University 

Cynthia Haggard, Ed.D., Indiana University 

John Holingjak, Jr., M.Ed., Temple University 

John Kinslow, Ph.D., Temple University 

Thomas Mastrilli, Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

Paul .\.. Morgan, Ph.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

David L. Bolton, Ph.D., Florida State University 
Christian V. Penny, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

Programs of Study 

The Department of" Professional and Secondary Education offers 
graduate programs leading to teacher certification, as well as the 
master of education and master of science degrees. 

MASTER OF EDUCATION IN SECONDARY 
EDUCATION 

Dr. Morgan, Program Coordinator 

This program is designed primarily to strengthen the professional 
knowledge, skills, and understanding of the graduate student. 
Practicing teachers will increase their knowledge base of effective 
teaching. In addition to the education courses offered, the 15 
semester-hour elective area allows students to increase their knowl- 
edge in the academic content area. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting admission requirements of the University, 
the student must: 

1 . Be approved by the Department of Professional and Secondary 
Education for graduate work. 

2. Attain an acceptable score on the Graduate Record E.xamination 
or the Miller Analogies Test. It is strongly recommended that the 
applicant have a valid teaching certificate. Applicants whose cer- 
tification is not in secondary education may, at the department 
chairperson's discretion, be required to take course work beyond 
the minimum semester-hour requirements for the degree. 

Upon admission, students will be assigned advisers who will help 
them to outline the appropriate program. All work for the program 
must be approved by the program coordinator. 

Requirements for Admission to Degree Candidacy 

During the precandidacy period, the student must: 

1. Attain fiill status, if admission status to the program was provisional. 

2. Complete these required courses: EDF 500 and 510, and FIDP 550. 

3. Achieve a minimum overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 
and a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the required courses in the area 
of concentration. 

4. Show evidence of academic, personal, and professional qualities 
that satisfy the adviser and the departmental graduate committee. 

Curriculum 36 semester hours 

I. Required Courses 9 semester hours 
KOI' 500 and 510, ED? 550 

II. Area of Concentration Requirements 12 semester hours 
A minimum of 12 semester hours must be 

selected from the following: 
EDF 503, 504, 505, 506, 507, 509, 515, 516, 520, 
570, 580, 581, 589, 590; EDP 531; EDS 502, 505, 
524, 599; EDT 500, 501, 502, 503; EDU 501, 502 
m.EIectives 15 semester hours 

The electives may be from courses listed above, or from courses in 
the student's teaching field. They also may be a combination of both. 



Comprehensive Exanunation 

Students must perform satisfactorilv on a written comprehensive 

examination. 

To be eligible, students must have: 

1. Taken the required courses: EDF 500 and 510, and EDP 550. 

2. Completed 28 semester hours of work, including the nine 
semester hours of required courses and 12 semester hours from 
the area of concentration. 

3. Attained a minimum overall GPA of 3.0 and a minimum GPA 
of 3.0 in the required courses and the courses in the area of con- 
centration. 

4. Received the approval of the departmental graduate coordinator. 
Students who fail the comprehensive examination are allowed a sec- 
ond attempt. A second failure terminates candidacy. 

Secondary Teaching Certification 

The Department of Professional and Secondary' Education offers a 
nondegree program for post-baccalaureate students seeking second- 
ary teaching certification. Students must apply through the Office of 
Graduate Studies and Extended Education tor the certification pro- 
gram and meet admission requirements specified by the Pennsylvania 
DepkU-tment of Education for the University. (See "Formal 
Admission to Teacher Education for Certification," page 21.) The 
program consists of six education courses, including a methods 
course offered bv the academic area, plus a flill semester of student 
teaching. Students must have academic course work in their subject 
area discipline(s) equivalent to an undergraduate B.S.Ed, from West 
Chester University. Undergraduate transcripts will be evaluated by 
the content area department to assess any additional course work 
that may be needed in the academic discipline. Courses required for 
certification include ED/VEDR 341, EDF 589, EDP 531 and 550, 
EDS 505, EDT 500, and a subject area methods course. (Note: 
Some course work taken for certification may count for the M.Ed, in 
secondary education.) 

MASTER OF EDUCATION 

The master of education program has concentrations in chemistry, 
French, history, and Spanish, offered cooperati\'ely bj' the College 
of Education and the College of Arts and Sciences. The academic 
requirements for each concentration are found under the respective 
depMtment listing. 

With this degree, students can strengthen their knowledge in the major 
subject area, as well as their professionkil knowledge and competence. 
Students earning degrees in this program are advised primarily by 
their academic department representative but also must consult 
with a professional and secondary education adviser concerning the 
education portion of their program. Note: This program does not 
lead to teacher certification without additional course work. 

Curriculum 36 semester hours 

I. Professional Education Requirements* 12 semester hours 

A. EDF 510 

B. A minimum of one course from each of the follov»ring groups: 
Group 1 

EDF 516, 520, 580, 581, 589 
Group 2 

EDF 503, 507, 509; EDP 531, 550, 

557, 560, 569; EDS 524; EDU 502 
Group 3 

EDC 567; EDF 504, 505, 506, 570, 

590; EDS 502, EDU 501 



'Chosen in conference with the secondary education and academic advisers 
according to the student's needs. 



Protcsbional ami Sccondan' Education 



II. Concentration Requirements 21-23 semester hours 

A. EDF 500 (3) 

B. Academic subjects (18-20) 

(See respective academic department for details) 

III. Electives (Professional or Acadeniic)* 1-3 semester hours 

Comprehensive Examinations 

The stvidctit must perform satisfactorily on the final comprehensive 
examination covering the subject matter concentration and the pro- 
k'ssional education requirements. 

Teaching and Learning with Technology Program 

Dr. Kinslow, Coordinator 

The Teaching and Learning \vith Technology (TLT) Program consists 
of four, three-credit courses. The program is designed for practicing 
profession;ils who want to attain advanced competency in the use of 
instructional technolog)'. The focus of the program is to design 
enriched environments appropriately, using sound curricular ideas that: 
a) are linked to national educational standards and curriculum fi-ame- 
worLs, b) are grounded in research-based pedagogical practices, c) are 
tied to authentic assessment, and d) promote active learning by teach- 
ing with technology rather than simply about technology. An 



Educational Technology Certificate will be awarded to candidates who 
successfiilly complete the required courses. Three courses must come 
fi-om the core (EDT 500-503) and an additional approved elective is 
chosen, under advisement, as a fourth course. Candidates for the TLT 
program should meet requirements for WCU graduate study and 
complete a technology skills inventory. Based on the results of this 
assessment, students will be advised on recommended course sequence, 
and whether or not a basic computer course may be required. 

Certificate Program 



Curriculum 



12 semester hours 



I. 



II 



Required 

EDT 500, 501, and 502 
Electives (select one) 

ADM 502; BIO 515; CHE 524; CRL 524; CSC 512, 514, 550; 
EDT 503; ENV 530, 547; ESS 535; GEO 534; HIS 445; MIS 
501; MTE 560, 561, 562, 567, 568; MUE 515, 590, 591, 592 
Graduate workshops in special topics may be taken as electives 
under advisement (e.g.. EDF 599, or COM 599) 



'Chosen in conference with the secondary education and academic advisers 
according to the student's needs. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
COUNSELOR EDUCATION 

SvTObol: EDC 

540 Assessment Methods in Guidance (3) Em- 
phasis is on the test and nontest assessment of 
intelligence, achievement, special abilities, and 
aptitudes, including concepts such as reliability, 
validit)', and standardization. 

FOUNDATIONS 

Symbol: EDF 

500 Methods and Materials of Research in 
Education (3) Historical, descriptive, and experi- 
mental methods of research. Methods for locating, 
evaluating, interpreting, and reporting research 
data. Each student prepares a research prospectus. 

501 Research Methods for Teachers (3) 
Designed to offer a practical and accurate intro- 
duction to various research methods that can be 
applied to a classroom setting for improving 
teaching practices. 

502 Methods and Materials of Research for Coun- 
selor Education (3) Designed to enable the coun- 
selor to read e.\-perimental, quasi-experimental, de- 
scriptive, and correlational research reported In the 
professional journals. Both univariate and multivari- 
ate designs are emphasized. PREREQ: EDC 540. 

503 The Emerging Curriculum (3) Curriculum 
trends in the 1980s and 1990s, focusing on various 
refonn efforts and including issues of race, gender, 
class, and ethnicitj-. 

504 Middle School Workshop (3) PhUosophv, 
administration, curriculum, staff, and facilities nec- 
essar)' for the most efficient educational experience 
in the intermediate levels of school. 

505 Individually Prescribed Instruction (3) Indi- 
vidually prescribed instructional techniques as 
applied in the classroom and intensive learning cen- 
ters. Techniques of academic diagnosis, prescription 
production, and electronic learning. Students will 
have an opportunity to work directly with hardware 
and sofhvare components of an intensive learning 
center. (May be arranged as a worlcshop.) 

506 DesignandUseof Individualized Learning 
Packages (3) .\ renew of commercially available 
individualized learning activity packages that per- 
mit students to progress through a learning con- 



tinuum at their own pace. Students will be 
required to design and construct individualized 
learning packiiges in their teaching areas. 
507 Values Clarification in Human Relations (3) 
Knowledge of the theories of the values clarifica- 
tion processes as defined by Simon and others. 
Skills in application of the values clarification 
processes in personal decisions, in the classroom, 
and in society. (May be arranged as a workshop or 
as modularized independent swdy.) 

509 Contemporary Teaching Trends (3) Team 
teaching, programmed instruction, and various 
media of communication in the elementary and 
secondary schools are evaluated. Effective adapta- 
tion to newer practices is emphasized. 

510 Educational Foundations (3) History of 
education, integrated with educational philosophy 
and thought; the long evolution of education the- 
ory and issues. 

515 Federal and State Role in Education (2) The 
past, current, and hiturc role of the federal and 
state governments in education in the United 
States. Emphasis on applications to the Common- 
wealth of Pennsylvania. Impact of federal legisla- 
tion since 1958. 

516 Resource Allocation in the Schools (3) The 
relationship between the American economy and 
the efficient allocation of resources within school 
systems will be examined. Designed for teachers, 
administrators, school board members, and parents. 
520 Comparative Education (3) Major problems of 
education in a number of other countries are rcbted 
to similar problems in the United States. Contrasting 
purposes and philosophies, and differences in organi- 
zation and administration are analyzed. 

570 The Community/Junior College (3) An 
analysis of the programs, problems, and students 
of a two-year college. Emphasis on the develop- 
ment, special philosophies, and current issues 
relating to the community or iunior college. 
Designed for students preparing to be teachers 
and/or administrators in these colleges. 

580 History of American Education (3) Nature 
and direction of American education, smdied 
through Individual and group research. 

581 Philosophy of Education (3) Selected philoso- 
phies and their influence on educational principles 
and practices in a democratic social order. 



583 The American School as Social Narrative (3) 

An integrated exploration of the philosophical c-ul- 
ture, social, and physical foundations of schooling 
and education in the United States. 

589 Sociological Foundations of Education (3) 
Study of the socio-cultural influences on the struc- 
wrc of American educational institutions. 

590 School Law (3) Legal strucwre for educa- 
tional organization on state, intermediate, and 
local levels. Legal stams of the board of education; 
legal responsibilities of the teacher; legal responsi- 
bilities of the board of education to the student. 

598 Workshop in Secondary Education (3) 

599 Workshop in Professional Education (3) 

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY 

Symbol: EDT 

500 Integrating Educational Technologies for 
Effective Instruction (3) This course covers the 
breadth of the conceptual foundation needed to 
integrate technology into teaching. In tliis survey 
course, the focus is on learning a process for deter- 
mining which electronic tools and which methods 
for implementing them are appropriate for class- 
room situations. 

501 Using Internet Resources for Curriculum 
Development and .Assessment (3) .\n in-depth 
course utilizing Internet resources for curriculum 
design, development, and assessment. Particular 
attention will be paid to the process of moving the- 
ory into practice to improve student learning. 
Extensive exposure to Web-based technologies and 
on-line resources, including professional journals, 
will be required in order to enhance familiarity 
with current educational issues and best practices. 

502 Seminar and Field Experience in Educa- 
tional Technology (3) Supenised use of educa- 
tional technology integration in the field: clinical 
application of knowledge balancing the dj-namic 
relationship ot learning, teaching, and technology. 
Portfolio documentation of internship is required, 
as well as demonstration of professional skills and 
competencies, and pedagogical knowledge. PRE- 
REQi EDT 500 and 501. 

503 Learning and Leading vrith Technology (3) 
Participants will design comprehensive technology 
plans to create enhanced learning environments for 
all smdents to succeed. This course develops an 



Professional and Secondary Education: Educational Research 



informed leader involved with the change process in 
educational organization. The participants will ana- 
lyze the impact of technolog)' in the learning cn\i- 
ronment and identify key elements of professional 
development and support tor change. In addition, 
educators will become familiar with technology 
funding sources and the grantwriting process. 
529 Video Production for Researchers (3) 
Principles of video camera use and digital video 
editing techniques tor teachers. 

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Symbol: EDP 

531 Principles of Educational Testing (3) 

Designed to develop in teachers the skills impor- 
tant in the three areas of educational testing: 



teacher-made tests (objective and essay); comput- 
erized programs for grading and reporting results, 
and for improving the test quality through item- 
analysis procedure; and the evaluation of the psy- 
chometric characteristics of standardized tests. 

SECONDARY EDUCATION 

Symbol; EDS 

502 Secondary School Curriculum (3) Current 
practices and trends in reorganizing the secondary 
school curriculum in the major academic areas. 
The various integrating techniques. Curriculum 
development. 

505 General Methods and Field Experience for 
Secondary Teachers (3) Students develop strate- 
gies that v«ll increase the probability of their 



becoming successful classroom teachers. Topics 
include planning, instructional strategies, learning 
styles, motivation, and classroom management. 
Students will observe in area schools. 
524 Supervision of Student Teaching (3) 
Designed for teachers who cooperate, or expect to 
cooperate, in West Chester University's student 
teaching program. Basic principles, practices, mate- 
rials, and resources for an effective student teaching 
program. PREREQ^ Certification for teaching. 
590 Independent Study (1-3) Enrollment by per- 
mission only; number of credits determined by 
department. 
599 Workshop Secondary Exlucation (3) 



Educational Research 

Dr. Welsh, Program Coordinator 

The School of Education offers a degree program leading to the 
master of science in educational research. The degree is designed 
primarily for those desiring research positions in local school dis- 
tricts, but it is also appropriate for research positions in colleges and 
universities, community colleges, governmental agencies, regional 
educational laboratories, and industry. 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATIONAI. RESEARCH 

Admission Requirements 

To be admitted to the program, the applicant must have: 

1. A minimum overall GPA of 2.8 in undergraduate studies and 
2.8 in the major field. 

2. Satisfactory performance on the General Aptitude Test of the 
Graduate Record Examination. 

3. Personal interview with the coordinator ot the program. 
Any candidate admitted to graduate study, but not to the degree 
program in educational research, may take RES courses with the 
permission of the coordinator. There is no guarantee that courses 
taken by a nondegree student may later satisfy degree requirements 
for the M.S. in educational research. 

Degree Requirements 

1. Satisfactory completion of the curriculum outlined below. 

2. An overall GPA of 3.0 in graduate courses taken in the degree 
program. 

3. Satisfactory performance on the comprehensive examination. 

4. Completion of a research report or master's thesis, approved by 
the coordinator. 

Requirements for Admission to Degree Candidacy 

Upon completion of 12 semester hours, which must include PSY 
501 and EOF 500, candidates will be advanced to degree candidacy. 



provided they have maintained a minimum GPA of 3.0 and passed 
a qualifying examination. 

The Internship 

After mastery of the core courses (EDF 500, PSY 501 and 502, and 
RES 520), students will serve an internship with an outside agency, 
or in the Office of Institutional Research conducting educational 
research. During this period, students will use the skills they have 
developed to design and conduct a research project under the joint 
supervision of University and/or host institutional personnel. 

The Comprehensive Examination 

To be eligible for the comprehensive examination, the candidate must: 

1. Have completed at least 28 semester hours and all core courses 
prior to the semester in which the examination is taken. 

2. Have maintained an overall GPA ot at least 3.0. 

Candidates must indicate by letter their intention to take the examina- 
tion. The coordinator should receive this letter within the first 10 days 
of the semester in which the candidate wants to take the examination. 
Candidates who fail the comprehensive examination are permitted 
one re-examination after an inter\'al ot at least one semester but not 
more than two years. 

Curriculum 36-39 semester hours 

I. Required 31-33 semester hours 

CSC 550; EDC 540; EDF 500, 510; EDP 531, 
550; PSY 501, 502; RES 520. 590, 592 

II. Optional 

RES 610, 650, plus three-credit elective 

III. Electives 

CSC 515 or PSY 526 

Others to be determined by program coordinator. 



3 semester hours 
3 semester hours 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH 

Symbol: RES 

520 Research Design (3) Principles for efficient 
design of experiments and other types of studies. 
Sampling techniques, methods of analysis, threats 



to v;ilid inference. PRF.REQ: PSY 501. 
590 Independent Study in Educational Research 
(1-3) Research project, reports, readings in cduca- 
tion;il research. I'RKRF.Q; Coordinator's approval. 
592 Internship Program in Educational Research 
(3) Opportunity for students to design, conduct, 
and analj'ze a study and to prepare a report of the 



research. The internship is scr\ed in local educa- 
tional agencies, count)' offices, federal project cen- 
ters, the Pennsylvania Department of Education, or 
other research environments. The intern is super- 
vised by both host and University personnel. 
610 Thesis (3) 
650 Research Report (3) 



Psychology 



Environmental Education 

Dr. Mastrilli, Coordinator 

Graduate students interested in developing a concentration in the 
area of environmental education should contact the graduate pro- 
granrj coordinator. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION 

Symbol: EDO 

505 Environmental Education Design, Delivery, 
and Field Experience (3) Conservation education 
as it exists in the present school curriculum and 
ways to integrate conservation into elementary and 
secondary school disciplines. Characteristics, inter- 
relationships, and uses ot our natunJ resources; 
problems and policies of industrial management in 
conservation as they relate to the school curriculum. 



510 Methods in Conservation Education (3) Basic 

concepts and practices of conservation and outdoor 
education and their role in the school program. 

511 Environmental Education Workshop (3) A 
field-centered le;irning experience. Designed to 
integrate the wide range of backgrounds and inter- 
ests among the participants. Based on West Chester 
campus and/or the campuses of other universities. 
515 Environmental Education History, Theory, 
and Practice (3) Development ot the conservation 
movement in the U.S. with emphasis on the pro- 
gressive adaptation of conservation to our chang- 



ing social and economic order. 
520 Organization and Administration of Out- 
door Education (3) Basic concepts ot outdoor 
education: the role of outdoor education in the 
school program; the initiation and administration 
of outdoor education. 

525 Independent Studies in Environmental 
Education (3) Special research projects, reports, 
and readings in conservation and outdoor educa- 
tion. PREREQi Permission of coordinator 
598 Workshop in Environmental Education (3) 



Psychology 



Peoples Building 
West Chester University 
West Chester, PA 19383 
610-436-2945 
Dr. Duncan, Chairperson 

Dr. Yorgcs, Assistant Chairperson and Coordinator of Graduate 
Studies 

PROFESSORS 

Arvid Bloom, Ph.D., Colorado State University 

Deanne Zotter Bonifazi, Ph.D., Kent State University 

Phillip K. Duncan, Ph.D., University of Florida 

Sandra Kerr, Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony Brook 

V. Krishna Kumar, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison 

Deborah Mahlstedt, Ph.D., Temple University 

Jasmin T. McConatha, Ph.D., University of Georgia 

Walcna C. Morse, Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

Edward I. PoUak, Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

Louis H. Porter, Ph.D., Howard University 

Thomas Treadwell, Ed.D., Temple University 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Susan Cans, Ph.D., University of Chicago 

Loretta Rieser-Danner, Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

Stefani Yorges, Ph.D., Purdue University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Julian Azorlosa, Ph.D., University of Delaware 
Laurie Hyers, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Vanessa K. Johnson, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

Programs of Study 

The Department of Psychology offers the master of arts degree virith 
concentrations in clinic;il psychology, general psychology, and indus- 
tri;il/organizational psvcholog)'. 

Psychology Post-Master's Graduate Certificate in Clinical Mental 
Health in Preparation for Counseling Licensure. The post-master's 
certiticate program uill be an individualized program consisting of a 
minimum ot 12 credits. The program will be tailored to individual stu- 
dents based on their prior master's level course work and their interests. 



The admissions process will include the development of an individual- 
ized, planned course of study designed to allow students to complete 
course work in areas necessar)' to be eligible for Pennsylvania licensure 
as a professional counselor. Students, in close consultation with pro- 
gram advisers, will select courses from the current graduate offerings in 
the Department of Psychology. Courses will be selected by examining 
students' master's degree programs and determining their areas of need, 
based on the National Board of Certified Counselors (NBCC) criteria, 
and/or based on students' interests. These courses are as follows: 

EDC 556, PSY 501, 502, 506, 509, 512, 513, 521, 524, 526, 527, 

540, 543, 544, 547, 549, 559, 565, 595, 595, 615. 

Admission Requirements 

The minimum admission standards for the Department of Psychol- 
ogy are an undergraduate GPA of 3.0, a psychology' GPA for three 
or more courses of 3.25, GRE scores of 500 on both verbal and 
quantitative areas, and three letters of reference. An interview with 
the department admissions committee also may be required. 
T)'pically, admissions are made on a once-a-year basis with March 1 
serving as the application deadline. Students accepted into a con- 
centration mav, with the approval of the graduate committee, trans- 
fer to another concentration. A few applicants who do not ftilly , 
meet the outlined admission requirements may be admitted on a 
provisional basis depending on their maturity, relevant work experi- 
ences, and academic promise. 

MASTER OF ARTS IN PSYCHOLOGY 

(36-48 semester hours) 

Several degree options are offered. The master of arts degree is 
offered with a concentration in clinical psychology for students who 
wish to work in a mental health setting or to continue their educa- 
tion at the doctoral level. A concentration in general psychology is 
offered for students interested in research, teaching, or in continuing 
their graduate studies at the doctoral level. The concentration in 
industrial/organizational psychology is designed for students inter- 
ested in emplojTnent in business or industry' or for those who wish 
to continue their education at the doctoral level in a related area. 
Students mav have to take one or more coiu'ses during the summer to 
complete their program. Students in the general psycholog)' program 




l-'svcholoi^ 



must write a thesis. Students in the industrial/organizational program 
must complete an internship and a research report. Students in the 
clinical program must pass a comprehensive exam or write a thesis. 
More details about the program are available in the department's 
graduate handbook. 

Concentration: Clinical Psychology 

(48 semester hours) 

The clinical concentration involves the following required course 
work: PSY 501, 502, 517, 524, 527, 540, 544, 549, 559, 595, 615, 
and 616. Students also are required to take 15 semester hours of 
electives selected from PSY 506, 509, 512, 513, 514, 519, 530, 543, 
547, 550, 565, 568, 581, 590, 600, 610, and EDC 521, 556. In addi- 
tion, a two-semester-hour clinical practicum (PSY 615) and a four 
semester-hour clinical internship (PSY 616) are required. 

Concentration: General Psychology 

(36 semester hours) 

TTie following 15 semester hours of course work are required: PSY 
501, 502, 506, 509 or 512, and 524. All students in this concentration 
are required to complete a research report (PSY 600) and write a the- 



sis (PSY 610). All students also must complete 15 semester hours of 
electives. Subject to approval, sLx of the elective credits may be taken 
from the graduate offerings of other departments. (Note: No more 
than six semester hours of 400-lc\'el courses are allowed as electives.) 

Concentration: Industrial/Organizational Psychology 

(39-42 semester hours) 

The industrial/organizational concentration includes 21 semester 
hours of required course work (PSY 501, 502, 524, 560, 562, 563, and 
566). A three-credit internship (PSY 630) and a three-credit research 
experience (PSY 600) also are required. In addition, students must 
take at least four elective courses which, in combination with their 
internship and research experience, will enable them to explore a par- 
ticular aspect of the field in greater depth. The elective courses may be 
taken outside of the Department of Psychology. Courses restricted to 
clinical psychology majors cannot be taken as electives. With careful 
selection of electives, internship, and research focus, students will be 
able to develop specialization in performance analysis and training, 
personnel evaluation and placement, or aspects of group and organiza- 
tional processes in industrial/organizational psychologv'. Students may, 
with permission, enroll for the thesis (PSY 610) for three hours. 
Students electing the thesis option will complete 42 semester hours. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS' 
PSYCHOLOGY 

Symbol: PSY 

501 Introductory Statistics for the Behavioral 
Sciences (3) Central tendency, variability, standard 
scores, correlation, probabilit)', sampling, tests of 
hypotheses, "t" test, chi square, distribution-free 
statistics, and introduction to analysis of variance. 

502 Advanced Statistics for Behavioral Sciences 
(3) This course covers inferential statistical tech- 
niques with emphasis on application to research in 
psychology and related areas. PREREQ: PSY 501 
or equivalent. 

506 Learning and Cognition (3) Survey and crit- 
ical review of existing theories ot learning and rel- 
evant research data. 

509 Advanced Social Psychology (3) Emphasizes 
contemporary approaches to the study of social 
behavior including cognitive, social, and experimen- 
tal and quasi-experimental research methodology. 

512 Psychology of Personality (3) The interac- 
tion and etTccts offerees that influence personality 
development. Normal and neurotic development 
arc contrasted. Principles of personality measure- 
ment arc explored. 

513 Group Interventions I (3) This course intro- 
duces theorj' and practice of psychodrama as a psy- 
chotherapeutic modality, emphasizing psychodra- 
matic and sociomctric techniques. It gives each per- 
son a chance to participate in using sociometry and 
psychtxlrama techniques and integrates the theoreti- 
cal with the applied components of psychodrama. 

514 Group Interventions II (3) Continuation of 
PSY 513 at an advanced level with emphasis on 
clinical sociometry, the social atom concept, auxil- 
iary ego techniques, and directing. Instruction will 
include both didactic and experiential modes. 
517 Adult Psychopathology (3) Advanced study 
of abnormal human behavior and a description of 
pertinent t)'pes, including symptoms, causes, and 
treatment. Current and recent theoretical approach- 
es and research findings relevant to the etiology and 
treatment of these disorders. PREREQ^ An under- 
graduate course in abnormal psychologj' and PSY 
512, or equivalents, or permission of instructor. 
519 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology (3) 



Advanced study of abnormal ch'dd and adolescent 
behavior including symptoms, causes, and treat- 
ment. Current and recent theoretical approaches 
and research findings relevant to the etiology and 
treatment of these disorders. PREREQ^ A course 
in developmental psychology, PSY 512 and PSY 
517 or equivalents, or permission of instructor. 
524 Psychometrics: Measurement and 
Evaluation (3) A survey ot measurement theory in 
psycholog)' with emphasis on the logic of meas- 
urement, scaling models, statistical methods, con- 
struction of valid and rehable measures. PRE- 
REQ: PSY 501 or equivalent. 

526 Program Evaluation (3) A survey of proce- 
dures for planning and evaluating programs in 
psychology, education, government services, health 
and welfare, etc. Topics include needs analysis, 
statement of objectives, definition and verification 
of treatment, operational measures, evaluation 
design, analysis/interpretation ot data, and report 
writing. Case studies of evaluation trom a variety 
of disciplines will be reviewed. 

527 Cognitive and Behavior Therapy (3) 
Application of learning principles and environ- 
mental control to behavior change. Foundation 
principles, techniques, and assessment methods ot 
modification. PREREQ: PSY 506 or equivalent. 
530 Human Sexual Behavior (3) The study of 
those variables under which human sexual behavior 
functions. Research from sociological and medical 
studies is integrated with psychological knowledge. 
540 Multicultural Psychology (3) An exploration 
of the ways in which diversity, discrimination, 
racism, and power both internationally and within 
the U.S. affects our self image, identity, and rela- 
tionship with others. 

543 Psychology of Group Processes (3) Survey of 
psychological group processes, tracing the origins 
and historical development of the major theoreti- 
cal orientations. 

544 Intelligence Testing (3) Historical develop- 
ment, administration, scoring, and interpretation 
of the Wechsler scales. PREREQ: PSY 524 or 
equivalent. By permission only (usually restricted 
to clinical psychology majors). 

547 Interpersonal Relationships (3) A study of 
processes and factors in establishing, maintaining. 



and terminating relationships via the use of group 
methods. 

549 Personality Assessment (3) History and the- 
ory of personality testing. Introduction to admin- 
istration, scoring, and interpretation of projective 
and objective techniques. PREREQ: PSY 517 or 
equivalent. Clinical psychology majors, or others 
with permission of instructor. 

550 Independent Studies in Psychology (1-3) 
Research projects, reports, and readings in psy- 
chology PREREQi Approval of department grad- 
uate coordinator. 

559 Psychotherapy (3) Theoretical considerations, 
principles, techniques, and problems involved in 
counseling and psychotherapy. Usually restricted 
to clinical psvchology majors. PREREQ^ PSY 512 
and 517 or equivalents. 

560 Industrial Psychology (3) Apphcation of 
individual differences, learning, and aptitudes to 
functions such as personnel selection, placement, 
training, and evaluation. 

562 Organizational Psychology (3) Focus on the 
relation between the individual and the organiza- 
tion. Elements of the organization that affect 
behavior are considered. Research designs appro- 
priate to individual cases are presented. 

563 Performance Analysis (3) An accomplish- 
ment-based approach to the analysis of human 
performance. Topics include measurement and 
analysis of performance opportunities and strate- 
gies for improving performance. 

564 Human Factors (3) Methods and results of 
experimental psychology pertinent to human- 
machine relationship problems. Workplace design, 
systems approach, control and display, and man- 
in-space challenges arc considered. 

565 Psychology of Women (3) A study of behav- 
iors and experiences of women; biologic:il, culniral, 
interpersonal, and intrapcrsonal determinants of 
women's actions, thoughts, and feelings are explored. 



*A11 courses in the Department of Psychology are 
restricted to those students who have been admit- 
ted to a degree program by the Department of 
Psycholog)', or to those who have received special 
permission from the Department of Psychology 
graduate coordinator. 



Social Work 



566 Scmiiiiir in IndusCrisJ/Organizacional 
Psychology (3) A «;coiid-yc;ir capstone course 
covering a variety <>t current issues in I/O selected 
by students and instructor PREREQ: PSY 501, 
502, 524, 560, 562, 563. 

567 Psychology and Training (3) An ovcrvicu' of the 
training process in orgvuiizations. Topics range from 
needs an;ilvsis to cv.iluation of training prograins. 

568 Pfiychopharmacology (3) An introduction to 
the mechanisms ot action, eflects, and side effects of 
those psychoactive drugs most commonly encoun- 
tered by mental he;Jth practioners. Both psychother- 
apeutic dnigs and drugs of abuse will be discussed. 
The course will foc-us on the implications of these 
drugs for our understanding of the neurochemical 
basis of both normal and abnormiJ behavior. PRE- 
REQ^ An undergraduate course in physiological 
psycholog)' and PS Y 5 1 7 or consent of instructor. 
581 Kating Disorders (3) An in-depth study of 
anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and other variants 
of disordered eating. 

590 Topical Seminar in Psychology (1-3) Special 
topics in psychology not offered under existing 
regularly offered courses. PREREQ; Permission of 
instructor or graduate coordinator 
595 Ethics and Professional Skills in Clinical 
Practice (3) Study ot the ethical practice of indi- 
vidual counseling and psychotherapy with a focus 



on ethical standards and process-oriented tech- 
niques. Restricted to clinical psychology majors. 
PREREQ: PSY 517 and 559. 
600 Research Report (3) An original review of 
the literature. 

610 Thesis (3-6) An original empirical study. 
PREREQ; Permission ot graduate coordinator. 

615 Clinical Practicum in Psychology (2-6) 
Supervised protessional participation in applied 
psychological activities, or projects in cooperating 
agencies and institutions. PREREQ; PSY 502, 
512, 517, 524, 544 or 549, 559, and 595. Restricted 
to chnical psychology majors and recommendation 
ot graduate clinical taculty. 

616 Internship in Clinical Psychology (4-12) 
Supervised experience in professional psychological 
activities. Internship builds on skills developed in PSY 
615 and is completed in cooperation with area mental 
health ;igcncies and institutions. PREREQ; PSY 615. 
620 Practicum in School Psychology (3) 
Supervised experience as a school psychologist. 
Offered tor students seeking out-of-state certifica- 
tion as a school psychologist. (West Chester 
University does not presently offer a program 
leading to certification as a school psychologist in 
the Commonwealth ot Pennsylvania.) 

630 Internship in Industrial/Organizational 



Psychology (3) Supervised professional participa- 
tion in applied psychological activities within a 
business or organizational setting. PREREQ; 
Permission of instructor. 
The following 400-levcl course is firequcntly 
taken for graduate credit. 

445 Organizational Development (3) Major the- 
oretical, research, and applied issues in organiza- 
tional diagnosis and change. Class sessions are 
experientiallv oriented. 

These additional 400-level courses may be taken 
for elective graduate credit with the permission of 
the course instructor and the student's program 
ad\'iser, and/or the Department of Psychology 
graduate coordinator: PSY 443 (Psychology of 
Group Processes); 445 (Organizational Develop- 
ment); 464 (Physiological Psycholog)); 470 (Sensory 
and Perceptual Processes); 475 (Cognitive Psychol- 
ogy); 480 (Neuropsychological Rehabilitation); 490 
(Topical Seminar in Psychology). 
Descriptions of these courses can.be found in the 
current West Chester University Undergraduate 
Catalog and on the Web at www.wcupa.edu. 
Requirements in addition to those existing for 
undergraduates arc imposed for any 400-lcvel 
course taken for graduate credit. No more than 
six credits of 400-level course work may be 
applied toward a graduate degree. 



Reading — See Literacy 

Secondary Education — See Professional and Secondary Education 



Social Work - Graduate 

Reynolds Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2664 

Dr. Abbott, Chairperson and M.S. W. Program Director 

Dr. Siegel, M.S.W. Curriculum Chair 

Prof. Bradley, Director of Field Practice 

PROFESSOR 

Ann A. Abbott, Ph.D., Br\n Maivr College 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Gwenelle O'Neal, D.S.W., Columbia University 
David I. Siegel, D.S.W., Columbia University 

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Nadine Bean, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University 
Linda Ello, Ph.D., Rutgers - The State University 
Sharon Owens, Ph.D., Clark Atlanta University 

Program of Study 

The Department of Social Work is approved to offer the M.S.W. by 
West Chester University and the State System of Higher 
Education. The program is accredited bv the Council on Social 
Work Education (CSWE). 

The M.S.W. is a 60-hour program with a concentration in direct 
practice writh indiNiduals, families, and communities. The program can 
be completed in t\vo academic wars fiill time and four vears part time; 
however, applicants holding a B.S.W. firom a CSWT-accredited pro- 
gram ma)- qualil}- for advanced standing and reduce their time of 
enrollment. The first year ot study focuses on foundation or generalist 



social work practice, and the second year focuses on the concentration. 
Besides course work, students are placed for internships in social serv- 
ice agencies concurrendy with practice courses. Advanced study in 
working with individuals, families, and communities is augmented by 
six hours of graduate-level electives taken in the department or 
throughout the University. Also, as a requirement for graduation, stu- 
dents complete a practice research paper and formally defend it. 
Students applying to the program should meet the foUowing criteria: 

• GPA of 3.00 (students who do not meet this requirement may 
be considered for provisional status) 

• Competency is required in the following areas: humanities, 
English composition, college math, political science, sociology, 
psychology, and human biology. Competency can be verified by 
completed course work, CLEP examination, or comprehensive 
examination. Applications without these core liberal arts require- 
ments will be reviewed; however, applicants will be required to 
submit proof of competency prior to enrolling in the program. 

• TOEFL score if applicant is not a native English speaker 

• appropriate visa for international students 

• evidence applicant has complied with Act 33 and criminal clearance 
check (required for students' internships in social service agencies) 

A limited number of advanced-standing slots are open to students 
holding a B.S.W. from a program accredited by the CSWT. This 
optional form of program admittance allows the student to enter the 
program during the summer, enroll in three "bridge" courses, and 
move direcdy into the concentration (second) vear. Those with 
advanced-standing status can complete the program in one year full 
time or two years part time. To qualify for this level of enrollment. 



Social Work 



applicants must meet the minimum criteria as follows: 

• B.S.W. from a CSWE-accreditcd program within the last five yeari 

• a GPA of 3.25 (based on a 4.0 scale) in the social work major 

• an overall cumulative GPA of 3.0 (based on a 4.0 scale) 

• an advanced standing recommendation completed by the direc- 
tor of the B.S.W. program that granted their degree 

• all requirements set for regular admission to the M.S.W. pro- 
gram (see above) 

• no grades lower than a B in the following undergraduate courses: 
two courses in practice, two courses in policy, two courses in 
human behavior in the social environment, one course in 
research methods, one course in statistics, a field experience of at 
least 400 clock hours supervised by an M.S.W. field instructor 

Because the number of admission slots for advanced standing is 
limited, students who do not meet the criteria or are not admitted 
to this status because it is already filled automatically will be 
reviewed for regular admission. 

Students appl)ing to the program who have completed work in other 
accredited M.S.W. programs should make an appointment with the 
director to review official transcripts of previously completed work. 
Courses for transfer credit will be evaluated for compatibility with the 
West Chester University M.S.W. curriculum on the basis of similarity 
in course objectives, text books, assignments, and required readings. 
Only practice and policy courses from CSWE-accreditcd programs 
will be considered for transfer into the practice and policy sequences. 
Students wishing to transfer credits taken in programs other than 
social work may petition to have courses in human behavior, 
research, and elective areas considered. The same criteria referred to 
above will apply to these requests. 

Transfer requests should be put in writing with supportive documen- 
tation - transcript and course syllabi - and submitted to the director. 
Transfer credit is limited to courses in which a grade of A or B was 
attained. No credit is given for prior life or employment experiences. 

MASTER OF SOCIAL WORK 

Course of Study 

Typically, M.S.W. students enroll in 15 hours each semester. The pro- 
gram is broken down into two segments, the foundation and concen- 
tration years. Following is the course of study generally taken by stu- 
dents in the program. 

REGULAR FULL-TIME PROGRAM 

Year I 

Fall Semester 15 semester hours 

SWG 501, 511, 541, 554, and 596 
Spring Semester 15 semester hours 

SWG 502, 533, 555, 564, and 597 
Year II 
Fall Semester 15 semester hours 

SWG 534, 561, 562, and 598 

500-600 level elective* 
Spring Semester 15 semester hours 

SWG 535, 542, 563, and 599 

500-600 level elective* 

PART-TIME, FOUR-YEAR PROGRAM 

A part-time study plan is offered to a select number of students. TTiose 
admitted to this plan must commit themselves to the following schedule: 



Yearl 

Fall Semester 

SWG 511 and 541 
Spring Semester 

SWG 533 and 555 
Year II 
Fall Semester 

SWG 501, 554, and 596 
Spring Semester 

SWG 502, 564, and 597 
Year III 
Fall Semester 

SWG 561, 562, and 598 
Spring Semester 

SWG 542, 563, and 599 
Year IV 
Fall Semester 

SWG 534 

500-600 level elective* 
Spring Semester 

SWG 535 

500-600 level elective* 



6 semester hours 
6 semester hours 

9 semester hours 
9 semester hours 

9 semester hours 
9 semester hours 

6 semester hours 

6 semester hours 



ADVANCED-STANDING, FULL-TIME PROGRAM 

Students enrolling fiiU time in the advanced-standing track follow 

the course schedule below: 

First Summer Session (May -June) 6 semester hours 

SWG 503 and 511 
Second Summer Session (June - July) 3 semester hours 

SWG 564 
Fall Semester 15 semester hours 

SWG 534, 561, 562, and 598 

500-600 level elective* 
Spring Semester 15 semester hours 

SWG 535, 542, 563, and 599 

500-600 level elective* 



ADVANCED-STANDING, PART-TIME PROGRAM 


Students enrolling part time in 


the advanced-standing track follow 


the course schedule below: 






First Summer Session (May -J 


une) 


6 semester hours 


SWG 503 and 511 






Second Summer Session (June 


-July) 


3 semester hours 


SWG 564 






Yearl 






Fall Semester 




9 semester hours 


SWG 561, 562, and 598 






Spring Semester 




9 semester hours 


SWG 542, 563, and 599 






Year II 






Fall Semester 




6 semester hours 


SWG 534 






500-600 level elective* 






Spring Semester 




6 semester hours 


SWG 535 






500-600 level elective* 







'Elcctivcs can be taken outside of the department with approval and also dur- 
ing the summer. 



COURSK DESCRIPTIONS 
SOCIAL WORK 

Symbol: SWG 

501 Social Work Practice I (3) This course pro- 
vides an introduction to generalise social work 



practice including its models, purpose, method, 
values, and ethics. It incorporates a problem-solv- 
ing framework and ecological systems perspective 
and stresses the influence ot divcrsit)' on practice. 
502 Social Work Practice II (3) This course 



focuses on change theories, intervention strategies, 
and extended knowledge and skills for working 
with individuals, families, groups, communities, 
and organizations. PRKRRQ: SWG 501. 
503 Integrative Social Work Bridge Course (3) 



Social Work 




This course, required ot .ill .n.iv.iiited-standing stu- 
dents, provides preparation for entry into the sec- 
ond year concentration in direct practice with 
individuals, families and communities. It integrates 
foundation values, knowledge, and skills from the 
content areas of social work practice, human 
behavior in the social environment, social welfare 
policy, social work research, and field practicum. 
PRF.RF.Q: Admission to the advanced-standing 
M.S.W. program. 

511 Human Behavior in the Social 
Environment: The Dialecric of Oppression and 
Liberation (3) Within the context of a diverse and 
stratified society, this course examines the impact 
of discrimination and oppression on members ot 
special groups, i.e., ethnic minorities, women, eld- 
erly, disabled, gays, and lesbians while considering 
the effects of diversity on human behavior and 
attitudes. It also considers the richness of human 
diversity. 

533 Methods of Social Work Research (3) This 
course provides students with a theoretical foun- 
dation in the method ot social work research. The 
characteristics of scientific inquiry, the structure ot 
theories, problem and hypothesis formulation, 
models of research design, sampling, measure- 
ment, and the logic of casual inferences are taught. 

534 Advanced Research Methods (3) In this 
course students learn advanced qualitative and 
quantitative data analysis skills, evaluation of one's 
own practice, and program evaluation. Particular 
attention is given to preparation for the student's 
applied research project. PREREQ: SWG 533. 

535 Applied Social Work Research Seminar (3) 
Under the direction of a faculty member, M.S.W. 
candidates in the seminar propose, complete, and 
defend a research project that demonstrates their 
command of theory integration and research 
methodology as it applies to social work practice. 
Successful completion of this capstone course satis- 
fies the Office of Graduate Studies requirement for 
a comprehensive examination for a master's degree. 
PREREQ: SWG 534. 

541 Social Welfare Policy and Services (3) This 
course emphasizes the historical, economic, politi- 
cal, and philosophical foundations of American 
social welfare policy. 

542 Advanced Social Work Policy Analysis and 
Change (3) This course emphasizes advanced level 
critical and comparative analysis ot social policy. 
Theories of social and organizational change, 
administration, and legislative advocacy also are 
reviewed and applied to pohcv implementation. 
PREREQ: SWG 541. 

554 Human Behavior in the Social 
Environment (3) This course uses a developmen- 
tal and ecological perspective to explore the inter- 
action of biological, psychological, and sociocultu- 
ral systems, and the influence ot human diversity 
and economics as determinants of human behavior 
of individuals and families. 

555 Human Behavior in Family, Groups, and 



Communities (3) Using both critical and systems 
approaches, this mezzo/macro level course focuses 
on assessing the impact of diversity, culture, and 
oppression on group, organizational, and commu- 
nity development. Multicentric models of group, 
organizational, and community behavior will be 
explored and implications for social work practice 
examined. PREREQ: SWG 511 and 541. 

561 Advanced Social Work Practice with 
Individuals (3) Building on the problem-solving 
framework, this course focuses on theory-integrated 
practice. Particular attention is given to psychologi- 
cal, cognitive/behavioral, and social structural theo- 
ries. PREREQ: SWG 502; COREQ: SWG 598. 

562 Advanced Social Work Practice with 
Families (3) This course will include advanced 
knowledge and skills for work with families. The 
focus is on the major theoretical approaches to 
work with families, including family systems, 
structural family therapy, and symbolic experiential 
famUy therapy. PREREQ: SWG 502; COREQ: 
SWG 598. 

563 Advanced Social Work Practice in Commun- 
ities (3) This course will focus on approaches to 
social change in communities including planning, 
locality development, and social action models of 
community organization. Emphasis will be placed 
on advocacy, empowerment, and social justice with 
locational, identificational, and interest communi- 
ties. PREREQ: SWG 502; COREQ: SWG 599. 

564 Human Behavior in the Social Environ- 
ment: Mental Health and Illness (3) Using a bio- 
psycho-social ecological template for analysis, this 
course examines major childhood, adolescent, and 
adult psychiatric disorders. The impact of the med- 
ical model, the DSM IV, and managed care are 
evaluated in light of social work values and prac- 
tice. PREREQ: SWG 511, 541, 554. 

570 Social Work and Chemical Dependency (3) 
This course reviews the major approaches to 
understanding chemical dependency and to the 
assessment and treatment with individuals, fami- 
lies, and groups. The pharmacology of drugs and 
alcohol and the nature of the addiction is included 
as is the influence of culture, ethnicity, gender, the 
peer group, and social deviance. 

571 Social Work with Older Adults (3) This 
course reviews the status and position ot older 
Americans in society, the community, and the 
social service delivery system. There is a focus on 
social work assessment and intervention with eld- 
erly clients regarding issues of health, chronic ill- 
ness, intellectual and emotional status, depression 
and dementia, relations with the family, care-giv- 
ing social networks, poverty, retirement, death, and 
bereavement. Specific approaches to working with 
older adults are reviewed. PREREQ: SWG 502 or 
permission of instructor. 

573 Advanced Theory and Practice with Severe 
Mental Illness (3) This course focuses on diag- 
nostic theories and principles of assessment and 
intervention with the serverely mentally ill. PRE- 



REQ^ .SWG 502, 564, or permission ot instructor. 

574 Micro-Practice in Occupational/Industrial 
Social Work (3) This course covers theory, knowl- 
edge, and skills necessary for conducting micro- 
level practice in workplace settings. PREREQ^ 
SWG 502 or permission of instructor. 

575 Social Work Administration (3) This course 
is designed to provide students with knowledge of 
the theory of social administration and adminis- 
trative practice skills for work in social agencies. It 
incorporates managerial fiinctions, organizational 
design, technological innovation, and the social 
work mission and value base on behalf of clients in 
social agencies. 

576 Social Work in Child Welfare (3) This 
course focuses on the characteristics, strengths, 
and service needs of families and children in the 
child welfare system. It examines issues and builds 
practice skills related to assessing risk to safety in 
families, child maltreatment, famUy preservation 
services, and substitute care such as kinship care, 
foster care, residential treatment facilities, and per- 
manency planning including adoption. PREREQ^ 
SWG 502 or permission ot instructor 

590 Seminar in Social Work (3) In-depth topics 
in social work offered to complement the pro- 
gram's concentration and not offered in required 
courses. 

591 Independent Study in Social Work (1-3) An 
independent project developed by a student under 
the guidance of a specific faculty member. 

596 Practicum I (3) This course is a structured 
field experience at an approved social agency for 
250 hours during the semester. Students learn the 
beginning application of the generalist model of 
practice and professional social work roles. 
COREQ: SWG 501, 554. 

597 Practicum II (3) This course involves a struc- 
tured field experience at an approved agency for 
250 hours during the semester. Students continue 
developing the role of beginning professional 
social worker and methods of social work practice 
while using the generalist model. PRERQ^ SWG 
596; COREQ: SWG 502, 564. 

598 Practicum III (3) This course involves a 
structured field experience at an approved social 
agency for a total of 300 hours for the semester 
Students incorporate advanced-level intervention 
skills with individuals, families, and communities 
into their professional roles. PREREQ^ SWG 
597; COREQ: SWG 561,562. 

599 Praticum IV (3) This course involves a struc- 
tured field experience at an approved social agency 
for a total of 300 hours during the semester. The 
student's experience in field practice culminates 
through coordination within the professional role: 
integration of theory to practice with individuals, 
families, and communities; knowledge of the 
impact of social policy; the role of research in prac- 
tice; and the influence of diversity and oppression. 
PREREQ: SWG 598; COREQ^SWO 563. 



Sociology — See Anthropology and Sociology 

Special Education — See Early Childhood and Special Education 



Jill Teaching English as a Second Language 



Teaching English as a Second Language (TESL) 



107 Main Hall 

West Chester Universirv 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2752 

Dr. Grove, Coordinator 

PROFESSORS 

Garren G. Molholt, Ph.D. (English) 
Frederick R. Panon, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Dennis L. Godfrey, Ph.D. (English) 
Charles E. Grove, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 
Cheri L. Micheau, Ph.D. (English) 
Andrea Varricchio, Ph.D. (Foreign Languages) 

Programs of Study 

The master of arts in teaching English as a second language is an 
interdisciplinary program contributed to by the departments of 
English, Foreign Languages, Anthropology' and Sociology, 
Communication Studies, and Philosophy. The program is designed 
for those preparing to teach English to students whose first language 
is not English; graduates of this program are also prepared to design 
ESL/EFL curriculum and to assess the linguistic development of 
second language students. Students wishing to enter the program 
must consult the coordinator. Also offered is the certificate of prepa- 
ration in ESL teaching, a graduate program that prepares graduates 
for EFL or ESL teaching in the U.S. and abroad. The certificate 
courses may be applied toward the M.A. in TESL. Along with 
required certification in another discipline, this certificate qualifies 
graduates for public school ESL teaching in Pennsylvania. Both the 
M.A. and certificate programs provide background in linguistics, 
sociolinguistics and culture, and teaching methodology in TESL. 

Admission Requirements 

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to a 
graduate program at West Chester, applicants must document back- 
ground in the following areas: (1) Introduction to Linguistics (sub- 
ject to approval by a TESL program adviser); (2) 24 semester hours 
of foreign language/EnglishAinguistics/philosophy/communications; 
(3) six semester hours of anthropologv'/sociology/psychology; (4) 
experience in learning a second language; (5) proficiency in English. 
A minimum TOEFL score of 580 is required of all non-native 



speakers of English for admission to the TESL program. Students 
with a TOEFL score slightly lower than 580 may be admitted pro- 
visionally to the TESL program. Provisionally admitted students 
will, in consultation with their adviser, select additional English lan- 
guage courses in order to meet this language proficiency require- 
ment by the time of degree candidacy (after 12-15 credits). 
Students who do not meet the foreign language or linguistics back- 
ground requirements upon application for admission may be admit- 
ted provisionally and, in consultation with their adviser, will select 
additional courses in order to satisfy these requirements by the time 
of degree candidacy (after 12-15 credits). Students must pass an oral 
and written comprehensive examination before graduating. 

MJl. in TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND 
LANGUAGE (TESL) 



36 semester hours 
24 semester hours 



Curriculum 

I. Required Courses 

ENG 575, 576, 581, 587; ENG/LAN 582 or 

UN 540; ENG/UN 583; LAN 500, 503 

Students submitting equivalent courses for any of the above may 

substitute, under advisement, courses from the electives below. 

II. Electives 12 semester hours 
Selected from the electives below. At least one course must be 
selected from Group 1 and one from Group 2. 

Group 1: ENG 577, 579, 582*, 589 (seminar with a 
Unguistic focus); LIN 503, 540; LIN/COM 515 
(or other LIN/COM courses) 

Group 2: ENG 580, 586, 588, 589 (seminar with a 

methodology focus), 610, 611; ENG/LAN 612; LAN 
504, 505, 580, 590, 600; LIN 504, 505, 512, and 590 

Certificate of Preparation in ESL Teaching 

The certificate of preparation in ESL teaching plus a valid 
Pennsylvania Instructional I or II Certificate are required for ESL 
instructors in Pennsylvania public schools effective at the start of 
the 2004-2005 school year. 

Curriculum 18 semester hours 

I. Required Courses 18 semester hours 

ENG 575, 576, 587; LAN 500, 503; ENG/LAN 582 or LIN 540 

'Either ENG 582 or I.IN 540 rc-quircd; the other course nay count as a 
Group 1 elective. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND 
LANGUAGE 

Symbols: ENG (English), LIN (Linguistics), 
LAN (Foreign Languages) 

ENG 575 Structure of Modem English (3) 

Analysis of the details and system ot English 
grammar. Consideration of alternate approaches in 
analyzing English sentences. Application of analy- 
ses to grammar instruction. 
ENG 576 Curriculum and Materials for TESL 
(3) Application ot basic second !angu.igc learning 
principles to the analysis, development, and imple- 
mentation of ESL materials, learner assessment 
instruments, and curriculum design. 
ENG 579 History and Dialects of American 
English (3) Exploration of the historical, cultural, 
social, and linguistic conditions and processes con- 
tributing to the development of varieties of Amer- 
ican English. Linguistic and sociolinguistic analy- 
sis of varieties of American English, including 
regional, social, and gender varieties, as well as 



register. Consideration of implications of nonstan- 
dard language varieties for education. 
ENG 581 Teaching Reading and Writing to 
ESL/Second Language Students (3) ESL/second 
language reading and writing research and thcor)'; 
connections to first language/literacy models; 
techniques, materials, and tasks that facilitate the 
acquisition ot ESL/second language literacy. 
ENG/LAN 582 Sociolinguistic Issues in 
ESL/Second l^anguage Education (3) Introduction 
to social, historical, legal, and cultural Issues influenc- 
ing language use and language learning in language 
minorit)' communities, schools, and homes. 
Introduction to issues in bilingual education and lan- 
guage programs for immigrants around the world. 
ENG/LIN 583 Second Language Acquisition 
(SIA) (3) Introduction to key issues in SLA 
research and theory. Analysis of SLA studies and 
connection to second language teaching. Design of 
original mini-study of second language learning. 
ENG 586 Field Experiences and Issues in ESL 
Teaching (3) Provides opportunities tor students 



to observe ESL instruction in a variety ot settings, 
as well as assist ESL instructors in the classroom, 
including elementary, secondary, university, and 
adult community programs. Discussion and proj- 
ects allow students to connect their experiences 
and observations to current TESL theory and 
trends introduced in course readings. 
ENG 587 ESL Practicum I (1-6) Assists students 
in developing ESL teaching skills. Encourages 
reflection on practice and examination ot personal 
beliefs on practice. 

ENG 588 ESL Practicum 11(1-3) This course is 
designed for graduate students and ESI, profession- 
als who desire addition;il practical experience in 
ESL contexts. Special topics covered include some 
of the following; program design, teacher develop- 
ment and supervision, and materials writing. 
VJSG 610Teaching ESL/Second Language to 
Elementary/Secondary Students (3) locu.ses on 
special language-learning needs ot ESL/second 
language students in elementary, middle, and high 
school, as well as on trends in teaching second lan- 
guage to these groups, including literature-based. 



Women's Studies 



thcmc-bascd, jrul vocutionjlly iinciitcd instruction. 
ENG 611 Content-Based ESIVSecond Language 
Instruction (3) Designed tor teachcR of content 
areas, as well as for ESLVsecond language teachers. 
Examines program models, curriculum design, mate- 
rials adaptation, and evaluation/assessment that com- 
bine language and content. Students consider short- 
comings ot this second language teaching trend. 



ENG/I AN 612 Assessment of ESL/Sccond 
Language Students (3) Selection, evaluation, adap- 
tation, and creation of assessment instruments for 
ESL/sccond language students. Practice in admin- 
istering tests and interpreting results. Overview of 
issues in assessing second language students. 
LIN501 Introduction to Linguistics (3) Analysis 
and characterization ot what humans know when 



they know a language, including knowledge ol the 
sound, word formation, sentence structure, meaning, 
and pragmatic systems. Development of tools and 
skills for describing and anal)'zing language. 
Application of linguistic principles to such cross-dis- 
ciplinary studies of language as sociolinguistics, lan- 
guage classitication, and language acquisition. 



Theatre and Dance 

BG-18 E.O. Bull Center 

West Chester Universit}' 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-3463 

Professor Berkowitz, Chairperson 

PROFESSORS 

Robert E. B}.-tnar, M.F.A., University of Pittsburgh 
Yoko Hashimoto-Sinclair, Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Harvey Rovinc, Ph.D., University of Illinois 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS 

Jay Berkowitz, M.A., Temple University 

Gretchen Studlien-Webb, M.F.A., Temple University 



ASSISTANT PROFESSORS 

Juliet Wunsch, M.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University 

INSTRUCTOR 

Joan Mary Morgan, M.F.A., Brandeis University 
Jane Saddoris, M.A., Villanova University 
The Department of Theatre and Dance does not offer a graduate 
degree. Graduate level courses are open to those who hold a bac- 
calaureate degree and meet West Chester University standards for 
admission to graduate studies. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
THEATRE 

Symbol: THA 

506 Theatre Theory and Production (3) A sur- 



vey of theatre history and practice. Students select 
specific areas of production and style for presenta- 
tion, analysis, and research. 
516 Theatre and Application of Creative 
Dramatics (3) The use of creative dramatics as a 



teaching method in the classroom. Practice and 
application of theories and techniques. 
550 Summer Drama Workshop (1-6) A combi- 
nation of instruction and applied production expe- 
riences. Offered in summer only. 



Women's Studies 

211 Mam Hall 

West Chester University 

West Chester, PA 19383 

610-436-2464 

Dr. Ramanathan, Director 

Prog^rams of Study 

Women's Studies offers a bachelor of arts, as well as a minor, for 
undergraduate students. 

Graduate students may pursue a master of science in administration 
degree with a concentration in leadership for women. This concen- 



tration involves six courses in administrative skill areas and six addi- 
tional courses that enable the student to develop a mode of leader- 
ship appropriate to workplaces in which access to organizational 
power is inequitable for women and men of equal training and tal- 
ent. The University also offers an 18-semester-hour leadership for 
women certificate. See "Master of Science in Administration," page 
29, and "Leadership for Women," pages 74-75, for more informa- 
tion and a faculty listing. 



Guide to Course Prefixes 



Because many program descriptions 
refer to courses offered by other depart- 
ments, the following guide to course 
prefixes is provided for both graduate 
and undergraduate classes. 
ACC Accounting 
ADM Administration, Leadership for 

Women 
AER Aerospace Studies 
ANT Anthropology and Sociology 
ARH Art 
ART Art 

ASA American Studies 
ASH History, American Studies 
BEN Applied Music 
BIL Biology 
BIO Biology 

BLA Business Administration 
BRC Applied Music 
BUS Economics 
CBA Applied Music 
CHE Chemistry 
CHO Applied Music 
CLS Comparative Literature Studies, 

English 
COM Communication Studies 
COR Applied Music 
CRJ Criminal Justice 
CRL Chemistry 
CSC Computer Science 
DRC Applied Music 
ECE Early Childhood and Special 

Education 
ECO Economics 
EDA Early Childhood and Special 

Education 
EDC Counseling and Educational 

Psychology 
EDE Elementary Education 
EDF Professional and Secondary 

Education 
EDG Elementary Education 
EDO Professional and Secondary 

Education 
EDP Counseling and Educational 

Psychology 
EDR Literacy 
EDS Professional and Secondary 

Education 
EDU Professional and Secondary 

Education 



EDX Professional and Secondary 

Education 
ELB Applied Music 
ELO AppUed Music 
ENG EngUsh 

ESL Geology and Astronomy 
ESS Geology and Astronomy 
FIN Economics 
FLM EngHsh 
FRE Foreign Languages 
GEO Geography and Planning 
GER Foreign Languages 
GRE Foreign Languages 
HAR Applied Music 
HEA Health 
HEB Foreign Languages 
HIS History 
HON Honors Program 
HTR Health 
HUM Women's Studies 
ICO Applied Music 
IND Geology and Astronomy 
INS Applied Music 
ITA Foreign Languages 
JEN Applied Music 
JRN EngUsh 
KEM Applied Music 
KJL Kinesiology 
IvlN Kinesiology 
LAN Foreign Languages 
LAT Foreign Languages 
LEN English 
LIN Foreign Languages 
LIT English 
LPN Philosophy 
MAB Applied Music 
MAC AppUed Music 
MAK Applied Music 
MAP AppUed Music 
MAS AppUed Music 
MAT Mathematics 
MAW AppUed Music 
MGT Business Administration 
MHL Music History 
MIS Management Information Systems 
MKT Business Administration 
MSI MiUtary Science 
MTC Music Theory/Composition 
MTE Mathematics 
MTL Mathematics 
MUE Music Education 



MWJ Music Theory/Composition 

MWP AppUed Music 

MWS AppUed Music 

NSG Nursing 

NSL Nursing 

ORG AppUed Music 

PAD PoUtical Science 

PEA Physical Education 

PEC AppUed Music 

PEN AppUed Music 

PHE Geology and Astronomy 

PHI Philosophy 

PHL Physics 

PHR Physics 

PHS Physics 

PHY Physics and Pre-Engineering 

PIA AppUed Music 

POR Foreign Languages 

PSC PoUtical Science 

PSY Psychology 

PWP EngUsh 

RES Professional and Secondary 

Education 
RUS Foreign Languages 
SBA AppUed Music 
SCB Biology 
sec Chemistry 
SCE Geology and Astronomy 
SEN AppUed Music 
SOC Anthropology and Sociology 
SPA Foreign Languages 
SPP Communicative Disorders 
SSC Social Studies, Ethnic Studies, 

Peace and Conflict Studies 
STA Mathematics 
STC Applied Music 
SWG Social Work (graduate) 
SWO Social Work 
SYO AppUed Music 
TEC Business Administration 
THA Theatre Arts 
VOC AppUed Music 
vol AppUed Music 
WEN AppUed Music 
WIN Applied Music 
WOS Women's Studies 
WWC Applied Music 



Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

Edward G. Rendell, Governor 

State System of Higher Education 

Judy G. Hamplc, Chancellor 
Board of Governors 



Charles A. Goinulka, Chair Pittsburgh 

Kim E. L)ttle, Via- Chair Pittsburgh 

C.R. "Chucl<" Pennoni, Vice Chair. Bryn Mawr 

Matthew K. Baker Wellsboro 

Frances V. Barnes Harrisburg 

Jude C. Butch Slippery Rock 

Mark E. Collins, Jr Indiana 



Paul S. Ulugolecki Mechanicsburg 

Regina M. Donate Kutztown 

Daniel P. Elby York 

Michael K. Hanna Lock Haven 

David P. Hoiveck Malvern 

Vincent J. Hughes Philadelphia 

Marie Conley Lammando Steelton 



Christine Toretti Olson Indiana 

Edward G. Rendell Harrisburg 

James J. Rhoades Mahanoy City 

David M. Sanko Harrisburg 

John K. Thornburgh Pittsburgh 

F. Eugene Dixon, Jr., Chairman Emeritus 



West Chester University Council of Trustees 



Thomas FiUippo, Chair Malvern 

Bernard J. Carrozza, Vice Chair West Chester 

Jessie Pincus, Secretary West Chester 

Carol Aichele Malvern 

Barry C. Dozer Broomall 

Judy G. Hample, ex-officio Harrisburg 

'tjohanna K. Havlick "William E. Hughes, Sr 



Laurence Harmelin West Chester 

David James West Chester 

Charles J. Liedike West Chester 

Alan P. Novak Coatesvdlle 

Donald Taylor West Grove 

Elinor Z. Taylor West Chester 

•J. Curtis Joyner ']o\\n Unruh 



Board of Directors: The Fund for West Chester University of Pennsylvania 



Christopher Franklin '87, President 
Gail Mackler-Carline 77, Vice 

President 
Emily Jane Lemole, Secretary 
John A. McCarthy, Treasurer 
Thomas A. Fillippo '69, Council of Albert E. Filano 

Trustees Representative John A. Gontarz 



Madeleine Wing Adler 
Keith E. Beale '77 
William H. Boucher '48 
Matthew Bricketto 
MUlie C. Cassidv 



Robert V.A. Harra, Jr 
Maurv Hoberman 
David R Hoiveck '68 
Donald E. Leisey '59 
Jorge A. Leon '81 
Sandra F. Mather '64, M'68 
James E. McErlane 



Ray M. Mincarelli 
Mark P. Mixner 
John N. Nickolas '90 
Mark G. Pavlovich, Interim 

Executive Director 
Darla Pemerey 
Carlos Ziegler 



Board of Directors: West Chester University Foundation 



John J. Ciccarone, President 

W.E. Mullestein, Vice President 

David L. Peirce, Executive Director and Treasurer 

William H. Boucher '48 



Albert E. Filane 
Mrs. John B. Hannum 
Eleanor Latta 
Emily Jane Lemole 



Leslie B. Schramm 
Elinor Z. Taylor '43 



WCU Alumni Association Board of Directors 



Rose Passero Conley 
Stanley Cramer (faculty liaison) 
J. Glenn Crawford 
Carmen Evans Culp 
Arthur DiGiuseppe 
Debra Dreisbach 
Sara Eastwick 
Corinne Green 
■Janice Weir Etshied 



Richard Guinan 

Judith A. Jarrett 

Carolyn Keefe (Parliamentarian) 

Thomas Kent 

Joseph F. Kienle III 

L.James Kiscaden 

Donald A. Lewis 

Nancy Ambrosia MacMullan 

•Karl HeUcher 



*John F. Murphy 



* Emeritus or Emerita 
tDeceased 



Lynn McDowell 

Anne Sourbeer Morris 

C. Curtis Norcini 

Connie Ott (Executive Director, 

WCU Alumni Association) 
Douglas Owens 
Nick D. Polcini 
Ann Giangiulie Rilatt 
'Herbert Lee 

'Luther B. Sowers 



Christopher P. Schrode 

Luther B. Sowers 

John Stoddart 

Elinor Z. Taylor (Council of 

Trustees liaison) 
Garrick Weaver 
Terry Weyant 

•Richard Merion 



West Chester University is a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education. 



Administration 



President Dr. Madeleine Wing Adler 

Elxecutive Deputy to the President Mr. Lawrence A. Dowdy 

Director, Social Equit)- Mrs. Richeleen Dashield 

Vice President for Academic Affairs/Provost Dr. Linda L. Lamwers 

Associate Provost Dr. Sheila Patterson 

Associate Vice President for Sponsored Research Dr. George Hong 

and Facult)' Development 

Dean, College of" Arts and Sciences Dr. Charles D. Hurt 

Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences Dr. Jennie Skerl 

Dean, College of Business Dr. Christopher M. Fiorentino 

and Public AfTairs 

Dean, College of Education Dr. Tony W. Johnson 

Associate Dean, College of Education Dr. Joseph Malak 

Dean, College of Health Sciences Dr. Donald E. Barr 

Dean, College of Visual and Performing Arts Dr. Timothy V. Blair 

Dean, Graduate Studies and Extended Education ... Dr. Cher)'l M. Vermey 

Dean, Undergraduate Studies and Student Support Dr. Quincy Moore 

Director, Academic Advising Center Mr. Herb Lee 

Director, Academic Development Program Dr. Peter Kv-per 

Director, Admissions Ms. Marsha L. Haug 

Director, Business Technology Center Dr. Thomas A. Egan 

Director, Financial Aid Mr. Dana C. Parker 

Director, Library Services Mr. Richard Swain 

Director, Teacher Education Center Dr John Hartman 

Registrar Mr. Joseph Santivasci 

Vice President for Administrative and Fiscal Affairs. . . Mr. Mark P. Mixner 

Associate Vice President for Human Mr. Michael T. Maloy 

Resource Services 

Associate Vice President for Facilities Mr. William E. Bennett 

Director, Budget Ms. Linda Boucher 

Director, Custodial and Transportation Services Mr. Royston Gathings 

Director, Environmental Health and Safety Ms. Gail Fellows 

Director, Facilities Management Mr Greg Cuprak 

Director, Facilities Design and Construction Ms. Dee Giardina 

Director, Facilities Planning Mr. Thomas Clark 

Director, Financial Reporting Ms. Maureen Sandusk)' 

Director, Fiscal Affairs Ms. Amy W. Boland 

Manager, Grounds and Support Services Mr Dennis Kr)S7.an 

Director, Public Safet)' Mr Michael D. Bicking 

Director, Purchasing and Contracts Ms. Marianne Peffall 

Director, Space Management and Calendar. . . . Mrs. Barbara (Babs) Winicur 

Bursar (Director, Student Financial Services) Mr. Daniel Pauletti 

Internal Review Mr Mark P. Mixncr 

Manager, Contracts and Grants Business Mr Robert Halon 



Vice President for Advancement Dr Mark G. Pavlovich 

Associate Vice President for Advancement Vacant 

Director, .^umni Relations Ms. Connie Ott 

Director, Annual Giving and Corporate Relations Ms. Melissa Cauler 

Director, Cultural and Community Affairs Mr. John Rhein 

Director, Major Gifts and Foundation Relations Mr Douglas Kleintop 

Director, Planned Giving Ms. Norma Clayton 

Director, Public Relations and Marketing (Interim). . Ms. Loretta MacAlpine 

Director, Publications and Printing Services Ms. CjTithia A. Bednar 

Manager, Graphics and Printing Mr. Robert McGuckin 

Vice President for Information Services Dr. J. Fred Gage 

Executive Director, Academic Computing Services Mr Adel Barimani 

Director, Administrative Computing Ms. Carol Clark 

Director, Networking, Telecommunications, Mr Steve Laverty 

and Operations (Interim) 

Vice President for Student Affairs Dr Matthew Bricketto 

and Dean of Students 

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Ms. Diane DeVestem 

Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Dr Thomas Puree 

Assistant Dean of Students Ms. Mary Ann Hammond 

Assistant Dean for Student Development Ms. Mary- Alice Ozechoski 

and Involvement 
Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs .... Ms. Jacqueline Hodes 

Director, Athletics Dr Exlward Matejkovic 

Director, Career Development Center Ms. Elizabeth Giangiulio 

Director, Children's Center Ms. Sandra Jones 

Director, Counseling and Psychological Dr Judith Baron 

Services Department 

Director, Greek Life and Student Organizations Mr Charles Warner 

Director, Housing Services Mr Peter Galloway 

Director, Judicial Affairs and Student Assistance. . . . Ms. Lynn Klingensmith 

Director, Multicultural Affairs Mr Jerome Hutson 

Director, Recreation and Leisure Programs Dr Stephen Gambino 

Director, Residence Life Ms. Marion McKinney 

Director, Service Learning and Volunteer Programs .... Mrs. Margaret Tripp 

Director, Sykes Union Mr David Timmann 

Director, Women's Center Ms. Robin Garrett 

Student Services Incorporated, Ms. Mell Josephs 

Executive Director 

Student Services Incorporated, Bookstore Manager Mr Terry Shira 

Student Services Incorporated, Coordinator, Mr Stephen McKieman 

Co-Currlcular Programs 
Student Services Incorporated, Program Coordinator Mr. Jeff Gerstein 

for Campus Activities 



Faculty 

Spring 2005 



MAD1:LEIN1-: VVINC; AIJLLR (I992) President 
B.A.. Northwestern University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin 

UNDA L. LANfWERS (1995) V^ict President for 
Academic Affairs/ProvosI 
B.A., Douglass College; M.S., Ph.D., Rutgers 
I Iniversity 

J. FRED GAGK (2000) Vice President for 
Information Services 

BiS.Ed., West Virginia Universit>", M.Ed., Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh 

MARK P MIXNER (2002) Vice President for 
Administrative and Fiscal Affairs 
B.A., College of William and Marj-; M.S.A., 
George Washington University' 

MA'rrHEWJ. BRICKETTO (1986) Vice 
President for Student Affairs 
B.S., Scton Hall University; M.Ed., Ohio 
University; M.B.A., Fairleigh Dickinson 
University; Ed.D., Rutgers University 



MARK G. I'AVLOVICH (2000) Vice President 
for Advancement 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

CHARLES D. HURT (2002) Dean, College of 

Arts and Sciences 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.S., University of 

Kentucky; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin - 

Madison 

CHRISTOPHER M. FIORENTINO (1985) 
Dean, College of Business and Public Affairs 
B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Temple University 

TONY W.JOHNSON (1997) Dean, College of 

Education 

B.A. Western Carolina University; M.A., Ph.D., 

George Peabody College for Teachers 

DONALD E. BARR (1997) Dean, College of 
Health Sciences 

B.S., Colorado State University; Ed.M, Ph.D., 
State University of New York at Buffalo 



TIMOTHY V. BLAJR (1992) Dean. College of 
Visual and Perform ing Arts 

B.Mus., Susquehanna University; M.M.,The New 
England Consen'atory of Music; D.M.A., 
Catholic University of America 

CHERYL M. VERMEY (2002) Dean, Graduate 
Studies and Extended Education 
B.S., Millersville University; Ed.M., Ed.D., 
Temple University 

QUINCY MOORE (2001) Dean, Undergraduate 
Studies and Student Support 
B.A., Colver-Stockton College; M.S., University 
of Nevada; Ph.D., University of Iowa 

SHEILA PATTERSON (1992) Associate Provost 
B.S., Mankato State; M.S., Ph.D., Southern 
Illinois University 



ANN A. ABBOTT (2001) Chairperson, 
Department of Graduate Social Work; Professor 
B.S., St. Norbcrt College; M.S.S., Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College 

THONL\S J. AHLBORN (1967) Associate 
Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., California University; M.A., Kent State 
University; M.S., University of Delaware 

NASEER AHMAD (1987) Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 

B.S., M.S.. Ph.D., D.Sc, Aligarh MusUm 

Universit)' 

SYLVIA MOSS AHRAMJIAN {\976) Associate 
Professor of Applied Music 

B.Mus., Juilliard School of Music; M.M., Indiana 
Universit)', Bloomington 

KRISTEN ALBERT (2001) Chairperson, 
Department of Music Education, Assistant Professor 
B.S., Millersville Univcrsir\", M.Ed., Shippensburg 
University 

NANCY ALLEN (2002) Director, Pre-Major 
Advising, Assistant Professor of Educational Services 
B.A., Buckncll University; M.A., Duqucsne 
University'; Ph.D., New York University 

KATHR'HTSI ALESSANDRIA (2003) Assistant 
Professor of Counseling and Educational Psychology 
B.S., M.A., James Madison University; Ph.D., 
University of Virginia 

THO^L\S ANDREWS (1997) Associate Professor 
of Economics 

B.S., West Chester University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Temple University' 

PAUL M. ARSENAULT (1998) Associate 
Professor of Marketing 

M.S., Marietta College; M.B.A., Wake Forest 
University; Ph.D., Temple University 



HANNAH ASHLEY (2001) Assistant Professor of 

English 

B.S., Cornell University; M.Ed., Ph.D., Temple 

Universit)' 

CHRISTIAN K. AWUYAH (1989) Associate 
Professor of English 

B.A., University of Ghana; M.A., University of 
Guelph; Ph.D., University of Alberta 

MAHRUKH AZAM (2004) Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry 

B.S., Punjab University; M.S., Quaid-e-Azam 

University; M.S., Ph.D., Seton Hall University 

JULL\N AZORLOSA (2001) Assistant Professor 

of Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Delaware 

JENNIFER S. BACON (2000) Assistant 
Chairperson, Department of English; Assistant Professor 
B.A., University of South Carolina; M.A., 
Universit)' of Cincinnati; Ph.D., Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute 

JOHN H. BAKER (1974) Chairperson, 
Department of Art; Professor 

B.A., West Chester University; M.F.A., University 
of Delaware 

LYNDA A. BALOCHE (1989) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of Elementary Education; 

Professor 

B.A., Trenton State College; Ed.D., Temple 

University 

SCOTT BALTHAZAR (1991) Professor of Music 
History and Literature 

B.A., Amherst College; Mj\., Ph.D., University 
of Pennsylvania 

JUDITH BARON (1974) Chairperson and 
Psychologist, Counseling Center; Professor 
B.A., M.A., University of Michigan; Ph.D., York 
University, Toronto 



ROGER BARTH (\9ZS) Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 

B.A., La Salle University; M.A., Ph.D., Johns 

Hopkins University 

CHARLES R. BAUERLEIN (1988) Assistant 
Professor of English 

B.A., Loyola University of the South; M.A., 
Pennsylvania State University 

NADINE M. BEAN (1998) Assistant Professor of 

Graduate Social Work 

B.A., M.S.S.A., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve 

University 

TERENCE BEATTIE (20O4) Instructor of 

Athletia 

B.A., Alfred Universit)'; M.A., Canisium College 

ROBERT M. BEDFORD (1966) Professor of 
Applied Music 

B.Mus., M.S., The Juilliard School; D.M.A.. 
Catholic University of America 

DENA G. BEEGHLY (1992) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of Literacy; Associate 

Professor 

B.S., Southern Connecticut State University; 

M.Ed., Ed.D., Universit)' of Georgia 

SHARON BEGAN (1992) Assistant Chairperson, 
Department of Biology; Professor 
B.S., Kutztown Universit)-; M.S., East Tennessee 
State University; Ph.D., Southern Illinois 
University at Carbondale 

MICHAEL BELL (2001) Assistant Professor of 

Early Childhood and Special Education 

B.A., Arizona State Universit)-; M.A., Northern 

Arizona University; Ph.D., University of Texas at 

Austin 



Faculty 



JOHN T. BENESKJ (1986) Professor of Bwlogj, 
A.A., Southwestern College; B.A., M.A., 
Humboldt State University; Ph.D., Washington i 
State Univcrsit)' 

CYNTHIA D. BENZING (1988) Professor of 
Economics anti Finance 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.B.A., 
Ph.D., Drcxel University 

HELEN A. BERGER (1991) Professor of Socio/ogy 
B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Sussex University 
(England); Ph.D., New York Universit)' 

JAY H. BERKOWITZ (1969) Chairperson. 
Department of Theatre and Dance; Associate Professor 
B.S., M.A., Temple University 

R. LORRAINE BERNOTSKY {1996) dissociate 
Professor of Political Science 
B.A., Messiah College; M.A., Temple University; 
D.Phil., University of Oxford 

DEBORAH BIERSCHWALE (\999) Assistant 
Professor of Counseling and Psychological Services 
B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Psy.D., 
Widener University 

DEBRA BILL (1998) Associate Professor of Health 
B.A., Central Connecticut State University; 
M.RH., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., 
Temple University 

RICHARD E. BLAKE (1975) Professor of Art 
B.F.A., Tyler School of Art of Temple University 

JAMES R. BLEIBERG (2002) Assistant Professor 
of Counseling 

B.A., Haverford College; M.Ed., Harvard 
University; M.A., Hebrew Union College; Ph.D., 
Widener University 

ARVIDJ. BLOOM (1988) Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Weslcyan University; M.S., Ph.D., Colorado 
State University 

MARJTA R. BOES (1991) Associate Professor of 

History 

B.A., M.A., Hunter College; Ph.D., City 

University of New York 

GAIL G. K. BOLLIN (1990) Professor of 
Elementary Education 

B.A., St. Bonaventure University; M.A., Purdue 
University; Ph.D., University of Delaware 

DAVID L. BOLTON (\99-[) Assistant Professor of 

Professional and Secondary Education 

B.A., Seminar Marionhoehe (Germany); M.A., 

Andrews Universit)'; Ph.D., Florida State 

University 

DEANNE L. ZOTTER BONIFAZl (1991) 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Bloomsburg University; M.A., Ph.D., Kent 
State University 

ROGER E. BOVE (\9M) Associate Professor of 

Economics and Finance 

B.A., Harvard College; M.A., Ph.D.. Harvard 

University 

JENNIFER BRADLEY (2004) Assistant Professor 
of Early Childhood and Special Education 
B.A., M.Ed., Loyola CoUege 

ERMINIO BRAIDOTTI (1978) Professor of 

Foreign Languages 

B.A., Youngstown State University; M.A., 

Middlebury College; Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 



RICHARD G. BRANTON (1962) Chairperson, 
Department of Mathematics; Professor 
B.S., West Chester University; M.S., University of 
Delaware; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

JAMES W. BRENNER (2004) Assistant Professor 

ofHealth 

B.S., West Chester University; M.Ed., College of 

New Jersey; Ph.D., Temple University 

MARY R BREWSTER (1993) Professor of 
Criminal Justice 

B.A., St. Joseph's College; M.A., Fordham 
Universit)'; Ph.D., Rutgers University 

PATRICL^ BRODERICK (1995) Associate 
Professor of Counseling and Educational Psychology 
B.A., Alvernia College; M.A., Villanova 
University; Ph.D., Temple University 

STEVEN L. BROITMAN {\9S7) Associate 

Professor of Biology 

B.S., State University of New York at Stony 
Brook; M.Ed., University of Massachusetts; M.A., 
Ph.D., Princeton Universit)' 

MICHAEL W. BROOKS (1971) Professor of 

English 

B.A., Antioch College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Toronto 

DEBORAH S. BROWN (1992) Professor of 
Counseling and Educational Psychology 
B.S., West Chester University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Delaware 

DAVID F. BROWN (1991) Professor of 
Elementary Education 

B.S., M.S., Northern Illinois University; Ed.D., 
Universit)' of Tennessee 

KIMBERLEE S. BROVW (1993) Associate 
Professor of Professional and Secondary Education 
B.Ed., Temple University; M.Ed., West Chester 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

TIMOTHY J. BROWN (2002) Associate Professor 

of Communication Studies 

B.A., M.A., West Chester University; Ph.D., 

Ohio State University 

MARY BUCKELEW (1999) Associate Professor of 

English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of New Mexico 

EMILY BULLOCK (2004) Assistant Professor of 
Applied Music 

B.M., University of Colorado; M.M., University 
of Tulsa; D.M.A., University of Colorado 

SEETHA BURTNER (2002) Assistant Professor 
of Philosophy 

B.A., St. Xavier CoUege; M.S., Ohio State 
University; M.A., Colorado State University; 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

J. BRYAN BURTON (1991) Professor of Music 

Education 

B.M., West Texas State University; M.A., Western 

State College of Colorado; D.M.E., University of 

Southern Mississippi 

JEAN PIPER BURTON (\992) Associate 
Professor of Library Services 
B.S., Valley City State University; M.L.S., 
Vanderbilt University; M.A., Widener University 

RICHARD M. BUSCH (1990) Professor of 

Geology 

A.B., Franklin and Marshall College; M.A., 

Temple University; Ph.D., University of 

Pittsburgh 



ROULKl L. UYTNAR (1975) Professor of 

Theatre 

B.S.Ed., CaUfornia University; M.A., West 

Virginia University; M.F.A., University of 

Pittsburgh 

ALBERT CAFFO (1999) Co-director, 
Pharmaceutical Product Development Program; 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., Penns)'lvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Ohio State University 

WEI WEI CAI (1996) Associate Professor of 
Elementary Education 
B.A., Beijing Teachers College; M.A., 
Bloomsburg University; Ed.D., Indiana University 
of Pennsylvania 

AMANDA CAIN (2002) Assistant Professor of 

Library - Cataloging 

B.A., Evergreen State College; M.L.S., University 

ofWashington 

GERARD A. CALLANAN (2001) Associate 
Professor of Management 
B.A., Temple University; M.B.A., LaSalle 
University; Ph.D., Drexel University 

SUSAN F CAROFF (1995) Associate Professor of 

Literacy 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.Ed., The 

Citadel; Ph.D., Purdue University 

LYNN CARSON {\99\) Associate Professor of 

Health 

B.A., Neumann College; M.S., St. Josephs 

University; Ph.D., Temple University 

LOUIS A. CASCIATO (1963) Associate Professor 

of Earth Sciences 

B.S., St. Joseph's College (Pa.); M.S., Vdlanova 

Universit)' 

GIOVANNI CASOTTI (1996) Associate Professor 

of Biology 

B.A., Ph.D., Murdoch University (Australia) 

KATHRYN S. CHILCOTE (1989) Associate 
Professor of Applied Music 
B.A., M.M., University of the Pacific; D.M.A., 
University of Oregon 

PAUL F. CHRIST (1994) Director. M.B^. 

Program; Associate Professor of Marketing 

B.B.A., M.B.A.; Temple University; Ph.D., Drexel 

University 

HUNG M. CHU (1976) Professor of Management 
B.S., St. Joseph's College (Ind.); M.B.A., 
Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., Louisiana 
State University 

MELISSA CICHOWICZ (1986) Director, Pre- 
Medical Program: Associate Professor of Chemistry 
B.S., St. Joseph's College; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland 

BETHANN CINELLI (1987) Assistant 
Chairperson, Department ofHealth; Professor 
B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., 
Temple University; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State 
Univcrsirv 

BARBARA CLEGHORN (1999) Assistant 

Professor of Kinesiology 

B.S., West Chester University; M.S., Drexel 

University 

FRANCES E. CLELAND (1994) Assistant 
Chairperson. Department of Kinesiology; Professor 
B.S., Purdue University; M.S., P.K.I)., Indiana 
University 



h'aculn' 



DARLA SPENCE COFFEY (1998) Chairperson, 
Department of Social Work; /Issociale Professor 
B.S.W., Eastern College; M.S.W., University of 
Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Bryn Mawr College 

JUANITA RODGERS COMFORT (2001) 
Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., M.A., Old Dominion University; Ph.D., 
Ohio State University 

KATIIERINE A. CONROY (1983) Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Rutgers -The State University; M.S., 
Boston University 

IDNA CORBETT (1992) Director, LARC; 
Professor of Educational Services 
B.A., Goshen College; M.A., Michigan State 
University; Ed. D., Temple University 

STANLEY]. CRAMER {2000) Assistant Professor 
of Kinesiology 

B.S., M.S., West Chester Univcrsit)-, Ph.D., 
Temple University 

CARL CRANMER (2000) Assistant Professor of 
Applied Music 

B.Mus., Oberlin Conservatory of Music; M.M., 
D.M.A., The JuiUiard School 

WALTER L. CRESSLER III (2001) Assistant 
Professor of Library References 
B.A., Dartmouth'CoUcgc; M.S., Drcxel 
University; M.Ed., Widcner University; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

W. STEPHEN CRODDY (1969) Professor of 

Philosophy 

B.A., University of Southern California; M.A., 

Temple University'; Ph.D., Brown University 

DAVID CULLEN (1993) Instructor of 

Instrumental Music 

B.M., Hartford School of Music 

JUDITH A. CURTIN (2001) Instructor of 

Communicative Disorders 

B.S., M.S., Marquette University 

NEIL CURTIS (1993) Associate Professor of Sports 

Medicine 

B.S., Boston University; M.S., University of 

Arizona; Ed.M., Ed.D., Columbia University 

VIRGINIA M. DA COSTA {\9n) Associate 
Professor of Art 

B.A., State University of New York at Albany; 
M.A., California State University at Long Beach; 
Ph.D., Universit)' of California, Santa Barbara 

DANIEL DARICAN (1992) Professor of Literacy 
B.S., M.S., Northern Illinois University; Ph.D., 
Universit)- of Oregon 

LAWRENCE R. DAVIDSON (1989) Professor of 

History 

B.A., Rutgers -The State University; M.A., 

Gcorgeto\vn University; Ph.D.. University of 

Alberta 

KEVIN W. DEAN (1991) Director. Honors 
Program; Professor of Communication Studies 
B.S., Bowling Green University; M.A., Miami 
Universit)' of Ohio; Ph.D., University of 
Maryland 

ELI DEHOPE Q.QtO\) Associate Professor of Social 

Work 

B.S.W., Temple Universin'; M.Ed., West Chester 

University; M.A., Ph.D.. University of 

Pennsylvania 



CHERYL B. DELUCA (2000) Assistant Professor 
of Early Childhood and Special Education 
B.A., M.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Buffalo 

PHILIP M. DeMOSS (1972) Professor of 

Economics and Finance 

B.A., Park College; M.A., Ph.D., Kansas State 

University 

DAVID R DeVENNEY (1996) Associate Professor 
of Applied Music 

B.M., Iowa State Universit)'; M.M., Univcrsirv' of 
Wisconsin-Madison; D.M.A., Conservatory of 
Music, University of Cincinnati 

KATHLEEN DEVLIN-KELLY i\97b) Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N., Georgetown University; M.S.N., Boston 

University 

CONNIE DILUCCHIO (2003) Assistant 
Chairperson, Department of Elementary Education: 
Assistant Professor 

B.S., M.E., Pennsylvania State University; Ed.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

ANDREW E. DINNIMAN (1972) Professor of 
Educational Services 

B.A., Universit)' of Connecticut; M.A., University 
of Maryland; Ed.D., Pennsylvania State University 

W. LARRY DORMINY (1972) Associate Professor 
of Applied Music 

B.Mus., Jacksonville University; M.M., Florida 
State University; D.M., Indiana Universit)' 

GEORGE PULLMAN DRAKE, JR. (1994) 

Associate Professor of Early Childhood and Special 

Education 

B.S., West Virginia University; M.Ed., Trenton 

State College; Ph.D., University of Virginia 

MARTHA DROBNAK (1992) Chairperson, 
Department of Elementary Education; Professor 
B.A., Grove City College; M.Ed., University of 
Pittsburgh; Ed.D., Nova Universit)' 

PHILLIP K. DUNCAN (1983) Chairperson, 
Department of Psychology; Professor 
B.A., Wittenberg University; M.A., Western 
Michigan Universit)'; Ph.D., Universit)- of Florida 

KEVIN C. DUNLEAVY (1979) Chairperson, 

Department of Economics and Finance; jissistant 

Professor 

B.A., University of Delaware; Ph.D., Duke 

University 

T. OBINKARAM ECHEWA (1986) Professor of 

English 

B.S., Universit)' of Notre Dame; M.S., Columbia 

University; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; 

Ph.D., Syracuse University 

HOWARD EDELMAN (\9n) Assistant 
Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., Cit)' University of New Yorl^ M.S., 
Universit)' of Delaware 

THONL\S EGAN (1968) Director, Center for the 
Study of Connectivity and Databases; Professor of 
Educational Services 

B.S., M.Ed., West Chester Universit)-; Ed.D., 
Universit)' of Pennsylvania 

LINDA ELLO (Xt')^) Assistant Professor of 

Graduate Social Work 

B.A., Pennsylvania State Universit)'; M.S., 

Universit)' of Iowa; Ph.D., Rutgers -The State 

Universir\' 



PAUL R. EMMONS (mS) Associate Professor of 
Library Services 

B. Mus,, Lawrence University of Wisconsin; 
M.M., M.S., University of Illinois 

RICHARD G. EPSTEIN (1991) Professor of 

Computer Science 

B.A., George Wa.shington University; M.S.E., 

University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Temple 

Universit)' 

MARGARET ERVIN (2003) Assistant Professor 
of English 

B.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., University at 
Albany, State University of New York 

CELIA ESPLUGAS (1990) Assistant Chairperson. 
Department of Foreign Languages; Professor 
B. A., Teacher's College, Argentina; M.Ed., 
Bowling Green State Universit)-; Ph.D., 
University of Toledo 

JAMES D. FABREY (1975) Chairperson, 
Department of Computer Science; Professor 
A.B., CorncU University; Ph.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

G. WINFIELD FAIRCHILD (1983) Professor of 

Biology 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., University 

of Michigan 

JAMES S. FALCONE (1991) Chairperson, 
Department of Chemistry; Assistant Professor 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University 
of Delaware 

GEORGE FASIC (\n%) Assistant Professor of 
Geography and Planning 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., 
Columbia University 

JUDITH S. nNKEL (1968) Chairperson, 
Department of Early Childhood and Special 
Education; Professor 

B.S., Temple University; M.ExI., West Chester 
Universit)'; Ph.D., Union Graduate School 

FRANK E. FISH (1980) Professor of Biology 
B.A., State Universit)' of New York at Oswego; 
M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State Universit)' 

CYNTHIA G. nSHER (2000) Associate Professor 
of Geology and Astronomy 
B.A., Augustana CoUegc; M.B.Sc, Ph.D., 
Universit)' of Colorado 

ANDREA R. FISHALAN (1990) Professor of 
English; Director, Pennsylvania Writing and 
Literature Projects 

B.A., Dickinson College; M.Ed., Shippensburg 
University; Ph.D., Universit)' of Pennsylvania 

KAREN L. nrrS (2OOO) Assistant Professor of 

English 

B.A., M.E., Northwestern State University; 

Ph.D., Texas Christian Universit)' 

KEVIN FLANIGAN (2O03) Assistant Professor of 

Literacy 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.E., James 

Madison Universit)-; M.E., Ph.D., University of 

Virginia 

ROBERT R FLETCHER (1992) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of English; Associate 

Professor 

B.A., University of California; M.A., Ph.D., 

University ot California, Los Angeles 

KEVIN E. FLYNN {199S) Assistant Professor of 

Accounting 

M.S., Drexel University 



ANITA K. FOEMAN (1991) Profeuorof 

Communication StuMes 

B.H.. Defiance CoUcge; M.A., Ph.D.. Temple 

University 

CLAUDE R. FOSTER, JR. (1967) Professor of 

History 

B.A., Eastern CoUege; B.D.,The Reformed 

Episcopal Seminary; M.A., University of 

Delaware; Th.M., Crozer Theological Seminar)'; 

Zeugnis ftier Deutsche Sprache und Kultur, 

Universit>' of Freiburg; Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 

SANDRA FOWKES-GODEK (\<)<)\) Associate 
Professor of Sports Medicine 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., 
University of Colorado; Ph.D., Temple University 

BONITA FREEMAN -WITTHOFT (1974) 
Director, Ethnic Studies Institute; Associate Professor 
of Anthropology 

B.A., University of Maine; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

RAYMOND FRIDAY (1969) Professor of Applied 

Music 

B.S., West Chester University; M.Mus., Oberlin 

College; Diploma, Academy of Vocal Arts; Ph.D., 

New York University 

JONATHAN FRIEDMAN (2002) Director. 
Holocaust and Genocide Studies Program; Associate 
Professor of History 

B.A., Kent State University; M.A.. Ph.D., 
University of Maryland - College Park 

BLAISE R FROST (1989) Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 

B.A., Yankton College; M.S., Ph.D., University of 

South Dakota 

FRANK F FRY, JR. (1993) Professor of 

Kinesiology 

B.S., West Chester University; M.E^., Colorado 

State University; D.PE., Springfield College 

JOHN A. GAARDER (1999) Instructor of Applied 

Music 

B.M., Universit)' of Wisconsin - Madison; M.M., 

New England Conservatory of Music 

ANGELO R GADALETO (1986) Professor, 
Counseling and Educational Psychology 
B.A., Rider College; M.Ed., University of 
Delaware; Ph.D., University of Virginia 

MARC GAGNE (1999) Assistant Professor of 

Geology 

B.S., University of Montreal; Ph.D., University of 

Georgia 

GLORIA GALANTE (1993) Instructor of 

Applied Music 

B.S., West Chester University 

CLYDEJ.GALBRAITH (1974) Chairperson, 
Department of Accounting; Assistant Professor 
B.S., M.B.A., Drexel University; C.RA., 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania 

GAIL M. GALLITANO (1992) Professor of 

Mathematics 

B.S., Monmouth College; M.S., Farleigh 

Dickinson University; M.A., M.Ed., Ed.D., 

Columbia University 

ROBERT J. GALLOP (2001) Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Drexel University 



SUSAN GANS (1997) Associate Professor of 

Psychology 

B.A., New York University; M.A.. Ph.D., 

University of Chicago 

CONSTANCE GARCIA-BARRIO (1990) 
Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., West Chester University; M.A., Temple 
Universit)'; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

EMILIA GAROFALO (2002) Assistant Professor 

of Foreign Languages 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

ROBIN GARRETT (1978) Director. Women's 
Center; Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N. , Case Western Reserve University; M.S.N. , 
University of Pennsylvania 

CLAYTON GARTHWAIT (2004) Assistant 

Professor of Library Services 

B.A., Universit)' of Delaware; M.S., Drexel 

University 

JOHN GAULT (1991) Associate Professor of 

Marketing 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.B.A., University of 

Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Drexel University 

KARIN E. GEDGE (1997) Associate Professor of 

History 

B.A., Lake Forest College; M.A., State University 

of New York at Brockport; Ph.D., Yale University 

ELIZABETH A. GTANGIULIO (1972) 
Director, Career Development Center; Associate 
Professor of Educational Services 
B.S., West Chester University; M.Ed., University 
of Arizona 

JAMES THOMAS GILL (1995) Professor of 

Literacy 

B.A., Randolph Macon College; M.Ed., Ed.D., 

Universit)' of Virginia 

PETER L. GLIDDEN (1995) Associate Professor 

of Mathematics 

B.A., College of Wooster; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

University 

JOSEPH J. GODEK 111 (1972) Professor of Sports 

Medicine 

B.S., Universit)' of Delaware; M.S., West Chester 

University 

DENNIS GODFREY (1987) Associate Professor of 

English 

B.A., University of Northern Iowa; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Michigan 

STEVEN C. GOOD (1996) Associate Professor of 

Geology 

B.A., Augustana College; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of Colorado 

FELIX E. GOODSON (1998) Associate Professor 
of Chemistry 

A.B., Princeton University; Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

MARLENE GOSS (1999) Associate Professor of 

Professional and Secondary Education 

B.A., M.Ed., Temple University; Ph.D., Walden 

University 

HENRY GRABB (1992) Professor of Applied 

Music 

B.A., University of Central Florida; M.M., 
Northwestern University of Illinois; D.M., Florida 
State University 

CHARLES W. GRASSEL (1968) Associate 

Professor of Geography 

B.S., West Chester University; M.S., Universit)' of 

Pennsylvania 



PAUL D. GREEN (1971) Professor of English 
A.B., Temple University; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 
Universit)' 

JUDITH J. GREENAMYER (1988) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of Biology; Assistant 

Professor 

M.S., University of California; D.V.M., Ohio 

State University 

ANITA GREENLEE (2001) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of Applied Music; Assistant 

Professor 

B.S., M.S.,Juilliard School of Music 

SCOTT C. GREENWOOD (2(X)\) Assistant 

Professor of Literacy 

B.A., M.Ed., Westminster College; Ed.D., Lehigh 

Universit)' 

HARVEY C. GREISMAN (1979) Professor of 

Sociology 

B.A., State University of New York at New Paltz; 

M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 

SHIRLEY R. GRICE (1972) Assistant Professor of 
Educational Services 

B.S., M.Ed., West Chester University; Ed.D., 
Temple University 

SANDRA GROSS (1997) Associate Professor of 

Health 

B.S., M.S., North Dakota State University; Ph.D., 

Kansas State University 

FRANK GROSSHANS (1975) Professor of 

Mathematia 

B.S., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Universit)' of 

Chicago 

CHARLES E. GROVE (1999) Associate Professor 
of Foreign Languages 

B.S., SUpper)' Rock University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Universit)' of Pittsburgh 

CHERYL GUNTER (1999) Professor of 
Communicative Disorders 

B.A., University of Tennessee; M.A., Memphis 
State; Ph.D., University of Texas - Austin 

SHIV K. GUPTA (1985) Associate Professor of 

Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Delhi University; M.S., University of 

Wisconsin; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve 

Universit)' 

WILLIAM I. GUY (1974) Instructor of 
Educational Services 
A.B., Temple University 

.PATRICIA L. GYSLING (1998) Instructor of 

Mathematics 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., 

University ot Michigan 

SUSAN STABLER HAAS (2002) Instructor of 

Nursing 

B.S.N., M.S.N. , Villanova University 

CYNTHIA S. HAGGARD (1990) Associate 
Professor of Professional and Secondary Education 
B.A., M.A., Ed. D., Indiana University 

WAYNE HANLRY (2000) Assistant Professor of 

History 

B.A., M.A., Central Missouri State University; 

Ph.D., University of Missouri 

CHRIS L. HANNING (\99S) Associate Professor 

of Applied Music 

B.A., B.A., University of South Florida; M.M., 

University of Akron; D.M.A., University of 

Colorado 




JOHN H. HANSON (2000) Assistant Proftssor of 

English 

B.A., University of'Libtria; M.A., Syracuse 

University, I'h.D., Florida State University 

CHARLES A. HARDY III (1990) Professor of 

History 

B.A.,M.A., Ph. n, Temple University 

JEFFREY E. HARRIS (\<)ii) Associate Professor 
of Health 

B.A., University ot" California, San Diego; 
D.H.Sc, M.P.H., Loma Linda University 

YOKO HASHIMOTO-SINCLAIR (1969) 
Professor of Theatre 

B.A., M.A., Aoyama Gakuin University (Japan); 
M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 

SCOrr HEINERICHS (2004) Instructor of 
Sports Medicine 

B.S., West Chester University; M.A.T., University 
of South Carolina 

JOHN G. HELION (\990) Associate Professor of 

Kinesiology 

B.S., State Universit)' of New York; M.A., Ed.M., 

Ed.D., Columbia University 

DANA HENNING (2004) Assistant Professor of 
Early Childhood and Special Education 
B.S., University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee, 
Ed.M., Ed.D, Temple University 

ANNE F. HERZOG (1992,) Associate Professor of 

English 

B.A., College of Holy Cross; M.A., Georgetown 

University; Ph.D., Rutgers -The State University 

THOMAS J. HESTON (1975) Professor of 

History; 

A.B., Gettysburg College; M.A., Ph.D., Case 

Western Reserve University 

WILLIAM L. HEWITT (1992) Professor of 

History 

B.A., M.A., Adams State CoUcge; Ph.D., 

University of Wyoming 

JANET S. HICKMAN (1992) Professor of 

Nursing 

B.S.N. , University of Bridgeport; M.S.N., 

Northern Illinois University; Ed.D., Temple 

University 

MARK HICKMAN (1998) Assistant Professor of 
Communication Studies 
B.A., Marshall University; M.A., Miami 
University of Ohio 

CAROL J. HICKS (1999) Assistant Professor of 

Social Work 

B.A., Lincoln University; M.S.W., Smith College 

ALLAN B. HILL (1997) Associate Professor of 
Educational Services 

B.A., M.A., Temple University; Ed.D., The 
Fielding Institute 

MARGARET SCHIFF HILL (1990) Assistant 

Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Kutztown University; M.F.A., S)Tacuse 

University 

JOBY HILLIKER (2004) Assistant Professor of 

Geology and Astronomy 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

STEPHANIE L. HINSON (\992) Assistant 
Chairperson, Department of Counseling and 
Educational Psychology; Associate Professor 
A.B., Princeton Universit)'; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University' of Virginia 



FRANK HOFFMAN (\990) Associate Professor of 

Philosophy 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., University of 

Hawaii; Ph.D., University of London 

JOHN HOLINGJAK,JR. (1965) Associate 
Professor of Professional and Secondary Education 
B.S., Kutztown University; Ed.M., Temple 

University 

BELLE HOLLON (1987) Associate Professor of Art 
B.RA., Philadelphia College of Art; M.RA., 
University of Wisconsin 

Yl-MING HSU (1975) Chairperson. Department 
of Professional and Secondary Education; Professor 
B.A. National Taiwan University; M.A., 
University of Oregon; D.Ed., University of 
Georgia 

LINDA HUFF (2002) Assistant Professor of 

English 

B.A., Morgan State University; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Pittsburgh 

JANE HUTTON (2005) Assistant Professor of 

Library Services 

B.A., Earlham College; M.S., Drexel University 

LAURI HYERS (2004) Assistant Professor of 

Psychology 

B.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

JOHN L. HYNES (1990) Professor of Professional 
and Secondary Education 

B.A., State University of New York at Albany; 
M.A., State University of New York at 
Binghamton; Ph.D., State University of New York 
at Albany 

CAROL ISAACSON-BRISELLI (1988) 

Assistant Professor of Instrumental Music 
B.A., State University of New York; M.M., 
Temple University 

K^\THLEEN JACKSON (2002) Assistant 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., West Chester State College; Ed.D., Temple 

University 

JOANN JAWORKSI (2000) Assistant Professor of 

Literacy 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.Ed., 
MillcrsviUe University; Ph.D., State University of 
New York at Albany 

TAMMY C. JAMES (1994) Associate Professor of 

Health 

B.S., M.E., Ph.D., Kent State University 

JANE E.JEFFREY (1991) Professor of English 
B.A., Memphis State; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Iowa 

ELAINE B. JENKS (1992) Professor of 
Communication Studies 

B.A., Universin- of Maryland; M.A., Gannon 
University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

ZHEN JL\NG (2002) Associate Professor of 
Computer Science 

B.S., Shanghai Jiaotong University; M.S., Nanjing 
University; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University 

CAROLYN CONSUELO JIMENEZ (1994) 
Chairperson. Department of Sports Medicine; 
Associate Professor 

B.A., Colorado College; M.S., University of 
Arizona; Ph.D., Temple University 

ALLEN H.JOHNSON (\91 A) Associate Professor 
of Geology 

B.S., University of Illinois; M.S., Uiuversity of 
Arizona; Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University 



i\ii iilt\ 



DEIDRE ANN JOHNSON (1991) Associate 
Professor of English 

B.A., Knox CoUcge; M.A., Eastern Michigan; 
Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

VANESSA K.JOHNSON (1999) Assistant 
Professor of Psychology 

B.S., University of Washington, Seattle; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 

CLIFFORD A.JOHNSTON (1992) Associate 
Professor of Mathematics 
B.S.E., Mansfield University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Temple University 

SUSAN L.JOHNSTON (2001) Associate 
Professor of Anthropology and Sociology 
B.A., University of Pennsylvania; B.S., 
Hahnemann University; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

JAMES A. JONES (1992) Professor of History 
B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of Delaware 

MILDRED C. JOYNER (1981) Associate 
Professor of Social Work 
B.S.W., Central State University; M.S.W., 
Howard University 

FRANK KADERABEK (1995) Instructor of 
Applied Music 

SETH KAHN (2002) Assistant Professor of English 
B.A., Wake Forest University; M.A., Florida State 
University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

WALLACE J. KAHN (1977) Professor of 
Counseling and Educational Psychology 
B.S., Bloomsburg University; M.Ed., A.G.S., 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 

ORHAN KARA (2Q0i) Assistant Professor of 
Economics and Finance 
B.A., University of Ankara; M.S., Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin - Madison; Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee 

BARBARA A. KAUFFMAN (1987) Instructor of 
Criminal Justice 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., 
University of Pennsylvania; J.D., Temple 
University School of Law 

JOHN J. KENNEDY (2001) Assistant Professor of 

Political Science 

B.S., M.RA., Kutztown University; Ph.D., Temple 

University 

SANDRA L. KERR (1994) Professor of Psychology 
B.A., Boston College; M.A., Ph.D., State 
University of New York at Stony Brook 

JOHN J. KERRIGAN (1972) Professor of 

Mathematics 

B.S., West Chester University; M.A., Villanova 

University; D.Ed., Temple University 

JOHN A. KINSLOW (1998) Associate Professor of 

Professional and Secondary Education 

B.A., Antioch University; M.Ed., Ph.D., Temple 

Universit)' 

LISA A. KIRSCHENBAUM (1996) Assistant 

Chairperson. Department of History; Associate 

Professor 

A.B., Brown University; M.A., Ph.D., University 

of California, Berkeley 

SARA LAiMB KISTLER (2004) Assistant 
Professor of Elementary Education 
B.S., M.A., West Chester University; Ph.D., 
University of Delaware 



SHARON B. KLETZIEN (1991) Cbairpmon, 
Defartmtnt oj Literacy; Profesior 
B.A., West Texas Slate University; M.A., 
American I'niversirv'; Ph.D., Temple Universitj- 

ROBERT M. KUNE (1991) Assoctate Professor of 

Computer Science 

B.A., Millcrsville University; Ph.D., Washington 

University 

TERRY KLINEFELTER (2000) Assistant 
Professor of Applied Music 

B.S.Ed., M.M.. West Chester University; M.M., 
Temple Universitj' 

DENNIS R. KLINZING (1976) Chairperson. 
Department of Communication Studies: Professor 
B.S., Clarion Universit)'; M.A., Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University 

MAUREEN T. KNABB (1986) Professor of 

Biology 

B.S., St. Joseph's University; Ph.D., University of 

Virginia 

KAREN M. YJOUiLm.(\9il) Associate Professor 

of Kinesiology 

B.S., The King's College; M.A., Northern 

Michigan Universit)'; Ed.D., University of North 

Carohna-Greensboro 

MAREILE A. KOENIG (1990) Associate Professor 
of Communicative Disorders 
B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois University; Ph.D., 
Universirj' of Illinois 

V. KRISHNA KUMAR (1977) Professor of 

Psychology 

B.S., Osmania University (India); M.S., Indian 

Agricultural Research Institute; M.S., Ph.D., 

Universit)' of Wisconsin-Madison 

PETER T. KYPER (1987) Director, Academic 

Development Program; Professor of Educatidnal 

Services 

B.A., Universit)' of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Auburn 

University 

JANET LACEY (2000) Associate Professor of 

Health 

B.S., Simmons College; M.S., M.Ed., University 

of Massachusens; Dr.P.H., University of North 

Carolina 

WILLL\M LALICKER (1995) Associate Professor 
of English 

B.A., Loyola Marymount University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Washington 

MARGARETEJ. LANDWEHR (1992) 
Associate Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.S., Georgetown University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Harvard University 

ELIZABETH LARSEN (1984) Professor of 

English 

B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., 

University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

RANDALL E. LASALLE (1998) Associate 
Professor of Accounting 

B.S., University of Delaware; M.S., Universit)' of 
Baltimore; Ph.D., Drexel University 

KENNETH L. LAUDERMILCH (1968) 
Professor of Applied Music 
B.S., Lebanon Valley College; M.Mus., New 
England Conservatory of Music; D.M.A., 
Catholic University of America 

EVAN A. LEACH (1993) Associate Professor of 

Management 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., West 

Chester University; M.A., Ph.D., Yale University 



HERBERT LEE (1968) Chairperson, Department 

of Educational Services; Associate Professor 
B.S., M.Ed., West Chester University- 

JONGDOO LEE (2004) Assistant Professor of 
Economics and Finance 

B.A., Yonseli University; M.B.A., University of 
Rochester; Ph.D., George Washington University 

THOMAS J. LEGG (2000) Chairperson. 
Department of History; Assistant Professor 
B.A., State Universit)- of New York at Cortland; 
M.A., State University of New York at Brockporr, 
Ph.D., CoUcge of William and Mary 

PATRICIA LENKOWSKI {\9<)S) Associate 
Professor of Library Services 
B.A., Glassboro State College; M.S., Drexel 
Universit)'; M.Ed., Widener University 

MONICA P LEPORE (1983) Professor of 

Kinesiology 

B.S., College of Mount Saint Vincent; M.S., 

University of Wisconsin; Ed.D., New York 

University 

DAVID G. LEVASSEUR (1997) Associate 
Professor of Communication Studies 
B.A., M.A., University of Maryland-College 
Park; Ph.D., University of Kansas 

JAMES R LEWANDOWSKJ (1991) Professor of 
Geography and Planning 
B.A., M.A., University of Toledo; Ph.D., Ohio 
State University 

HUIMIN (AMY) LI (KXiA) Assistant Professor of 
Economics and Finance 

B.E., M.A., Xi'an Jiaotong University (China); 
Ph.D., Drexel University 

PETER H, LOEDEL (1996) Chairperson, 
Department of Political Science; Associate Professor 
B.A., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of California, 
Santa Barbara 

EDWARD J. LORDAN (2001) Assistant Professor 
of Communication Studies 
B.A., West Chester University; M.A., Temple 
University; Ph.D., Syracuse University 

HENRY R. LOUSTAU (1999) Associate Professor 
of Art 

B.A., Dartmouth College; M.F.A., University of 
Illinois - Urbana-Champaign 

PATRICK W. LUCK (1973) Associate Professor of 

Sociology 

B.A., University of Vermont; M.A., Ph.D., . 

University of Connecticut 

COLLEEN T LUDEKER (1990) Associate 

Professor of Music Education 

B.M.E., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; 

M.M., DePauw University; Ed.D., West Virginia 

University 

TIMOTHY LUTZ (1998) Associate Professor of 

Geology 

B.A., Wcsleyan Universit)'; Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 

GLENN LYONS (1984) Assistant Professor of 

Applied Music 

B.A., Harpur College; M. Mus., Peabody 

Conservatory of Music of Johns Hopkins 

University 

CHARLOrrE MACKEY (1998) Assistant 

Chaiperson, Department of Nursing; Associate 

Professor 

B.S.N., Eastern College; M.S.N., D.Ed., Widener 

University 



RODNEY MADER (1999) Assistant Professor of 

English 

B.A., Ph.D., Temple University 

ROBERT C. MAGGIO (1991) Chairperson. 
Department of Music Theory/Composition; Professor 
B.A., Yale Universit)'; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

MARY ANN O. MAGGITTI (1970) Professor of 
Early Childhood and Special Education 
B.A., Emannuel College; M.S., Central 
Connecticut State College; Ph.D., Temple 
University 

DEBORAH MAHLSTEDT (1988) Professor of 

Psychology 

B.S., State University of New York at Rockporr, 

M.Ed., Ph.D., Temple University 

PAUL L. MALTBY (1991) Professor of English 
B.A., Thames Polytechnic; M.A., London 
University; Ph.D., Sussex University 

LISA E. MARANO (2002) Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 

B.A., Rider University; M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh 

University 

ROBERT J. MARBACH (1976) Professor of 

Political Science 

B.A., La Salle University; M.A., Ph.D., Temple 

University 

STEPHEN MARVIN (2000) Assistant Professor of 
Library Services 

B.A., State University of New York; M.L.S., 
Syracuse Universit)' 

THOMAS M. MASTRILLI (1995) Associate 
Professor of Professional and Secondary Education 
B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; 
Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh 

EDWARD M. MATEJKOVIC (1995) Athletic 

Director; Chairperson. Department of Athletics; 

Professor 

B.S., M.Ed., West Chester University; Ed.D., 

Temple Universit)' 

CHRISTINE A. MATUS (1999) Instructor of 

Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., West Chester University 

SUNITA MAYOR (2000) Assistant Professor of 

Literacy 

B.A., University of Calcutta; B.Ed., University of 

Rohtak; M.Ed., Xavier University; Ed.D., 

University of Cincinnati 

GUSTAVE N. MBUY (1985) Associate Professor of 

Biology 

B.A., University of California; M.M., Ph.D., 

University of Cincinnati 

KRISTEN A. McCASKEY (200\) Assistant 

Professor of Music Education 

B.S., Millcrsville University; M.Ed., Shippcnsburg 

University 

CHRISTINA W. McCAWLEY (1971) Professor 

of Library Services 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.S.L.S., 

Catholic Universit)' of America; Ph.D., Drexel 

University 

DOUGLAS McCONATHA (1988) Professor of 

Sociology 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., University of 

Atlanta; Ph.D., University of Utah; M.RH., Yale 

University 



|-'.imli\ 



JASMIN T. McCONATHA (1990) Professor of 

Psychology 

B.A., University of Utah; M.S., Jacksonville State 

University; Ph.D., University of" Georgia 

RALPH CARL McCOY (1996) Assistant 
Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.A., Emory College; M.K.A., North Carolina 
School of the Arts 

ANN McFARLAND (1999) Assistant Professor of 

Musk Education 

B.M., Susquehanna University; M^us., Temple 

University 

CHARLES H. McGEE (1987) Chairperson. 
Department of Management; Associate Professor 
B.A., University of California, Santa Barbara; 
M.A., University of Southern California; Ph.D., 
Northwestern University 

VaCKI A. UiGV^lXX (Vi'il') Associate Professor 
of Early Childhood and Special Education 
B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.A., Ph.D., 
Temple University 

RANDOLPl I T McVEY (1999) Assistant 
Professor of Criminal Justice 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Sam Houston State University 

JENNIFER W. MEANS (2004) Assistant 
Professor of Communicative Disorders 
B.S., MA., West Chester University; S.L.P.D., 
Nova Southeastern University' 

SHERI A. MELTON (1998) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of Kinesiology; Associate 

Professor 

B.A., Loyola University; M.Ed., University of 

New Orleans; Ph.D., Louisiana State University 

OWEN METCALF (1989) Assistant Professor of 
Applied Music 

B.M., M.M., University of Colorado; D.M., 
Indiana University 

CHERYL L. MICHEAU (\99Q) Associate 
Professor of English 

B.S.Ed., Millersville University-; M.A, Middlebury 
College; M.A., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

ELAINE R. MIUTO (1981) Professor of 

Computer Science 

B.S., State University of New York at Stony 

Brook; M.A., Cit)' Universit)' of New York, 

Queens College; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 

LISA MILLHOUS (1999) Assistant Professor of 
Communication Studies 

B.A., Macalester College; M.A., Ph.D., University 
of Minnesota 

FRANK E. MILLIMAN (1960) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of Mathematics; Associate 

Professor 

B.N.S., College of Holy Cross; A.B., Hobart 

College; A.M., Columbia University 

DUANE D. MILNE (1999) Director, M.Sjt., 
Program; Assistant Professor of Political Science 
B.A., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., 
University of Delaware 

GARRETT G. MOLHOLT (1987) Professor of 

English 

B.A., M.A., MJV., Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin-Madison 



ROBERT MOMYER (1986) Assistant Professor of 

Instructional Media 

B.S., Philadelphia CoUege of Arr, M.Ed., Lehigh 

University 

CECILY MOON {2Q0\) Assistant Profissor of Art 
B.F.A., Mount Allison Univesity; M.F.A., Long 
Island University 

EDMUNDO MORALES (1989) Chairperson. 
Department of Anthropology and Sociology; Professor 
B.A., Richmond College; M.A., New York ' 
University; Ph.D., Cit)' University of New York 

MICHAEL J. MORAN (I9m) Assistant 
Chairperson. Department of Chemistry; Professor 
B.S., St. Joseph's College; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

JOAN NL\RY MORGAN (2000) Instructor of 
Theatre Arts 

R.N., General Nursing Council for England and 
Wales; M.F.A., Brandeis University 

PAUL MORGAN (\999) Assistant Chairperson. 

Department of Professional and Secondary Education; 

Associate Professor 

B.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., Columbia 

University 

TANYA MORGAN (2000) Assistant Professor of 

Health 

B.A., M.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., 

University of North Carolina 

WALENA C. MORSE (1968) Professor of 

Psychology 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 

College 

ANNE-MARIE L. MOSCATELLI (1991) 
Chairperson, Department of Foreign Languages; 
Associate Professor 

B.A., Fordham Universit)'; M.A., Ph.D., Bryn 
Mawr College 

JOSEPH G. MOSER (1966) Associate Professor of 

Mathematics 

B.S., Rose Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Purdue 

Universit)' 

STERLING E. MURRAY (1972) Chairperson. 

Department of Music History and Literature; 

Professor 

B.Mus., University of Maryland; A.M., Ph.D., 

Universit)' of Michigan 

ROGER W. MUSTALISH (1978) Chairperson. 

Department of Health; Professor 

A.B., Universit)' of Pcnns)'lvania; M.S., Michigan 

State University; M.P.H., Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota 

KOSTAS MYRSL\DES (1969) Professor of 

English 

B.A., University of Iowa; Mj\., Ph.D., Indiana 

University 

LINDA S. MYRSIADES (1990) Professor of 

English 

B.A., Beaver College; MJV., Ph.D., Indiana 

University 

ALI NAGGAR (1977) Professor of Accounting 
B.Com., Cairo Universit)-; M.B.A., Long Island 
Universit)'; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 

TAHAiNY NAGGAR (1977) Professor of 
Economics and Finance 

B.Com., Rigadh University; MA., Long Island 
University; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 



CAROL M. NAPIERKOWSKI (\9%9) Associate 
Professor of Counseling and Educational Psychology 
B. A., Temple University; M.A., Villanova 
University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

REGINALD NEALY (1986) Assistant Professor of 

Criminal Justice 

A.A., Pennsylvania State Police Academy; B.S., 

Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Lincoln 

Universit)' 

LARRY A. NELSON (1971) Professor of Music 

Theory/Composition 

B.Mus., University of Denver; M.Mus., Southern 

Illinois University; Ph.D., Michigan State 

University 

PAULA NELSON (1998) Instructor of Applied 

Music 

B.A., Universit)- of Maryland; M.M., D.M.A., 

University of North Texas 

PATRICIA A. NESTER (1984) Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N., M.S.N., Medical School of Georgia; 
Diploma in Nursing, Gastonia Memorial Hospital 

JANA L. NESTLERODE (1986) Chairperson, 
Department of Criminal Justice; Professor 
B.A., Pennsylvania State University; J.D., 
Widener University 

JOHN T NEWCOMB (1990) Associate Professor 

of English 

A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

University 

PATRICIA NEWLAND (2004) Assistant 

Professor of Library Services 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.S.L.S., Clarion 

University 

ANTHONY J. NICASTRO (1990) Chairperson. 
Department of Physics; Associate Professor 
B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Delaware 

VIOREL NITICA (2001) Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Univesity of Bucharest Ph.D., 

Pennsylvania State University 

KAREN NOLAN {2001) Assistant Professor of 

Literacy 

B.A., Grove City CoUege; M.Ed., West Chester 

Universit)-; Ed.D., Universit)- of Penns)'lvania 

ELIZABETH NOLLEN (1986) Instructor of 

English 

B.A., Ohio University; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana 

University 

ISAAC B. NORRJS (1986) Director. Professional 
Studies; Instructor of Sports Medicine 
B.S., West Chester University; M.A., University 
of Maryland 

KATHERINE NORTHROP (1999) Associate 
Professor of English 

B.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.F.A., 
Universit)- of Iowa 

ROBERT P NYE (1968) Professor cf Health 
A.B., Gettysburg College; M.Ed., West Chester 
University; EaI.D., Temple University 

PETER OEHLERS (2004) Assistant Professor of 

Accounting 

B.S., Rowan University; M.B.A., Drexel 

University; D.B.A., Louisiana Tech University 

JUUAN ONDERDONK (2O0\) Assistant 

Professor of Music History 

B.A., Bowdoin CoUege; M.A., Ph.D., New York 

University 



lacultv 



GWENELLE S. O'NEAL (1998) Associau 
Pro/eijor of Graduate Social Work 
B.A., Spelman College; M.S.W., New York 
University; D.S.W., Columbia University 

BRIAN F. O'NEILL (1998) Aisociate Professor of 
Criminal justice 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.S.W., 
Marywood College; Ph.D., Cit)' University of 
New York 

C.JACK ORR (1986) Professor of Communication 

Studies 

B.A., Messiah College; B.D., Eastern Baptist 

Theological Seminary; M.A., Northwestern 

Univcrsit)'; Ph.D., Temple Univcrsit)' 

MARGARET OTTLEY (2001) Assistant 

Professor of Kinesiology 

B.A., Spelman College; M.Ed., Ph.D., New York 

University 

SHARON OWENS (1999) Assistant Professor of 
Graduate Social Work 

B.A., Alabama A &M University; M.S.W., 
University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Ph.D., Clark 
Atlanta University 

RICHARD D. PARSONS (1990) Professor of 

Counseling and Educational Psychology 

B.A., Villanova University; M.A., Ph.D., Temple 

University 

MICHELLE PATRICK (2003) Associate Professor 
of Marketing 

B.S.B.A., M.B.A., Youngstown State University; 
Ph.D., Kent State University 

FREDERICK R. PATTON (1981) Professor of 
Foreign Languages 

B.A.. M.Ed., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

MARTIN PATWELL (1994) Director. O.S.S.D.. 
Associate Professor of Educational Services 
B.A., Manhattan College; M.S., Marist College; 
Ed.D., Boston University 

PETER PAULSEN (1989) Instructor of Applied 

Music 

B.M., West Chester University 

REBECCA PAULY (1987) Professor of Foreign 

Languages 

B.A., Smith College; M.A., University of 

California, Berkeley; D.M.L., Middlebury College 

MICHAEL V. PEARSON (\9eS) Associate 
Professor of Communication Studies 
B.A., lona College; M.A., William Patterson 
College; Ph.D., Temple University 

MICHAEL A. PEICH (1968) Professor of English 
B.A., Wartburg College; M.A., University of 
Pennsylvania 

ROBERT A. PELOSO (1993) Instructor of 
Computer Science 

B.E.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., Carnegie 
Mellon University 

ROBERT E. PENNINGTON (1966) Professor of 

Applied Music 

B.Mus., M.Mus., D.Mus., Northwestern 

University 

CHRISTIAN V. PENNY (2002) Assistant 
Professor of Professional and Secondary Education 
B.S., Lock Haven University; M.Ed., East 
Stroudsburg University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 
University 



JUUE A. PERONE (1990) Assistant Professor of 

Counseling 

B.S., M.A., M.RA., Ohio State University; Ph.D., 

University of Maryland 

G. KING PERRY (1983) Instructor of Computer 

Science 

B.S., M.Ed., Bloomsburg University 

MERRY G. PERRY (2002) Assistant Professor of 

English 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., University of South Florida 

W. BENNETT PETERS (1973) Professor of 

History 

B.A., Pomona College; M.A., California State 

University, San Francisco; Ph.D., University of 

California, Santa Barbara 

PATRICL\ A. PFLIEGER (1988) Assistant 
Professor of English 

B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., Eastern 
Michigan University; Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota 

JASON PHILLIPS {\999) Associate Professor of 

Marketing 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.B.A., Texas 

A 8c M University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 

THOMAS W. PLATT (1968) Chairperson, 

Department of Philosophy; Professor 

B.A., Washington and Jefferson College; M.A., 

University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 

JOAN POLKA (1990) Assistant Professor of 

Counseling Services 

B.A., Holy Family College; M.A., West Chester 

University 

EDWARD I. POLLAK (1977) Professor of 

Psychology 

B.A., State University of New York at 

Binghamton; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Connecticut 

CHERISE POLLARD i\999) Assistant Professor 
of English 

B.A., Rutgers -The State University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 

YURY POLSKY (1989) Professor of Political 

Science 

B.A., M.A., University of Moscow; Ph.D., 

University of Michigan 

RUTH PORRITT (1991) Associate Professor of 

Philosophy 

B. A., John Carroll University; Ph.D., Purdue 

University' 

JACK PORTER (1968) Professor of Psychology 
B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Temple University 

LOUIS H. PORTER (1974) Professor of 

Psychology 

B.A., Ohio University; M.A., Ph.D., Howard 

University 

CATHERINE M. PRUDHOE (1992) Assistant 
Chairperson, Department of Early Childhood and 
Special Education; Associate Professor 
B.S., M.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 
University of Delaware 

CAROL A. RADICH (1972) Professor of 
Elementary Education 

B.A., Glassboro State CoUege; M.Ed., Ph.D., 
University of Maryland 



DENIS RAIHALL (\9V)) Assistant Professor of 

Economics and Finance 

B.A., Bethany College; M.B.A., University of 

Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 

GEETHA RAMANATHAN (1987) Director, 
Women's Studies Program; Professor of English 
M.A., University of Bombay; A.M., University of 
Illinois; Ph.D., Universit)' of Illinois at 
Urbana-Champaign 

J. WESLEY RANCK (1999) Imtnutor of 

Kinesiology 

B.S., M.S., West Chester University 

JUDITH D. RAY (1978) Assistant Professor of 

Kinesiology 

A.B.E. of Harris Teachers College; M.A.Ed., 

Washington University; Ph.D., University of 

Minnesota 

TIMOTHY RAY (2003) Assistant Professor of 

English 

B.A., M.A., University of Central Oklahoma; 

Ph.D., Bowling Green State University 

JOHN T. REDINGTON (1992) Chairperson. 
Department of Marketing; Associate Professor 
B.S., M.B.A., Temple University; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University 

HELEN G. REID (1975) Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 

B.A., B.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., 

University of New Orleans 

MARTIN S. REMLAND i\99\) Associate 

Professor of Communication Studies 

B.A., Western Illinois University; M.A., Central 

Michigan Universit)'; Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

Universit)' 

ARLENE C. RENGERT (1976) Professor of 
Geography and Planning 
A.B., Indiana University; M.A., Ohio State 
University; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

JOEL M. ^<E.SSNER{19S4) Associate Professor of 

Chemistry 

B.S., Lehigh Univcrsit)'; M.Sc, University of 

Sussex; Ph.D., Lehigh University 

JANE RICHTER (1986) Assistant Professor of 

Applied Music 

B.S., M.M., Temple University; D.M.A., Combs 

College 

RANDALL H. RIEGER (2000) Associate 
Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Bowdoin College; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina 

LORETTA RIESER-DANNER (1997) Associate 
Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 
University of Texas at Austin 

GREGORY E. RILEY (2002) Assistant Professor 
of Applied Music 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.M., Universit)' of 
Missouri - Kansas City; D.M.A., University of 
Southern California 

MARK T RIMPLE (2000) Associate Professor of 

Music Theory/Composition 

B.Mus., Universit)' of the Arts; M.Mus., D.M.A., 

Temple University 

RALPH RODRIGUEZ (1999) Assistant Professor 

of Management 

B.S., Philadelphia College of Bible; M.B.A., 
Johnson School, Cornell Universit)'; Ph.D., 
Temple Universit)' 



BEATRICE ROLLAND (2004) /lisiirant 

Professor ojAccounling 

B.S., M.B.A., Temple University; D.B.A., Argosy 

University 

WILLIAM D. ROSENZWEIG (X^W) Assistant 
Professor of Biology 

B.S., St. John's University; M.S., Long Island 
University; Ph.D.. New York L'niversity 

JOHN P. ROSSO (1998) Instructor of Foreign 

Languages 

B.A., I laverford College; M.A., University of 

Pennsylvania 

HARVEY ROVINE (1992) Professor of Theatre Arts 
B.S., Towson State University; M.A., University of 
Central Florida; Ph.D., University of Illinois 

ALEXANDER ROZIN {imi) Assistant Professor 
of Music Theory/Comfosition 
B.A., University of California at Berkeley; Ph.D., 
University of Pennsylvania 

NANCY J. RUMFIELD (1986) Associate Professor 
of Art 

B.F.A., Moore College of Art; M.S., West Chester 
University; Ph.D., Nova Southeastern University 

ELBERT M. SADDLER (X'iiS) Associate 
Professor of Counseling Center 
A.B., Rutgers -The State University; M.Ed., 
Ph.D., Icmple University 

JANE WESTON SADDORIS (1971) Instructor 
of Theatre 

B.S., West Chester University; M.A. in 
Education, Villanova University 

MICHEL H. SAGE (1994) Associate Professor of 
Foreign Languages 

M.A., San Diego University; Ph.D., University of 
California, Berkeley 

DONNA R. SANDERSON {200\) Assistant 
Professor of Elementary Education 
B.S., James Madison Universit}'; M.S., Widener 
University; Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 

BHIM SANDHU (1978) Associate Professor of 
Political Science 

B.A., Punjab University (India); M.A., University 
of Texas; Ph.D., University of Missouri 

GOPAL SANKARAN (1989) Professor of Health 
B.S., M.B., Maulanaazad Medical College (India); 
M.D., All India Institute of Medical Sciences; 
M.RH., Dr. PH., University of California, 
Berkeley 

AMY SANTOS (2004) Assistant Professor of 

Literacy 

B.S., West Chester University; M.S., Pennsylvania 

State University 

KANAN SAWYER (2004) Assistant Professor of 
Communication Studies 

B.S., California Polytechnic State University; 
.\I.A., University of Washington; Ph.D., 
University of Te.\as 

JUDITH A. SCHEFFLER (1985) Assistant 
Chairperson, Department of English: Professor 
A.B., Muhlenburg College; M.A., Purdue 
University; M.A., Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

ROBERTA L. SCHINI (2001) Assistant Professor 
of Economics and Finance 

B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 



CHERYL SCHLAMB (2002) Instructor of 

Nursing 

B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S.N., University 

of Pennsylvania 

STACEY SCHLAU (1985) Professor of Foreign 

Languages 

B.A., M.A., Queens College; Ph.D., City 

University of New York 

FRAUKE L SCHNELL (1992) Professor of 

Political Science 

B.A., University of Tuebingen (Germany); M.A., 

Ph.D., State University of New York at Stony 

Brook 

R. GERALD SCHOELKOPF (1969) 

Chairperson, Department of Library Services; 

Assistant Professor 

B.A., Villanova University; M.S.L.S., McGiU 

University 

RANI G. SELVANATHAN (\9U) Associate 

Professor of Management 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Delhi (India); 

Ph.D., University of Paris 

GUS V SERMAS (1971) Professor of Art 

B.A., Baylor University; B.F.A., B.S., University of 

Texas; M.F.A., University of Wisconsin 

LEIGH S. SHAFFER (1980) Professor of 
Anthropology and Sociology 
B.S., M.S., Wichita State University; Ph.D.,' 
Pennsylvania State University 

MAURA J. SHEEHAN (1980) Professor of Health 
B.S., Lowell Technological Institute; M.S., 
University of Lowell; Sc.D., University of 
Pittsburgh 

ELEANOR F SHEVLIN (200\) Assistant 
Professor of English 

A.B., Georgetown University; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Maryland 

CHARLES V SHORTEN (1989) Professor of 
Health 

'B.S., M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and 
State University; Ph.D., Clemson University 

DAVID 1. SIEGEL (1990) Associate Professor of 
Social Work 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.S.W., University of 
Michigan; D.S.W., Columbia University 

FRANCES A. SLOSTAD (1996) Assistant 
Chairperson, Department of Elementary Education; 
Associate Professor 

B.S., West Chester University; M.A., Villanova 
University; Ed.D., Immaculata College 

LESLIE B. SLUSHER (1991) Professor of Biology 
B.S., North Carohna State University; Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University 

ARTHUR R. SMITH (\n4) Associate Professor of 

Geology and Astronomy 

A.B., M.S., Ed.D., University of Pennsylvania 

CARL M. SMITH (1971) Assistant Professor of 

Accounting 

B.B.A., M.B.A., Temple University; C.RA., 

Commonwealth ot Pennsylvania 

LUANNE SMITH (\989) Associate Professor of 

English 

B.A., University of Kentucky; M.A., Murray State 

University; M.F.A., Pennsylvania State University 

PAUL K. SMITH (1985) Associate Professor of 

Kinesiology 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University-. Ph.D., 

Southern Illinois Umversit\ 



THOMAS H. SMITH (2002) Assistant Professor 
of Mathematics 

B.S., St. Joseph's University; Ed.M., West Chester 
University; Ed.D, Temple University 

ROBERTA SNOW (1989) Professor of 

Management 

B.A., M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., 

University of Pennsylvania 

CAROLYN SORISIO (1999) Associate Professor of 

English 

B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.A., Ph.D., 

Temple University 

ALICE J. SPEH (1989) Director, Liberal Studies 
Program; Associate Professor of Foreign languages 
A.B., Brown University; M.A., Ph.D., Bryn Mawr 
College 

LYNN KELL SPRADLIN (1995) Chairperson. 
Department of Counseling and Educational 
Psychology; Associate Professor 
B.A., University of Kentucky; M.Ed., Ed.D., 
University of Louisville 

DAVID A. SPRENKLE (1987) Professor, Applied 

Music 

B.S,, M.M., West Chester University; D.M.A., 

University of Maryland 

ELIZABETH LEEANN SROGI (1991) 
Professor of Geology and Astronomy 
B.S., Yale University; Ph.D., University of 
Pennsylvania 

PAUL STANG (2004) Associate Professor of Health 
B.A., University of North Carolina; M.S., State 
University of New York, Stony Brook; Ph.D., 
University of North Carolina 

TIMOTHY K. STARN (1996) Associate Professor 

of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., Indiana University 

W. CRAIG STEVENS (1992) Assistant 

Chairperson, Department of Kinesiology; Associate 

Professor 

B. A., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., Springfield 

College; Ph.D., Temple University 

LINDA S. STEVENSON (2002) Assistant 
Professor of Political Science 
B.A., College of Wooster; M.A., Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh 

JOHN STOLAR (1988) Professorof Geology and 

Astronomy 

B.S., Shippensburg University; M.Ed., West 

Chester University; Ed.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 

PAUL STOLLER (1980) Professor of Anthropology 
and Sociology 

B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., Georgetown 
University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 

ANN COGHLAN STOWE (1984) Chairperson, 
Department of Nursing; Assistant Professor 
B.S.N. , M.S.N., University of Pennsylvania; 
Diploma in Nursing, Thomas Jefferson University; 
D.N. Sc, Widener University 

FREDERICK R. STRUCKMEYER (1966) 

Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., King's College (N.Y.); A.M., Ph.D., Boston 

University 

GRETCHEN STUDLIEN-WEBB (1999) 

Associate Professor of Dance 

B.F.A., Ohio State University; M.F.A., Temple 

University 



Katulu' 



ROBERT J. SZABO (1974) /Issociatt Pnfeuor of 

Literacy 

B.S., Kutztown University; M.Ed.. Ed.D., Lehigh 

University 

WACLAW SZYMANSKI (1985) Projessor of 

Mathematics 

M.A.. Jagicllonian University (Poland); Ph.D., 

D.Sc, Polish Academy of Sciences 

JOHN C.TACHOVSKY (1970) Professor of 

Geography 

B.S., M.Ed., West Chester University; Ph.D., 

University of Cincinnati 

LIN TAN (1989) Professor of Mathematics 
B.S., M.A., Zhejian University; M.S., Ph.D., 
University' of California, Los Angeles 

CHRISTOPHER J. TEUTSCH (1989) Associate 
Professor of English 

M.A., Jagiellonian University (Poland); Ph.D., 
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee 

LaTONYA THAMES-LEONARD (2001) 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Tougaloo College; M.A., University' of 

Mississippi 

CHRISTINE THOMAS (1999) Assistnat 
Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N., AUentown College of St. Francis; M.S.N., 
Indiana Universit)' of Pcnnsylrania; D.N.S., 
Widener University 

WESLEY W. THOMAS (1979) Professor of 

Management 

B.S., University of Maine; M.S., West Chester 

University; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

PHILIP A. THOMPSEN (1997) Associate 
Professor of Communication Studies 
B.S., Northern Arizona University; M.S., 
University of Southwestern Louisiana; Ph.D., 
University of Utah 

BRENT WESLEY THOMPSON (2001) 
Assistant Professor of Nursing 
B.S.N., M.S., University of Delaware; D.N.Sc, 
Widener University 

HARRY TIEBOUT III (1992) Professor of Bio/ogy 
B.A., University of Illinois; Ph.D., University of 
Florida 

VICTORIA TISCHIO (1998) Associate Professor 
of English 

B.S., M.A., Southern Connecticut State 
University; Ph.D., State University of New York 
at Albany 

THOMAS W. TOLIN (1992) Assistant Professor 
of Economics and Finance 
B.A., University of Southwestern Louisiana; 
Ph.D., University of Houston 

SANDRA M. TOMKOWICZ (1993) Director. 

Pre-Law Program; Associate Professor of Marketing 

(Legal Studies) 

B.S., La Salle University; J.D., University of 

Pennsylvania 

JOHN R. TOWNSEND (1998) Associate Professor 
of Chemistry 

B.A., University of Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., 
Cornell University 

THO^'L\S H. TOWNSEND (1999) Instructor of 
Computer Science 

B.A., Oberlin CoUege; M.Sc, West Chester 
University; M.Sc, Ph.D., Purdue University 



THO^L\S TREADWELL (1968) Professor of 

Psychology 

B.A., Morris Harvey College; M.S., University of 

Bridgeport; Moreno Institute, New York 

(Certified Psychodramatist, T.E.P.); Ed.D., 

Temple University 

C. JAMES TROTMAN (1979) Professor of 

English 

B.A., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University; 

Ed.D., Columbia University 

MICHELLE L. TUCKER {\9SS) Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

B.S., Michigan State University; M.S.N., 
University of Michigan 

GREGORY TURNER (2004) Assistant Professor 
of Biology 

B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University; M.A., 
Hunter CoUege; M.Ed., Columbia University; 
Ph.D., Fordham University 

DONNA L. USHER (1991) Associate Professor of 

Art 

B.FA., B.S., Moore College of Art; M.F.A., 

University of Delaware 

MARLA VAN LIEW (1998) Associate Professor of 
Foreign Languages 

B.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University of 
California, San Diego 

ANDREA VARRICCHIO (1986) Associate 
Professor of Foreign Languages 
B.A., Chestnut HiU CoUege; M.A., Middlebury 
CoUege; Ph.D., Temple University 

CARLA LEE VERDERAME (199S) Associate 
Professor of English 

A.B., Smith CoUege; M.A.T., Brown University; 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

RICHARD K. VELETA (1965) Professor of 

Applied Music 

B.Mus., M.Mus., D.Mus., Northwestern 

University 

JOHN VILLELLA (1986) Chairperson, 
Department of Applied Music; Associate Professor 
B.S., M.M., West Chester Universit)'; Ed.D., 
Widener University 

KARIN A.E. VOLKWEIN (1992) Professor of 

Kinesiology 

Staatsexamen, University of Marburg (Germany); 

Ph.D., University of Tennessee 

RICHARD W. VOSS (1996) Associate Professor of 
Social Work 

B.A., St. Fidelis CoUege; M.S.W., Fordham 
University; D.P.C., Loyola CoUege 

RUSSELL H. VREELAND (1989) Associate 
Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Rutgers -The State Universit)'; Ph.D., 
University of Nebraska 

JACK WABER (1976) Chairperson, Department of 

Biology; Professor 

B.A., Hope CoUege (Mich.); Ph.D., University of 

Hawaii 

MATTHEW M. WAITE (2001) Assistant 

Professor of Physics 

B.A., Gettysburg College; Ph.D., University of 

Delaware 

DONNA WANDRY (1999) Associate Professor of 
Early Childhood and Special Education 
B.S., University of Wisconsin - Eau Claire; M.Ed., 
University of Utah; Ph.D., University of Florida 



CHERYL L. WANKO (1993) Chairperson, 
Department of English; Associate Professor 
B.A., New York University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Pennsylvania State University 

BARBARA BROWN WANTA (1983) Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 

B.S.N., University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Oxford 

University (U.K.); M.S.N., University of 

Pennsylvania 

JOHN W. WARD (1961) Associate Professor of 

English 

A.B., M.A., Miami University; Ph.D., University 

of Delaware 

MICHAEL S. WEISS (1978) Chairperson, 
Department of Communicative Disorders; Professor 
B.A., Long Island University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Purdue University 

JOAN M. WELCH (1990) Chairperson, 
Department of Geography and Planning; Professor 
B.A., St. Cloud State University; M.A., Ph.D., 
Boston Universit)' 

LESLEY A. WELSH (1991) Professor of 
Professional and Secondary Education 
B.A., Eastern Connecticut State Universit)-; M.A., 
Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

LINWOOD J. WHITE (1968) Associate Professor 
of Art . 

B.F.A., Maryland Institute College of Arr, 
M.F.A., Universit)' of Pennsylvania 

DLAN WILLIAMS (2004) Assistant Professor of 
Crim inal Justice 

R.N., Polyclinic Hospital School of Nursing; B.A., 
Antioch College; M.S., West Chester University; 
Ph.D., Walden UniversiU' 

JEROME M. WILLIAMS (1985) Professor of 
Foreign languages 

B.A., Haverford CoUege; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., 
Yale University 

JOHN G. WILLIAMS (1992) Associate Professor 
of Kinesiology 

B.Ed., University of Nottingham, U.K.; M.Ed., 
Universit)' of Bath, U.K.; Ph.D., University of 
London, U.K. 

THOMAS WINTERS (1988) Assistant Professor 
of Music History and Literature 
B.A., Bucknell' Universit)'; M.A., Ph.D., 
Universit)' of Pennsylvania 

SALLY A. WINTERTON (2001) Assistant 
Professor of Elementary Education 
B.A., Immaculata CoUege; M.Ed., West Chester 
Universit)'; D.Ed., University of Pennsylvania 

C. GIL V^SWALL (1985) Chairperson, 
Department of Geology and Astronomy; Professor 
B.A., Colgate University; M.S., Ph.D., University 
of Montana 

PAUL WOLFSON (1978) Associate Professor of 

Mathematics 

A.B., Columbia University; M.S., Ph.D., 

Universit)' of Chicago 

JOAN WOOLFREY (2000) Co-director. 
Pharmaceutical Product Development Program; 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 
B.S., North Dakota State Universit)'; M.A.,The 
New School for Social Research; Ph.D., 
University of Oregon 

JULIET WUNSCH (2000) Assistant Professor of 

Theatre 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.F.A., Carnegie 

MeUon University 




RICHARD W. WYATT (1989) dissociate Professor 
of Computer Science 

B.A., B.S., M.A., University of Melbourne; Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley; M.Sc, State 
University' of New York at Buttalo 

JANE A. WYSS (1990) Assistant Chairperson. 
Department of/lpplied Music; Associate Professor 
B.M., M.M., D.M.A., University of Texas at Austin 

CHEER-SUN D. YANG (2000) Associate 
Professor of Computer Science 
B.S., M.B.A.,Tamkang University; M.S., Kansas 
State University; Ph.D., University of Delaware 

JOANN YAWORSKJ (2000) Assistant Professor of 

Literacy 

B.A., Pennsylvania State Univcrsit)'; M.Ed., 

Millcrsville University; Ph.D., State Universit)' of 

New York at Albany 



INTAE YOON (2004) Assistant Professor of Social 
Work (Undergraduate) 
B.A., Konkuk University; M.S.W., Ph.D., 
University' of South Carohna 

K. HYOEJIN YOON (2002) Assistant Professor of 

English 

B.S., B.A., M.A., Virginia Polytechnic Institute 

and State University; Ph.D., University of Albany, 

State University of New York 

STEFANI YORGES (1996) Assistant Chairperson, 
Department of Psychology; Associate Professor 
B.A., Hastings College; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue 

University 

EDEN ZABAT (1997) Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 

B.S.N. , Pennsylvania State University; M.S.N., 

Villanova University 



l-aculr\' 



RAYMOND ZETTS (1997) Chairperson, 
Department of Kinesiology; Associate Professor 
B.A., Texas Lutheran College; M.A., Southwest 
Texas State University; Ed.D., University of 
Georgia-Athens 

NAIJIAN ZHANG (1999) Associate Professor of 
Counseling and Educational Psychology 
B.A., Xi'an Foreign Languages Institute (China); 
M.A., M.A., Bowling Green University 

PETER ZIMMER (2000) Assistant Professor of 

Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

University of Kansas 

ANTHONY W, ZUMPETTA (1988) Associate 
Professor of Anthropology and Sociology 
B.A., Edinboro Universit)'; M.A., Ed.D., Indiana 
University of Pennsylvania 



Adjunct Faculty 

MANULA BALASUBRAMANIAN Department 

of Biology 

M.D., Bangalore Medical College (India) 

ARTHUR R. BARTOLOZZI Department of 
Sports Medicine 

A.B., Brown University; M.D., University of 
California, San Diego 

JEAN BUCHENHORST Department of Biology 
B.S., University of Delaware; M.S., Medical 
College ot Pennsylvania, Hahnemann University 

DAVID K. COHOON Department of 

Mathematics 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S., 

Ph.D., Purdue University; David Ross Research 

Associateship at Institut Henri Poincare 

JOSEPH M, DIBUSSOLO Pharmaceutical 
Product Development Program 
B.S., West Chester University; M.S., Ph.D., 
Drexel University 

CUFFORD W. FAWCETT Department of 
Sports Medicine 

B.S.N., Cedarville College; M.Ed., University of 
Virginia; M.S.N., Universit)' of Delaware 

GAIL M. FELLOWS Department of Health 
B.S., University of Arizona; M.S., West Chester 
Universit)' 



CHARLES A. GARBER Department of Geology 
and Astronomy 

B,S., University of lUinois; M.S., Ph.D., Case 
Institute of Technology 

PHYLLIS GOTKIN Department of Biology 
B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Beaver 
College; Ph.D., Pacific Western University 

JOANNE S. GRANT Department of Biology 
B.S., Moravian College; M.S., Drexel Universit)' 

ZDENKA L.JONAK Department of Biology 
B.S., Charles University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale 
University 

BRIAN KELLAR, Department of Health 
A.S., West Chester University; B.A., M.S., 
Eastern College 

LORI KILLLAN, Department of Health 
A.S., Delaware County Community College; 
B.A., University of Redlands 

CARYN LENNON Department of Biology 
B.S., Quinnipiac College 

EDWIN T. LURCOTT Department of Geology 

and Astronomy 

B.S., Syracuse Universit)' 



HELEN E. MARTIN Department of Counselor. 

Secondary, and Professional Education 

B.A., Kings College, N.Y.; M.A., West Chester 

University 

WILLIAM K. NATALE Department of Biology 
A.B., Oberlin College; M.D.. Universit)' of 
Pittsburgh 

RONALD J. PEKALA Department rf Psychology 
B.S., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., 
Michigan State Universit)' 

RICHARD RUPKALVIS Department of Biology 
B.S., Illinois Benedictine College; M.D., Rush 
Medical College 

HOWARD L. RUSSELL Department of Biology 
B.A., Boston Universit)'; V.M.D., University of 
Pennsylvania; M.P.H., Tulanc University 

MICHAEL J. WARHOL Department of Biology 
A.B., Princeton University; M.D., University of 
Pittsburgh 

JACK CARLTON WHITE Department of 

Biology 

B.S., M.D., University of Vermonr, Diplomate, 

American Board of Surgery 

SUSAN VVU( Department of Health 

B.S., West Chester University; M.S., Eastern College 



Emeriti 

LOIS W. ALT, Vocal and Choral Music 

'ALEXANDER ANTONOWICH, Music 
Education 

•ELEANOR ASHKENAZ, Chemistry 

♦DOROTHY D. BAILEY, English 

MARSHALL J. ^ECKS.K, Anthropology and 
Sociology 

•HAROLD W. BENDA, Dean of Education 

•BERNICE BERNATZ, Dean of Women 

ROBERT BERNHARDT, Biology 

E ROBERT BIELSKI, Geography and Planning 

WALTER R. BLAIR. Educational Services 

'JAMES A. BINNEY, English 

'MARY M.%UiS, Biology 

JUSTO B. BRAVO, Chemistry 



WALTER E. BUECHELE, JR., Counselor, 
Secondary, and Professional Education 

H. JAMES BURGWYN, History 

ROBERT E. CARLSON, History 

'PAUL E. CARSON, Music 

DIANE O. CASAGRANDE, Communication 
Studies 

CONRAD E. CHAUCK, Counseling 

NONA E. CHERN, Childhood StudUs and 
Reading 

K. ELEANOR CHRISTENSEN, Childhood 
Studies and Reading 

CARMELA L. CINQUINA, Biology 

MARY E. CLEARY, Education 

'JOHN W. CLOKEY, Dean of Arts and Letters 



BARBARA J. COATES, Physical Education 

BERNARD B. COHEN, Psychology 

'FAYE A. COLLICOTT, Librarian 

GERALDINE C. CONBEER, Librarian 

STELLA CONAWAY, Vocal and Choral Music 

EDWIN B. COTTRELL, Health and Physical 
Education 

'GEORGE R. CRESSMAN, Education 

GEORGANN CULLEN, Biology 

'KATHERINE M. DENWORTH, Education 

PHILUP DONLEY, Health and Physical Education 

RAYMOND A. DOYLE, History 

MARC L. DURAND, Chemistry 



tDeceased 



Faculrv 



ANNE O. DZAAIBA. Hnion 

'MARK M. EVANS. Director of Student Teaching 

•MARION FARNHAM.Wr/ 

RLITH FELDMAN, Psychology 

ALBERT E. FILANO. Vice President for Academic 
Affairs and Mathematical Sciences 

BYRON Y. FLECK, Dean of Social Sciences 

THO\L\S J. FRANCELLA, Criminal Justice 

HOWARD FREENIAN, Counseling 

JOHN FURLOW, Physical Education 

CHARLES GANGEMI, Keyboard Music 

CHARLOTTE M. GOOD, Education 

•ROBERT B. GORDON, Sciences 

'ANNE M. GOSHEN, Psychology 

•MIRIAM S. GOTTLIEB, Music 

ROBERT GREENE, Foreign Languages 

SEYMOUR S. GREENBERG. Geology 

THELMA J. GREEPWOOD, Biology 

MADELYN GUTWIRTH, Foreign Languages 

•SAUNDRA M. HALL, Theatre Arts 

•H.THEODORE HALLMAN,y?r/ 

JOAN HASSELQUIST, Childhood Studies and 
Reading 

JACK GARDNER HAWTHORNE, /^r/ 

•CHARLES W. HEATHCOTE, Social Sciences 

THOMAS J. HEIM, Social Sciences 

FRANK a HELMS, Library 

WALTER J. HIPPLE, Philosophy 

•PHILIP R HOGGARD, Education 

PATRICIA CARLEY JOHNSON, History 

PAMELA JUDSON-RHODES (HEMPHILL). 
Art 

CAROLYN B. KEEFE, Communication Studies 

•MARY KEETZ, Literacy 

JAMES KELLEI lER, English 

•W. GLENN KILLINGER, Dean of Men 

'CHARLOTTE E. KING, Childhood Studies and 
Reading 

MARY L. KLINE, Nursing 

•CARRIE C. KULP, Education 

'GEORGE LANGDON, Geography and Planning 



MUKILL LEAL 1 1, lUu.i,.' and Physical Education 
JAMES E. L'HEUREUX, Mathematics 
•MELVIN M. LORBACK, Physical Education 
SANDRA R MATHER, Geology and Astronomy 
GEORGE iVL^XlM, Elementary Education 
•GRACE D. MCCARTHY, English 
LYNETTE F MCGRATH. English 
'EMIL H. MESSIKOMER. Dean 
JAMES S. MILNE. Political Science 
•LLOYD C. MITCHELL, Dean of Music 
WILLIAM M. MOREHOUSE, Theatre Arts 
SHIRLEY A. MUNGER, Music 
'DOROTHY R. NOWACK, Health 
BERNARD S. OLDSEY, English 
WILLIAM R. OVERLEASE, Biology 
JACK A. OWENS, Health and Physical Education 

RUTH PETKOFSKY, Childhood Studies and 

Reading 

'DOROTHY RAMSEY, English 

GEORGE R REED, Geology and Astronomy 

N. RUTH REED, Health 

RUSSELL K. RICKERT, Physics and Dean of 
Sciences and Mathematics 

WALTER NATHANIEL RIDLEY, Education 

ALFRED D. ROBERTS, Foreign Languages 

RONALD F ROMIG, Biology 

'B. PAUL ROSS, Education 

PHILIP B. RUDNICK, Chemistry 

•HELEN WJi^^hU Library Science 

C. RUTH SABOL, English 

GLENN W. SMMin^SO^, Anthropology and 

Sociology 

HAROLD R. SANDS, Psychology 

HARRY SCHALK, History 

•GERTRUDE K. SCHMIDT, Music 

JOHN SHEA, Political Science 

JANE E. SHEPPARD, Vocal and Choral Music 

•IRENEG. SIIUR, «H/ory 

•CAROLYN G. SlMMENDINGER,.4r/ 

W. CLYDE SKILLEN, Biology 

•KENNETH C. SLAGLE, Dean of Arts and Sciences 



PHILIP I). SMITI 1, JR.. Foreign Languages 

NORBERT C. SOLDON, History 

•CHARLES A. SPRENKLE. Dean of Music 

RUTH S. STANLEY, Mathematical Sciences 

JOSEPH A. STIGORA, Communicative Disorders 

R. GODFREY STUDENMUND, Education 

RUSSELL L. STURZEBECKER, Dean of 
Health and Physical Education 

JANE B. SWAN, History 

ROY D. SWEET, Vocal and Choral Music 

•EARL F SYKES, President 

EUNOR Z. TAYLOR, Physical Education and 
Dean of Administration 

•JOSEPH NL THORSON. Business Administration 

•WILLARD J. TREZISE, Biology 

JOHN J. TURNER, JR., History 

'EDWARD T TWARDOWSKI, Health and 
Physical Education 

*S. ELIZABETH TYSON, English 

JOY VANDEVER, Music Education 

•EARLE C. WATERS. Health and Physical 

Education 

RUTHI.WEIDNER./^rt 

SOL WEISS, Mathematical Sciences 

THEODORA L. WEST, English 

BENJAMIN WHITTEN, Keyboard Music 

ARDIS M. WILLIAMS, Chemistry 

LOIS M. WILLIAMS, Music 

HARRY WILKINSON, Music 

LLOYD C. WILKINSON. Physical Education 

'JOSEPHINE E. WILSON. English 

JAMES J. WRIGHT, Music Theory and Composition 

EDWIN L. YOUMANS, Dean of Health and 
Physical Education 

ROBERT J. YOUNG, History 

CARLOS R. ZIEGLER, Childhood Studies and 
Reading , 

'EDWARD ZIMMER, Music 

CORNELIA ZIMMERMAN, Childhood Studies 
and Reading 

tDcceascd 



Honorary Degrees 

1984 

ANDREW WYETH, Doctor of Humane Letters 

199,^ 

EM 1 1, IE KESSEL ASPLUNDH, Doctor of Public 

Service 
CONSTANCE E. CLAYTON, Doctor of Public 

Service 

1994 

DAVID P ROSELLE, Doctor ofUvi 

CHARLES E. SWOPE, Doctor of Public Service 

1995 

WILLIAM A. BOUCHER, Doctor of Public Service 



■/ 1996 

CURT WEI.DON, Doctor of Public Service 
ELINOR Z. TAYLOR, Doctor of Public Service 

1997 

JACOB LAWRENCE, Doctor of Fine Arts 

1998 

' CIIAIM V0'\'0\!^, Doctor of Humane Letters 
MARIAN WASHINGTON, Doctor of Public 
Service 

1999 

PASQUALE W. "PAT" CROCE, JR., Doctor of 

Public Service 
CLIFFORD E. DeBAPTISTE, Doctor of Law 



2000 

DAVID P HOLVECK. Doctor of Public Service 
IRVSaN H. VQUSHOOY., Doctor of Public Service 

2001 

ALAN G. MACDIARMID, Doctor of Science 

F EUGENE DIXON. JR.. Doctor of Public Service 

2003 

WILLIAM H. COSBY. JR., Doctor of Public Service 
LISA SCOTTOLINE. Doctor of Law 

^004 

DANA GIOIA, Doctor of Humane Letters 
JAMES M. RUBILLO, Doctor of Science 



Faculty 



President's Medallion for Service 

1986 

EMILIF. KF.SSF.I. ASPI.UNOH 
JANICKWFIR inSHIKl) 
W. GLENN KILLINGER 

1987 

THOMAS B, CHAMBERS 
T.FRANK GANNON 
WILLIAM F. HUGHES 
MICHAEL J. JONFS 
SARA L. SCHMID 
KURT STRAUSS 

1989 

ATSUSHI MINOHHARA 
MASAYOSHl TANAKA . 

1990 

CLIFFORD E. DeBAPTISTE 



1991 

MORGAN DOWD 
ADELYENE KELLY 
ALVY KELLY 

1992 

STANLEY J. YAROSEWICK 

1993 

ALBERT E. FILANO 



1994 

JAMES L. LARSON 
R JOSEPH LOEPER 

1995 

CARLOS R. ZIEGLER 

1997 

RAY M. MINCARELLI.JR. 

ROSANNE D. MINCARELLI 



1998 

HENRY A.JORDAN 
BARBAIM M.JORDAN 
JOHN K UNRUH 

1999 

LITTLETON G. MITCHELL 

2000 

MURIEL BERMAN 
LARRY MEN DTE 

2002 

MARTIN R. BERNDT 

2004 

DONALD MCILVAIN 

MARTHA FORD MCILVAIN 



Trustees Achievement Awards 

198S 

FRANK GROSSHANS 
CHARLES C. SOUFAS, JR. 

1986 

RICHARD W. FIELDS 

1987 

MARSHALL J. BECKER 
WACLAW SZYMANSKI 

1989 

CHRISTOPHER BUCKLEY 
LARRY A. NELSON 

1990 

PAUL STOLLER 



1992 

MARY E. CRAWFORD 

1995 

RICHARD E. BLAKE 

FRANK E. FISH 

1996 

JEROME M. WILLIAMS 

1997 

STERLING E. MURRAY 

1998 

KOSTAS MYRSIADES 



2000 

RICHARD EPSTEIN 
CLAUDE FOSTER 

2001 

RUSSELL VREELAND 

2002 

STAGEY SCHLAU 

2003 

MICHAEL A. PEICH 

2004 

ROBERT MAGGIO 



Distinguished Teaching Chairs 



1982-1983 

FRANK A. SMITH 
JANE B. SWAN 



Faculty Merit Awards 

1982-1983 

DIANE O. CASAGRANDE 
MARY A. KEETZ 
JANE E. SHEPPARD 
CHARLES H. STUART 

1983-1984 

ELIZABETH A. GIANGIULIO 
KOSTAS MYRSIADES 
LOIS WILLIAMS 

1984-1985 

FRANK E. MILLIMAN 
RUTH I.WEIDNER 

1986-1987 

G. WINFIELD F.\IRCHILD 

KOSTAS MYRSIADES 

1987-1988 

WALLACE J. KAHN 
STERLING E. MURRAY 
ARI.ENE C. RENGERT 

1988-1989 

PAMELA HEMPHILL 



1989-1990 

MADELV-N GUTWIRTH 
JOAN HASSELQUIST 

1990-1991 

BENJAMIN WHITTEN 

1991-1992 

CI IRISTOPHER BUCKLEY 

1992-1993 
WILLL\MTOROP 

1993-1994 

LOUIS CASCIATO 

1995-1996 

T OBINKARAM ECHEWA 
PHILIP RUDNICK 

1996-1997 

RICHARD E. BLAKE 
REBECCA PAULY 
EUSEA.TRLWO 



1997-1998 

H.JAMES BURGWYN 
JASMIN T MCCONATHA 

1998-1999 

DONNA L. USHER 
PAUL A. STOLLER 

1999-2000 

LEIGH SR/VFFER 
RICHARD WOODRUFF 

2000-2001 

MARTHA POTVIN 
KARIN VOLKWEIN 

2001-2002 

RONALD GOUGHER 

2002-2003 

FRANK E. nSH 
C. GIL WISWAL 

2003-2004 
HELEN BERGER 
GAIL GALUTANO 



Faculty 



Lindback Distinguished Teaching Award 



1998 

ERMINIO BRAIDOTTI 

1999 

SUSAN C. SLANINKA 



2000 

W. BENNETT PETERS 

2001 

ANNE-MARIE MOSCATELLI 



2002 

GAIL BOLUN 

2003 

DENA BEEGHLY 



Irving Hersch Cohen Faculty Merit Award 



1990 

DOROTHY NOWACK 

1991 

GEORGE CLAGHORN 

1993 

JUDITH HNKEL 

1994 

RICHARD VELETA 



1995 

DEBORAH MAHLSTEDT 

1997 

IRENE G. SHUR 

1998 

DIANE O. CASAGRANDE 

1999 

JOHN J. TURNER 



2001 

ROBERT MAGGIO 

KENNETH L. LAUDERMILCH 

2002 

HENRY GRABB 

2003 

DAVID SPRENKLE 



Distinguished Faculty Awards 

1974-1975 

THOMAS A. EGAN, Teaching 
E. RILEY HOLMAN, TeaMng 
MICHAEL A. PEICH, TeaMng 

1975-1976 

WALTER E. BUECHELEJR., Service 
CARMELA L. CINQUINA, Service 
PHILLIP B. DONLEY, Service 
GEORGE W. MAXIM, Teaching 
EDWARD N. NORRIS, Service 
PHILIP D. SMITH, JR., Teaching 
WILLL^M TOROP, Teaching 



1976-1977 

ROBERT E, BYTNAR, Service 
ANDREW E. DINNIMAN, Service 
IRENE G. SHUR, Teaching 
RUSSELL L. STURZEBECKER, Service 

1977-1978 

MARC L. DURAND and ROBERT F. FOERY 

(Joint Project), Service 
BERNARDS. OLDSEY, Service 
GEORGE F REED, Teaching 
RICHARD I. WOODRUFF Teaching 

1978-1979 

ROBERT E. CARLSON, Service 
JOHN I. TURNER, JR., Teaching 
C. RALPH VERNO, Teaching 
ROBERT H. WEISS, Service 



1979-1980 

CAROLYN B. KEEFE, Teaching 
JOHN A. MANGRAVITE. Teaching 
PHILIP D. SMITH, JR., Service 
NORBERT C. SOLDON, Service 

1980-1981 

LOUIS A. CASCIATO, Teaching 
PHILIP B. RUDNICK, Service 
FRANK A. SMITH, JR., Teaching 
JANE B. SWAN, Teaching 
JOSEPH M.THORSON, Service 



University Policy 

When storm conditions affect the operation of the Universit)', 
announcements are made over local radio and TV stations via a 
system of code numbers keyed to affected schools. Prefixes 
indicate whether the school will be closed or open later than 
usual. The University's numbers and applicable prefixes are 853 
for cancellation of day classes and 2853 for evening classes. 
On Tuesday or Thursday, either a two-hour delay or class cancel- 
lation will be called. Two-hour delays on these days will mean 
that 8 a.m. classes arc cancelled, and the class normally starting 
at 9:30 a.m. will start at 10 a.m. and continue to 10:50 a.m. 
On Monday, Wednesday, or Friday, a one-hour delay means 
that the 8 a.m. class is cancelled. A two-hour delay means 
that both the 8 a.m. and 9 a.m. classes are cancelled. 
Most radio stations begin announcements around 6 a.m. The 
school closings are usually repeated about once each half- hour. 
For evening classes, a decision to cancel will be made around 



for Storm Closings 

noon, and announcements should begin around 1 p.m. Although 
classes may be cancelled, essential personnel must report to 
work. People should not call Public Safcr\' for school closing 
information, since it ties up phone lines that must be kept clear 
for emergencies. Storm closing information is available on: 

Philadelphia radio: Local Radio: Television: 

KYW 1060 AM WCI IK 1520 AM VVCAU NBC TV 10 

WCOJ 1420 AM 

WILM 1450 AM 

WJBR 1290 AM 

WSBA 910 AM 

VVCUR91.7FM 

WDAC 94.5 FM 

WARM 10.3 FM 

WLAN 97 FM 
Telephone: 

University Information Desk 
610-436-1000 



WDAS 1480 AM 
WDAS 105.3 FM 
WKDN 106.9 FM 



WGALTVS 
WTXF FOXTV 29 

Web: 

www.wcupa.edu 

\vww.kv'wl060.com 

\nvw.nbcl0.coni 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2005-2007 



FALL SEMESTER 2005 



FALL SEMESTER 2006 



August 27 and 28 
August 29 

September 5 
October 4 
October 10-11 
October 13 
November 23 
November 28 
December 10-11 
December 12 
December 13-17 
December 18 



Residence halls open 

Classes begin - 8 a.m. 

Late Registration and Drop/ Add 

Labor Day (no classes) 

Rosh Hashanah* 

Fall Break (no classes) 

Yom Kippur* 

Thanksgiving recess begins - 8 a.m. 

Thanksgiving recess ends - 8 a.m. 

Reading days 

Last day of classes 

Examination period 

Commencement 



August 26 and 27 
August 28 

September 4 
September 23 
October 2 
October 16-17 
November 22 
November 27 
December 9-10 
December 11 
December 12-16 
December 17 



Residence halls open 

Classes begin - 8 a.m. 

Late Registration and Drop/ Add 

Labor Day (no classes) 

Rosh Hashanah* 

Yom Kippur* 

Fall Break (no classes) 

Thanksgiving recess begins — 8 a.m. 

Thanksgiving recess ends - 8 a.m. 

Reading days 

Last day of classes 

Examination period 

Commencement 



SPRING SEMESTER 2006 



SPRING SEMESTER 2007 



January 16 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 


January 15 


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day 




(no classes) 




(no classes) 


January 17 


Classes begin - 8 a.m. 


January 16 


Classes begin - 8 a.m. 




Late Registration and Drop/ Add 




Late Registration and Drop/ Add 


January 31 - 


February INo classes 


Januar}' 30-31 


No classes 


March 10 


Spring break begins - 5 p.m. 


March 9 


Spring break begins - 5 p.m. 


March 20 


Spring break ends - 8 a.m. 


March 19 


Spring break ends - 8 a.m. 


AprU 13 


Passover* 


April 3 


Passover* 


AprU 14 


Good Friday* 


April 6 


Good Friday* 


May 3 


Last day of classes 


May 2 


Last day of classes 


May 4-5 


Reading days/Make-up days 


May 3-4 


Reading days 


May 8-12 


Examination period 


May 7 -11 


Examination period 


May 13 


Commencement 


May 12 


Commencement 



Please consult the current course schedule and the University's Web site (www.wcupa.edu) for the most up-to-date calendars, 
including the one for summer. 



"Although the University will be in session, no examinations are to be administered on these major Chrisrian and Jewish holy days. All members of the academic 
community are also expected to be considerate of and provide appropriate accommodations to students of other faiths when assignments, exams, and other course 
requirements fall on the major holy days of their reUgions. 



Campus Map 



North Campus 




■*■ Shuttle bus stop 

E Emergency phones 
^M Student parking" 
CiHI Faculty/Staff parking* 
0^ Faculty/Stafl/Student parking* 
H Visitor parking 

'University decal required. Lot 

restrictions designated by 

posted signs, which take 

precedent over published 

matenals. 
A separate map designating 
parking for the handicapped 
is available at Public Safety 
in the Peoples Maintenance 
Building. 



South Camp 




Borough of West Chester 




Chester County 




Index 



A 

Academic 

calendar, 119 

Dishonesty Policy, 18-20 

information and regulations, 14-23 

probation, 7 
Accounting, 37 
Accreditation, ii 
Active Status, 15 

ADA Policy and Accommodations, ii 
ADA Policy Statement, 22-23 
Adding a course, 1 6 
Address changes, 10, 20 
Administration, 29-31 

of the Universit)', 104 
Admission, 4-7 

requirements, 4-5 

to degree candidacy, 7-8 

to Teacher Education for Certification, 21 
Advisory System, 15 
Anthropolog)' and Sociology, 31-32 
Applicable Catalog Year, 14 
Application 

deadline, 4 

fee, 9, 11 

for Graduation, 21 

procedure, 4 

to degree candidacy, 8 
Applied Music, 81-83 
Applied Statistics, 78-79 
Art, 32-33 
Assistantships, 12-13 
Astronomy, See Geology and Astronomy 
Audit fee, 10 

Auditor Status, changing to, 16 
Auditors, 6 

Awards (faculty), 115-118 
Awards and grants, see Financial Aid 

B 

Basic Fees, 8 

Billing address changes, 10 

Biology, 33-36 

Black Student Union, 26 

Bookstore, 24-25 

Borough of West Chester map, 121 

Business Administration, 36-37 



Calendar, academic, 119 
Campus, 3 

map, 120 
Career Development Center, 25 
Certificate 

for individual programs, see Graduate 
Programs of Study, 2 

in Administration, 29 

of Advanced Graduate Study, 54 

program policy, 5 
Certification, Teaching, 21-22 

for indiWdual programs, see Graduate 
Programs of Study, 2 
Change 

in name or address, 10, 20 



Change 

in program, 16 

of status, 16 
Chemistry, 40-41 
Chester County Map, 122 
Children's Center, 26 
Classification of Students, 14-15 
Clinical Psychology, See Psychology 
Commencement fee, 11 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, 103 
Communication Studies, 42-43 
Communications Directory, ii 
Communicative Disorders, 43-44 
Comprehensive examination, 20 
Computer Science, 45-46 
Computing Services, See Information Services 
Condensed format courses, 15-16 
Continuous Enrollment, 15 
Counseling and Educational Psychology, 46—49 
Counseling and Psychological Services 

Department, 27 
Counselor Education, 47-48 
Course 

audit fee, 10 

load, See Enrollment Classification 

numbering system, 15 

prefixes, guide to, 102 

Repeat Policy, 16-17 
Credit by Examination, 16 
Credit, transfer of, 6, 16 
Criminal Justice, 49-50 
Crossover registration fees, 1 1 

D 

Deadline, application, 4 
Defense of Master's Thesis, 21 
Degree 

candidacy, 7-8 

programs, 2 

requirements, 7-8 

students, 14-15 

See also individual program listings 
Directions to West Chester, 3 
Directory Information, 22 
Dishonesty PoUcy, 18-20 
Dishonored check fee, 10 
Driver Education and Safe Living, 73 
Dropping a course, 16 



Early Childhood and Special Education, 50-53 
Earth and Space Science, See Geology and 

Astronomy 
Economics and Finance, 37-38 
Educational Psychology, 48-49, 94 
Educational Research Program, 94 
Educational ser\'ices fee, 9 
Educational Specialist Certification, 22 
Elementary Education, 53-55 
Elementary School Counseling, 47 
EngUsh, 55-60 
Enrollment classification, 16 
Emironmental Education, 95 
Examinations, other, 21 



Faculty, 105-115 

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, See 

Directory Information 
Federal 

Perkins Loan Program, 12 

Stafford Loan, 12 

Work Study, 13 
Fee refunds, 10-11 
Fees and expenses, 8-11 
Fees for Crossover Registration, 11 
Finance, See Economics and Finance 
Financial aid, 11-14 
Foreign Languages, 60-61 
Formal Admission to Teacher Education for 

Certification, 21 
Francis Harvey Green Library, 23 
Frederick Douglass 

Graduate Assistantships, 13 

Institute, 22 

Society, 26 
French, See Foreign Languages 



General Fee, 9 

Geography and Planning, 62-63 

Geolog)' and Astronomy, 63-65 

Gerontology, See Anthropolog)' and Sociology 

Good Standing, 7 

Grace Cochran Research on Women Award, 14 

Grade 

appeals, 17-18 

change policy, 17 

definitions, 16 

reports, 17 
Grading System, 16 
Graduate 

assistantships, 12-13 

certificate program policy, 5 

degree programs, 2 

Management Admission Test, 5-6 

Record Examination, 5-6 

residence assistants, 13 

Student Association, 26 

Student Association fee, 9 

Studies, Office of, ii 

Studies at West Chester, 3 
Graduation, application for, 21 
Grants, See Financial Aid 
Guaranteed Student Loan, See Stafford Loan 
Guide to Course Prefixes, 102 

H 

Health 

Center, 24 

Center fee, 9 

Department of, 65-68 
Higher Education Counseling, 47 
History, 68-70 

of the University, 3 
Holocaust and Genocide Studies, 70-71 
Honor Societies, 26-27 
Honors and Awards (faculty), 115-118 
Housing, 23 



Index 



Housing tec, V 

Housing retunds, 10 

How to Reach West Chester, 3 

Human Resouacs Management, M.S.A., 30 

I 

Identification card fee, 1 1 

Individualized Concentration, M.S.A., 30 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology, See 

Psychology 
Infirmary, See Health Center 
Information Services, 24 
Institute for Women, 26 

graduate grant, 13, 26 
Instructional Media, 71 
Instrument rental fees, 10 
Insurance, See Health Center 
International 

education, 26 

students, 6-7 

student services fee, 1 1 



K 



Kinesiology, 71-74 



Late payment fee, 10 

Late registration fee, 10 

Leadership for Women, 31, 74-75 

Leave of absence, 16 

Librar)', Francis Harvey Green, 23 

Linguistics, 75-76 

Literacy, 76-77 

Literature, See English 

Loans, See Financial Aid 

Long-Term Care, M.S.A., 31, 32 

M 

Management, 38-39 
Maps 

Campus, 120 

Chester County, 122 

West Chester Borough, 121 
Marketing, 39 

Master's degree, requirements for, 8 
Mathematics, 78-80 
Matriculation fee, 4 
M.B.A., 36-37 
Meal fee, 9-10 
Meal refunds, 10-11 
Miller Analogies Test, 6 
Mission and Values Statements, i 
M.S.A., 29-31 
Multicultural Affairs, 25 
Music, 80-87 

Applied, 81-83 

Education, 83-85 

History and Literature, 85-86 

instrument rental fees, 10 

Theory/Composition, 86-87 

N 

Name change, 20 

"No Grades," removing, 17 

Nondegree students, 15 

Nondiscrimination/ Affirmative Action Policy, ii 

Notification of admission, 4 

Nursing, 87-89 



o 

Obtaining transcripts, 20 

Off-Campus and Commuter Services, 23 

Off-Campus Housing, 23-24 



Parking fee, 11 

Partial Pa)'ment Policy, 10 

Pass/Fail Grades, 16 

Payment of fees, 10 

Pennsylvania Teacher Intern Certification 

Program, 21 
Perkins Loan Program, 12 
Philosophy, 90 

Physical Education, See Kinesiology 
Placement, See Career Development Center 
Political Science, 90-91 
Probation, academic, 7 

Procedure for application to degree candidacy, i 
Professional 

and Secondary Education, 91-95 

certificates, 22 

growth status, 15 
Programs of Study, 2 
Provisional matriculation, 15 
Psychology, 95-97 

Public Administration, M.S.A., 31, 91 
Public Health, See Health 
Public Safety, 25 

R 

Reading, See Literacy 

Readmission, 7, 15 

Reapplication for degree candidacy, 8 

Recreation and Leisure Programs, 27 

Reftind policies, 10-11 

Regional Planning, M.S.A., 31, 62 

Registration, 15 

Removing "No Grade," 17 

Repeat Policy, 16-17 

Requirements for 

admission, 4-5 

degree candidacy, 7-8 

Master of Education degree, 8 

Master's degree, 8 
Research requirements, 21 
Residence Hall Graduate Assistants, 13 
ResponsibiUty, student, 4 
Room and Board, See Housing fee 



Scholarships, 13-14 

Kinesiology Department, 13 

Special Education Department, 13-14 

Professor Russell Sturzebccker, 14 

Dr. Charles S. Swope, 14 

Charles Mayo, 14 

Sharon H. Ennis Graduate Study, 14 

Greater West Chester Chamber of Com- 
merce M.B.A./James Hamilton, 14 
School Health, See Health 
Second master's degree, 21 
Secondary 

Education, 91-95 

School Counseling, 47 

Teaching Certification, 92 
Senior Citizen Policy, 6 
Services for Students with Disabilities, 24 



Sexual Harassment Policy, ii 

Snow days. See Storm Closings 

Social Work. Graduate, 97-99 

Sociology, See Anthropology and Sociology 

Spanish. See Foreign Languages 

Special Education, 50-53 

Speech and Hearing Clinic, 25 

Speech Patholog)', See Communicative Disorders 

Sport and Athletic Administration, M.S.A., 31, 

73 
Stafford Loan, Federal, 12 
Status 

active, 15 

change of, 16 
Storm Closings, 118 
Structure of the University, 28 
Student 

Activities Council, 27 

Consumer Rights and Responsibilities, 12 

Responsibility, 4 

services, 23-27 
Submitting the thesis for binding, 21 
Summer Sessions, 3 
Sykes Union 

Building, 25-26 

expansion fee, 9 

fee, 9 



Teaching and Learning with Technology, 93 
Teaching Certification, 21-22 
Teaching English as a Second Language, 

100-101 
Technology Tuition Fee, 8 
Theatre and Dance, 101 
Thesis binding, 21 

Time to complete the degree program, 14 
Training and Development, M.S.A., 31 
Transcript fee, 10 
Transcripts, obtaining, 20 
Transfer of credit, 6, 16 

u 

Uncollectible Check Policy, 10 
Undergraduate 

courses, fees for crossover registration, 11 

courses for graduate credit, 15 
Undergraduates (taking graduate courses), 6 
Universit)' Services and Student Living, 23-27 

V 

Vehicle Registration, 25 
Veterans Affairs, 26 

w 

West Chester, how to reach, 3 
Withdrawal procedure, 10, 16 
Withdrawal/enrollment change and aid, 12 
Women's Center, 26 
Women's Studies, 101 
Work Study, Federal, 13 
Workshops, 15